Atlantis Online
April 25, 2024, 10:13:50 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Comet theory collides with Clovis research, may explain disappearance of ancient people
http://uscnews.sc.edu/ARCH190.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

the TITANS & early Greek Mythology

Pages: 1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25 26   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: the TITANS & early Greek Mythology  (Read 17156 times)
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #300 on: November 13, 2008, 01:21:23 pm »

Ideopraxist
Member
Member # 1905

  posted 08-13-2005 02:36 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thank you, what a nice read.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 220 | Registered: Mar 2004
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #301 on: November 13, 2008, 01:21:33 pm »

Rich

Member
Member # 2265

Member Rated:
   posted 08-13-2005 07:08 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://ancientneareast.tripod.com/Beirut_Berytus.html

"The first historical reference to Beirut dates from the 15th century BC when it is mentioned in a cuneiform tablet discovered in Egypt at Amarna."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 2387 | From: Parts Unknown, USA | Registered: Dec 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #302 on: November 13, 2008, 01:22:00 pm »

unknown

Member
Member # 2403

Member Rated:
   posted 08-13-2005 08:01 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://thanasis.com/modern/pandora.htm

When Zeus, the king of the Olympian gods, was young and trying to establish his rule, he was challenged by a group of ferocious Titans, who tried to keep him from gaining power. A long and terrible war ensued, with all the Olympian gods joined against the Titans, who were led by Cronus and Atlas.

After ten years of fighting, and with the help of the Cyclopes and the Hecatoncheires (The Hundred-Handed-Ones), Zeus and his fellow Olympians defeated the Titans. Only a few Titans, including Themis, Prometheus and his brother Epimetheus, fought on the side of Zeus - against their fellow Titans - and once Zeus won, he rewarded them.

But soon Prometheus made Zeus very angry by stealing fire from Mount Olympus and giving it to the race of mortal men living on earth, who were cold and hungry. Zeus had warned Prometheus not to give fire to men, and was outraged that anyone had the nerve to ignore his command.

Still, he would seem ungrateful if he appeared to forget the important role that Prometheus and his brother Epimetheus had played in the war against the Titans, and he couldn't just kill the brothers, so he cunningly devised a scheme to get even!

PANDORA IS CREATED

In revenge, Zeus ordered Hephaestus, the god of smiths, to craft a gorgeous woman out of earth and water. The beautiful goddess of Love, Aphrodite, was asked to pose as a model, just to make sure the woman was perfect. Once this was done, the Four Winds (or some say Hephaestus himself) breathed life into her and there she lay sleeping, brand spanking new!

The first mortal woman on earth was to be bestowed with unparalleled charm and beauty, and her unknown mission would be to bring mischief and misery upon the human race. Zeus then summoned the other Olympians and asked them each to give this new creation a gift.


Aphrodite adorned her with beauty, grace and desire; Hermes, the Messenger god, gave her cunning and boldness; Demeter showed her how to tend a garden; Athena taught her manual dexterity and to spin; Apollo taught her to sing sweetly and play the lyre; Poseidon's gift was a pearl necklace and the god of the sea promised her that she would never drown.

But Zeus also made her foolish, mischievous and idle. This was the first woman, divine in appearance but quite human in reality.

The gods called her Pandora, which means "All-gifted", or "The gift of all", because each god had given her a power by which she would work the ruin of man, and because of the many presents bestowed upon her at Olympus.

Lovely Pandora was created to become the wife of the Titan Epimetheus, who was the not-very-bright brother of Prometheus, the one who had gotten on Zeus' bad side. Before sending her to earth, the gods held a big banquet and Hermes, the Messenger god, presented Pandora with a splendidly crafted jar (some say a box), adorned with wonderful images. But Hermes warned Pandora that she must never open the jar (box)!

She must NEVER open the box...And then Zeus' wife, Hera, gave her the quality of curiosity! Tell me, is that fair?

They also gave her silvery raiment and a broidered veil, and in her hair they placed bright garlands of fresh flowers and a wonderful crown of gold. Her gowns were most sumptuous and she was truly a vision from heaven.

When Pandora was finally brought out and shown to the gods, resplendent in all the finery she had received, great amazement and wonder took hold of them, such was the effect of her beauty...


