Atlantis Online
July 31, 2021, 01:54:41 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: USA showered by a watery comet ~11,000 years ago, ending the Golden Age of man in America
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/briefs/20050926/mammoth_02.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

AKHENATEN/TUTANKHAMUN

Pages: 1 ... 70 71 72 73 74 75 [76] 77 78   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: AKHENATEN/TUTANKHAMUN  (Read 61079 times)
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1125 on: June 23, 2009, 08:51:30 am »



Jewel of the Nile:
 
An ornate breast plate featuring potent Egyptian symbols is one of the pieces not to be missed in “Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs,” which is opening Saturday at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.

(Courtesy photo)









                                                               The King Tut mystique






By: Leslie Katz
Examiner Staff Writer
06/23/09
SAN FRANCISCO

— Come early and come often. That’s one tip Fine Arts Museums Director John Buchanan has for visitors to the big King Tut exhibit opening Saturday at San Francisco’s de Young Museum.

“It’s likely to be an experience best enjoyed more than once,” says Buchanan, who’s been working on the highly anticipated “Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs” show since he took the museum’s top post more than three years ago. 

He points to differences between this newly organized, expanded exhibition and the one that took The City by storm 30 years ago.

In 1979, there were 50 works of art from Tut’s tomb; now, there are 130 artifacts and items from tombs of  Tut and members of his immediate family.

“There’s more of a textural understanding of King Tut as a person; we know more about him now,” says Buchanan of the boy who ruled Egypt from 1333 to 1324 B.C., and who has intrigued humans since British archeologist Howard Carter uncovered his burial place in 1922.

For example, Buchanan says, as a result of DNA and other modern technology, “We might suspect that Tut died from breaking a leg, something we would not have known in 1979.”

Buchanan sees something new each time he explores the exhibition, but points to two pieces that particularly appeal to him. 

The first is subtle — a fragment of a stone balustrade from a royal palace in Amarna depicting Akhenaten praying to the sun.

“Rays of light are coming down, there’s the symbol of the ankh — it’s breathtaking,” Buchanan says. “Don’t miss it.”

In contrast, there’s a magnificent jeweled breast plate that was found in Tut’s mummy.

“It’s a tour de force of goldsmithing,” he says. “Each motif is about life in the afterworld. It’ll make your mouth drop open.”

The exhibit-as-phenomenon stems from the fact that the young ruler has an aura and mystique unmatched among figures in Western civilization. The fact that Tut came to power at age 9, and died an enigmatic, sudden death in his teens, fuels the ongoing fascination.

Buchanan says the show’s popularity can in part be explained through its connection to humans’ universal fascination with death, and thoughts about the afterlife.

Among the biggest challenges of the huge project, Buchanan says,   has been to secure funding so that San Francisco sixth-graders can see the exhibit for free.

As for fun, behind-the-scenes anecdotes, Buchanan believes the best will come with the arrival of Zahi Hawass, TV personality and secretary general of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities.

“He’s quite a man — the Indiana Jones of Egypt,” Buchanan says. “I’m sure he’ll have some stories.”



lkatz@sfexaminer.com
« Last Edit: June 25, 2009, 11:42:35 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1126 on: June 25, 2009, 11:39:07 am »

Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1127 on: June 27, 2009, 11:15:19 am »









                                              Tut mystery revealed — almost






By: Brent Begin
SFExaminer
06/24/09   

It’s a 3,000-year-old mystery that has eluded Egyptologists since the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb,
and now San Franciscans may be the first to know what really killed the Boy King.

Zahi Hawass, director of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities and an authority on all things Tut,
told a crowd at the de Young Museum on Wednesday that he has developed a new theory as to how
Tutankhamun died.

Scholars recently said he died from gangrene after his leg was injured in a chariot accident. Previously,
researchers believed he was murdered from a blow to the head. But the debate has raged on.

“Actually, we found evidence now that he died of something else,” Hawass said, only revealing that it
had to do with 133 sticks found in the tomb.

The announcement will come in a matter of months and will not only reveal the latest theory on King Tut’s
death, but will include his never-before-seen DNA lineage. Hawass, who is also working on a laser scan of
the tomb in order to make an exact copy for research, said that seeing Tutankhamun for the first time
changed his life.

“It was the most beautiful moment of my life, meeting face to face with King Tut,” Hawass said.

Thirty years ago, a smaller exhibit drew massive crowds in San Francisco. But the money raised for that
tour went into the pockets of the organizers. This time, much of the proceeds will go to conserving
antiquities in Egypt, Hawass said.

Mayor Gavin Newsom remembered Wednesday how he waited in line as a child at the old de Young
Museum for the exhibit and was impacted by the experience.

“I think that’s incredibly important because I think that impact is a big part of the reason I am still here,”
Newsom said, recalling how he returned to The City after living in Marin County.

“Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs” opens Saturday and runs till March 28.



bbegin@sfexaminer.com
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1128 on: June 28, 2009, 11:34:01 am »












                                            King Tut exhibit opens to the masses






Janny Hu,
SFChronicle Staff Writer
Sunday, June 28, 2009

For Anita Jackson, it was all about the eyes. She stepped forward for a closer look at the gilded coffin of Tjuya, an ancient Egyptian priestess, and those orbs of blue glass, obsidian and calcite seemed to stare right back.