PANDORA COMES TO EARTH

Prometheus (whose name means 'forethought') had warned his brother Epimetheus ('afterthought') never to accept any gift from Zeus, knowing that the king of the Olympians bore a heavy grudge against him. However, Hermes took her by the hand and escorted Pandora down to earth, safely guiding her down the slope of Mount Olympus. When the Messenger god delivered her before Epimetheus, the foolish Titan was overwhelmed by her exquisite beauty - Indeed Pandora was the most beautiful woman ever created!

"Glorious Zeus feels bad for the sorrow and disgrace that has plagued your family." said trickster Hermes to the Titan. "To make up for it, and to demonstrate that there are no hard feelings toward you for your brother's folly, Zeus presents you with this gift -- This beautiful woman named Pandora, the fairest in all the world, is to become your wife."

Epimetheus, instantly forgetting his wiser brother's admonitions, eagerly accepted the lovely gift from Zeus and made her his wife. Pandora settled into their large home and took on the wifely duties, baking and spinning and tending the garden. She thought herself the happiest bride in the world as she played melodious tunes on the lyre and joyfully danced for her new husband.

But Pandora daily was tortured by curiosity. Hey, how would you like to receive a beautiful wedding present, shiny and inviting, only to be told you could never open it? Talk about torture! That's not fair!

At first she kept the golden box on the table and daily polished it so that visitors might admire its beauty. The brilliant sunlight sparkled from the precious box, beckoning her it seems, begging to be opened.

So inviting...so inviting...Hera's gift, curiosity, was like a cruel curse. Pandora wondered what the box contained. Her imagination created intriguing scenarios, for the box was so beautiful on the outside, how could it not hold exquisite treasures inside? Surely Hermes was kidding when he said never to open it, he's such a joker, thought Pandora.

"I bet Hermes really wanted me to open the box," she mused, "he's probably watching right now, waiting for me to look inside so that I can be delightfully surprised and thank him. Surely he's hidden a splendid surprise inside..."


But deep inside her, Pandora knew that her promise must not be broken. Her better sense finally overcame her ardent curiosity and she removed the box from the table and concealed it in a dusty hidden storeroom. This made matters worse - she found herself walking by the storeroom and pausing at the doorway, as if the mysterious golden box was calling to her. Sometimes she would enter the room and hold the box for a guilty moment, then rush out and lock the door. This was killing her!

Desperate, Pandora took the box and locked it inside a heavy wooden chest. She placed chains around the chest, dug a hole, and buried it in her garden. With great effort she rolled a huge boulder on top of the "grave", determined to forget all about this object of her obsession.

She couldn't sleep that night. No matter how she tried, her thoughts kept returning to the buried golden box. She put on her robe and went out to the garden. As if in a trance, Pandora found herself drawn to the boulder. She reached out and touched the stone and like magic it moved, revealing the hole. This must be a sign from Hermes!

"You must never open the box!" As she dug the earth to get to the box, the Messenger god's words rang in her mind. "Never open the box!"

Pandora wanted to obey the command of the gods, and she really wasn't wicked, but at last she could no longer contain her curiosity. Taking the little golden key from around her neck, she fitted it into the keyhole and gently opened the box. Just a tiny bit, so that she could have a little peek, you see, and then she was going to close it up again. Just a little, tiny peek...It was her wedding gift, after all...


painting by John William Waterhouse

Bad move. No sooner had Pandora opened the box, that she realized her mistake. A foul smell filled the air and she heard swarming and rustling inside. In horror she slammed the lid shut, but alas it was too late! The evil had been unleashed!

You see, the vindictive gods had each put something harmful inside the box. All the plagues and sorrows known to humanity were released once Pandora opened the jar. Old Age, Sickness, Insanity, Pestilence, Vice, Passion, Greed, Crime, Death, Theft, Lies, Jealousy, Famine, the list went on and on...every evil, that until then had been trapped inside the gift from the gods, was now loosed upon the earth.


First the scourges stung Pandora and Epimetheus on every part of their body, then the evils scattered throughout the world and mixed with the good, so that they were indistinguishable, and humans had a hard time telling between the two extremes. Entering a house, these monster hang from the rafters and bide their time, waiting for the perfect moment to swoop down and sting their victim, bringing pain, pestilence, sorrow and death.

Woe was Pandora! The poor girl was terror-stricken at what she had caused, and at this unexpected eruption of evil. But just as she thought all was lost, one little Sprite, a solitary good thing, hidden at the bottom of the jar, flew out.

It was Hope! Deep down inside the hateful jar was the only thing that has sustained humanity in times of sorrow, pain and misery - Hope. The endless Hope that things will soon get better. And it's this Hope that keeps us going to this very day, our sole comfort in times of misfortune.

But before you go blaming all of society's ills on poor lovely Pandora, the first woman and the ultimate pariah, first consider the following question: Would you have been disciplined enough to keep the jar/box shut, or would you, like Pandora, let your curiosity get the best of you?

Hey, if it was MY wedding gift, I'd be opening it! Just so I could send a Thank You note!

EPILOGUE

Here's an interesting aside: At a still later period, rather than all the ills of the world, the box was said to have contained all the blessings of the gods. These were meant to have been preserved for the future benefit of the human race. Pandora was instructed never to open the box, but once again her curiosity got the better of her, and she had a peek.

The winged blessings at once took flight and escaped, rarely to be seen again. If only Pandora had kept the box closed! Who knows what our world would be like!


Image from an ancient Greek vase

"And in her breast, the messenger, killer of Argos, created lies; deceiving words, a deceitful heart, just as Zeus with his angry mutterings had wished. Then the herald of the gods gave her the power of speech and the name of Pandora, because that name represented all the inhabitants of Olympus who, with this gift, made a present of misfortune to mankind."

Hesiod, Theogony

--------------------
several species of small furry animals gathered together and grooving with a pict in a cave

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 1756 | From: Pontiac, MI. Oakland | Registered: Mar 2005   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #303 on: November 13, 2008, 01:22:16 pm »

Riven

Member
Member # 1495

  posted 08-14-2005 11:17 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Just bumping your thread up Chronos;

Seems we are having a problem with MARIA as JOSE.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 4190 | From: Azores Atlantis Isles. | Registered: May 2003   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #304 on: November 13, 2008, 01:22:52 pm »

Tristan

Member
Member # 2088

Member Rated:
   posted 08-15-2005 01:19 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chronos, it seems there is still some work to be done on Greek mythology. I trust you'll help us, won't you? It seems the Spaniards need to be educated on it.

--------------------
"The rain in Spain brings madness and mediocrity..."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 230 | Registered: Aug 2004
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #305 on: November 13, 2008, 01:23:15 pm »

Tristan

Member
Member # 2088

Member Rated:
   posted 08-15-2005 06:13 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Well, it seems we still need some more lessons on the relevance of the Titans to the Atlantis tale.

--------------------
"The rain in Spain brings madness and mediocrity..."

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 230 | Registered: Aug 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #306 on: November 13, 2008, 01:23:26 pm »

Rich

Member
Member # 2265

Member Rated:
   posted 08-15-2005 10:06 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.hri.org/infoxenios/english/aegean/samos/history.html
According to mythology, Samos is where the goddess Hera was born, thus the island was called Parthenia (Virginity) in ancient years.

http://www.moonspeaker.ca/Hera/hertriple.html
"She is descended from the Anatolian Sun Goddess Hebat"

[ 08-16-2005, 07:56 AM: Message edited by: Rich ]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 2415 | From: Parts Unknown, USA | Registered: Dec 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #307 on: November 13, 2008, 01:23:42 pm »

 
Ideopraxist
Member
Member # 1905

  posted 10-07-2005 02:05 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The monopoly of snake worship, Deity representation and the use of them in diguise and as guard's would fall to "The Elder God's" or the Titan's then? In the Atlantean war's which side used them the most to their advantage? as it seem's there is no way of separating Atlantis from the snake, find one, find the other.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 220 | Registered: Mar 2004   
 
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #308 on: November 13, 2008, 01:24:22 pm »