"It just takes my breath away," Jackson said softly. "I've waited for years to see this, and it's amazing, the attention to detail in 1300 B.C.

"I mean, her eyes - they were looking at me and wanting to tell me a story. I want to hear her story."

The 52-year-old San Francisco resident was among the thousands who descended upon the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum on Saturday as "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of Pharaohs" was opened to the public. Roughly 300 visitors were let in the doors every half hour.

And 30 years after record-setting crowds visited the original King Tut exhibit, the story of Egypt's boy king remains a major draw in San Francisco.

Jon Rhodin was first in line about an hour before the museum opened at 9 a.m. After seeing the show here in 1979, he brought his wife and daughters back for his encore, and none left disappointed.

"I'm reminded of how much better it is in real life than in pictures," said Rhodin, 47.

"You kind of get that sense of awe," added his wife, Maureen.

As visitors filed through the museum Saturday, there seemed to be something for all ages.

Four generations of Laura Gaines' family have now been through the Tut shows in the city. Gaines, 60, saw the original exhibit with her mother and daughter, and returned Saturday with three grandchildren.

Aliyah Ellis, 7, wanted to know what the canopic jar of Queen Kiya was for.

"What they did was put body parts in it," explained Gaines, who visited Egypt four years ago. "Maybe lungs or a liver."

"Golden Age" will be at the de Young for the next nine months, and while it lacks the pizzazz of the original exhibit - the iconic death mask and coffin are now too fragile to travel outside Egypt - it offers deeper insight into Tut's family and ancient Egyptian rituals.

An entire room is devoted to the religious revolution brought on by Akhenaten, believed to be Tut's father, and the exhibit highlights the importance of women in Egyptian society.

Mary White, who also saw the original show, appreciated the spacious layout and variety of the updated, 11-room exhibit.

"I was at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo a few years ago, and everything was crammed so tightly because there's so much," said White, 63. "I had a guide who sat us down in front of a map for most of the three hours, saying 'See this, see this.' The information here is really nice."

The new Tut exhibit features 50 objects from Tut's tomb and 80 from those of his ancestors - more than twice the number from the original show. Each of the objects comes with a detailed explanation written by Renee Dreyfus, curator of ancient art and interpretation at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

There are also lessons in reading cartouches and the mummification process, as well as photographs by Harry Burton, who documented archaeologist Howard Carter's excavations of the tomb in the 1920s.

Spencer Tsubota, 7, is still a few years away from studying the Ancient Egyptian curriculum mandated for California sixth-graders, but he has a head start on his classmates after Saturday's tour.

"Daddy, did you know there was a knife found on King Tut's waist?" said Tsubota. "Did you know that there were seven coffins inside each other before the mummy was placed in?"

"I thought it was beautiful," said Dana Tsubota, Spencer's mother. "The presentation of information was really unique and digestible, obviously, for even my 7-year-old.

"It's great exposure to an ancient period brought to life."

The opening of the exhibit - organized by National Geographic, Arts and Exhibitions International, and AEG Exhibitions, with cooperation from the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities - went smoothly, though there were a few comical glitches.

San Francisco resident Kevin McGoorty was trying to have his name printed in hieroglyphics at a vending machine just outside the gift shop, but exceeded the 12-character limit by one. McGoorty settled for a translation of his first name.

Back inside the gallery, Jackson was still in awe.

"I had no idea what I was going to see," she said. "I've watched the National Geographic specials, but to actually be a foot away is amazing."



E-mail Janny Hu
at jhu@sfchronicle.com.



This article appeared on page A - 1 of the
San Francisco Chronicle
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1129 on: July 05, 2009, 08:43:58 am »











                                                         K I N G S   O F   T H E   N I L E




                             Tut stars in striking exhibit featuring more than 100 Egyptian antiquities






Sunday,  July 5, 2009 3:39 AM
By Steve Stephens
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH
INDIANAPOLIS

-- America can't get enough King Tut.

And it's no wonder. Since 1922, when a team led by British explorer Howard Carter discovered the unspoiled, treasure-packed tomb of the pharaoh Tutankhamen, the "Boy King" has been synonymous with the mysteries
and wonders of ancient Egypt.

And now through Oct. 25, the Children's Museum of Indianapolis is playing host to the marvelous exhibit "Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs."

As the title suggests, the new exhibit, with its more than 100 artifacts, encompasses far more than just Tut.

There is no overlap between the objects in the new exhibit and "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs," a traveling exhibit that came to Chicago in 2006 and is now in San Francisco.

That exhibit focuses primarily on Tut and his family. It is almost intimate in its choice of objects. Some of Tut's personal items -- games, chairs, knives -- give visitors a sense of a living and breathing boy king.

(He died at age 18 or 19.)

The new exhibit, which opened in Atlanta, has a much broader sweep, with impressive objects -- some of
them quite monumental in size -- from throughout the millennia-long pharaonic period of Egyptian history.

Tut "is coming, not with his family, as he did three years ago, but with all of ancient Egypt and the other pharaohs," Zahi Hawass, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said at the exhibit's
opening June 26.

Hawass, who has overseen the project to perform a CAT scan on Tut