Rich

Member
Member # 2265

Member Rated:
   posted 10-12-2005 01:49 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
This page is so riddled with errors, that I almost don't want to post it. However, they make an interesting attempt at trying to identify Cecrops.

http://pages.prodigy.net/saraswati/webdoc3.htm

"One of Theseus famous ancestors on his father's side of the family was the Egyptian ruler Cecrops. According ancient Greeks accounts of this ruler, he was an Egyptian who founded the nation of Athens, Greece as a colony of Egypt. They considered him to be a ruler of supernatural origins, additionally the ancient Egyptians had the same agreement that Athens was a colony of Egypt. Cecrops name has been identified in ancient Greek literature as Kekrops, Kharops, which due to the ancient Greek method of abbreviating the names of Egyptian rulers, particularly their throne names we are able to identify this individual. The three Egyptian rulers who are mentioned as Cecrops are none other than Senwosret I ( throne name is Kheper- Ka -Re ), Senwosret II ( throne name is Ka-Kheper-Re ), and Senwosret III ( throne name is Khau-ka-Re ). Their brilliant careers were combined in the original stories of the Egyptian Heracles and the Greek Heracles. These three rulers were of the same lineage and Greek literature is very clear in reporting that Theseus was a descendant of them. Evidence is surfacing that shows that Senwosret was in all probability the first conqueror of the known world extending his rule well into the European continent, he was the driving force that brought ancient Greece and Europe into the Bronze Age. Senwosret I was clearly recognized by ancient Greeks as Heracles is academic. In a previous article on his outstanding exploits this point is clarified. Finally Senwosret ( a.k.a. Cecrops, Kharops, Kekrops, and Sesostris the Great ) was a man of native African descent as was the norm in ancient Egypt at that time, and he was portrayed in stone as the black man he was. "
...
"Strabo, XVII reports that Sen-Wos-Ret I had built a canal starting from the Nile River to the Red Sea. 7. He ordered the rebuilding of the Temple of Amen at Ipet-sut ( Karnak ) in stone. 8. He erected red granite obelisks to be placed at Heliopolis ( Northern Anu ). 9. He led a great expedition to Punt on the Somali Coast. 10. He had built the largest pyramid in the history of the Middle Kingdom Period of Egypt's history. The pyramid was 352 ft. tall. 11. He protected Egypt's borders by winning victories in a succession of military conquests to the South to gain the benefits of the economic mechanisms in Lower Nubia and to continue trading with the nations of West Asia. 12. The ancient Greeks called him "Heracles Kharops" ( Heracles the Flashing-Eyed ), "Kekrops", and "Sistosichermes Valiant Hercules." "


Note, the first Cecrops in Athens is called: Cecrops Diphyes or Cecrops of the dual nature... which is kind of strange since he is the first Cecrops.

[ 10-12-2005, 01:54 PM: Message edited by: Rich ]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 2415 | From: Parts Unknown, USA | Registered: Dec 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #309 on: November 13, 2008, 01:24:40 pm »

Boreasi

Member
Member # 2421

Member Rated:
   posted 10-12-2005 11:59 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Snake worship seems to have been all over the place. Here`s the Roman issue;
http://www.romancoins.info/Imperatorial-murderers.HTML
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 1330 | From: Norway | Registered: Apr 2005   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #310 on: November 13, 2008, 01:24:50 pm »

Rich

Member
Member # 2265

Member Rated:
   posted 10-13-2005 12:06 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheAtlanteiaPhoibe.html
"ATLANTEIA and PHOIBE were two NYMPHAI HAMADRYADES of Libya in north Africa. They were wives of the Libyan (and later Argive) King Danaus, who bore him ten of his fifty Danaid daughters.

There names are more suggestive of starry daughters of the Titan Atlas, than tree-nymphs."

[ 10-13-2005, 12:10 PM: Message edited by: Rich ]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 2415 | From: Parts Unknown, USA | Registered: Dec 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #311 on: November 13, 2008, 01:25:01 pm »

Ideopraxist
Member
Member # 1905

  posted 10-15-2005 11:58 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I think a chronological order of the appearance of snakes and the use of them rather than worship which would follow as a result is what I'm trying to find.
The God's in the very beginning seem to affiliate themselves with the snake for their purposes or is it the other way around, mabe the snake used them? This is such a good thread of the chronology of the early God's and their antic's. I wish Chronos had left an 'easy button' to pop out all the snake info in it's order too, prior to it's worship. Thank you for the reply, I appreciate your time.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 220 | Registered: Mar 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #312 on: November 13, 2008, 01:26:41 pm »

Tristan

Member
Member # 2088

Member Rated:
   posted 10-15-2005 09:16 PM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I found this information most enlightening concerning the Greek kings of Athens, posted by our new member Herr Saltzman, so allow me to share it with all of you:

Cecrops I

The name Cecrops means 'face with a tail' and it is said that this mythical Greek king, born from the earth itself, had his top half shaped like a man and the bottom half in serpent or fish-tail form. He was first king and founder of Athens itself, though preceded in the region by earth-born Actaeus, king of Attica. Cecrops was a culture-hero, teaching the Athenians marriage, reading and writing, and ceremonial burial.

During his reign Athena became the patron goddess of the city of Athens in a competition with Poseidon which Cecrops judged. They agreed that each would give the Athenians one gift and Cecrops would choose whichever gift they preferred. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident and a spring sprang up; the water was salty and was not thought very useful, whereas Athena struck the rock with her lance and an olive tree sprung up. Cecrops judged the olive tree to be the superior gift, for the olive tree brought wood, oil and food, and consequently accepted Athena as their patron. Poseidon, in a rare show of magnanimity, decided to grant his gift regardless, although its nature was initially misunderstood: it was meant to represent sea power, which Athens were to exercise gloriously in the future.

The Acropolis was also known as the Cecropia in his honor.

Cecrops I was the father of three daughters: Herse, Pandrosus and Aglaurus. To them was given a box or jar containing the infant Erichthonius of Athens to guard unseen. They looked, and terrified by the two serpents Athena had set within to guard the child, they fled in terror and lept from the Acropolis to their deaths. Some accounts say one of the sisters was turned to stone instead.

Cecrops' son Erysichthon predeceased him and he was succeeded by Cranaus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cecrops

Erichthonius of Athens

King Erichthonius (also called Erechtheus I or Erichthonios) was, according to some legends, autochthonous (born of the soil), and in other accounts he was the son of Hephaestus and Gaia or Athena or Atthis. According to Apollodorus, Hephaestus attempted to **** Athena but was unsuccessful. His semen fell on the ground, impregnating Gaia. Gaia didn't want the infant Erichthonius, so she gave the baby to Athena. Athena gave three sisters, Herse, Pandrosus and Aglaulus a small box and warned them to never open it. Aglaulus and Herse opened the box which contained the infant and future-king, Erichthonius ("troubles born from the earth"). The sight caused Herse and Aglaulus to go insane and they threw themselves off the Acropolis. Alternatively, Athena raised Erichthonius herself.

An alternative version of the same story is that, while Athena was gone bringing a mountain from Pallene to use in the Acropolis, the sisters, minus Pandrosus again, opened the box. A crow witnessed the opening and flew away to tell Athena, who fell into a rage and dropped the mountain (now Mt. Lykabettos). Once again, Herse and Aglaulus went insane and threw themselves to their deaths off a cliff.

Erichthonius later became King of Athens and implemented many beneficial changes to Athenian culture. During this time, Athena frequently protected him. He founded the Panathenaic Festival in the honor of Athena. He taught his people to yoke horses and use them to pull chariots, smelt silver and till the earth with a plough.

Erichthonius was killed by either Poseidon or Zeus as revenge for killing Himmarados of Thrace during a war between Eleusis and Athens. He was succeeded by his son Pandion I. He was sometimes said to be a snake with a human head. The snake was his symbol.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erichthonius_of_Athens

Erechtheus

Erechtheus in Greek Mythology was the name of a king of Athens, and a secondary name for two other characters

In Homer's Iliad the name is applied to the earth-born son of Hephaestus later mostly called Erichthonius by later writers. Accordingly this Erichthonius is sometimes called Erechtheus I.
A second Erechtheus was son and heir to King Pandion I of Athens by Zeuxippe, this Pandion being son of Erichthonius/Erechtheus I. This later king Erechtheus distinguished as Erechtheus II
Poseidon in Athens was generally known as Poseidon Erechtheus and the vestibule of Poseidon's temple was named the Erechtheion.
The remainder of this article describes Erechtheus I.

According to Apollodorus, Erechtheus I had a twin brother named Butes who married Erechtheus' daughter Chthonia. Erechtheus and Butes divided the royal power possessed by Pandion, Erechtheus taking the physical rule but Butes taking the priesthood of Athena and Poseidon, this right being passed on to his descendants.

Erechtheus was father by his wife Praxithea of several daughers: Protogeneia, Pandora, Procris, Creusa, Oreithyia, Chthonia, and Merope some of whom have their own stories.

His reign was marked by the war between Athens and Eleusis when the Eleusians were commanded by Eumolpus of Thrace, who (accepting the most common genealogy) was son of Poseidon by Chione daugher of Boreas by Oreithyia daughter of Erechtheus and was therefore Erechtheus' own great-grandson. An oracle declared that Athens' surivial depended on the death one of the three daughters of Erechtheus. Perhaps three unmarried daughters is meant. But in one verision it is Chthonia who is sacrificed. In another both Protogeneia and Pandora, the two eldest, offer themselves up. In any case the remaining sisters, or at least some of them, are said to kill themselves. These unforunate daughters of Erechtheus became the Hyacinthides upon their death.

In the following battle between the forces of Athens and Eleusis, Erechtheus slew Eumolpus but then himself fell in battle, struck down by Poseidon's trident according to fragments of Euripides' tragedy Eumolpus. Or Zeus slew him with a thunderbolt at Poseidon's request.

Erechtheus is succeeded by Cecrops II, his brother according to a fragment from the poet Castor but his son according to Apollodorus (3.15.1).

Other sons of Erechtheus sometimes mentioned are Orneus, Metion, Pandorus, Thespius, and Eupalamus.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erechtheus
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 230 | Registered: Aug 2004
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #313 on: November 13, 2008, 01:26:59 pm »

Boreasi

Member
Member # 2421

Member Rated:
   posted 10-16-2005 10:35 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
E-rik, E-rich, Erek or Erech used to a be a Royal Title. And thus a name. Paralell to Jupiter/Piter/Pita.

Ek/Eki means Oak/"Po"/Family-three.
Rik/Rike clearly means "kingdom". The word is still in use, and was the origin to the Roman word "Reks/Rex", a term known from the Gotic rulers of Rome (Ala-Rek, Erman-Rek).

In the german languages Erich is still used, as is Rik/Reich. "Reichs-Tag" is still the highest gouverning body of Germany, litterally saying "Eriks Day", synonymous to the Swedish "Riks-Dag".

In Sweden we still remember "Eriks-dagen" and "Eriks-gatan" as the basic principles of the "Kings Gouvernement".

Thus Erich-Ton speaks directly of the "Doings" or "Rule" of Erech. Due to the obvious and close relationship of name and semantics this is a strong clue to the ancient relationships between The Baltic and The Mediterranean.

[ 10-16-2005, 10:44 AM: Message edited by: Boreasi ]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 1330 | From: Norway | Registered: Apr 2005 
Report Spam   Logged
Crystal Thielkien
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4531



« Reply #314 on: November 13, 2008, 01:27:12 pm »

Rich

Member
Member # 2265

Member Rated:
   posted 10-17-2005 06:17 AM                       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"King Erichthonius (also called Erechtheus I or Erichthonios) was, according to some legends, autochthonous (born of the soil), and in other accounts he was the son of Hephaestus and Gaia or Athena or Atthis."

"also called Erechtheus" -- I'm not convinced. I will have to look for this in the iliad.

"he was the son of Hephaestus and Gaia or Athena or Atthis." -- Athena is "Athis".
I think "Hephaestus and Gaia" means "Egypt" and "Libya".

[ 10-17-2005, 06:19 AM: Message edited by: Rich ]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posts: 2415 | From: Parts Unknown, USA | Registered: Dec 2004   
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 ... 15 16 17 18 19 20 [21] 22 23 24 25 26   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy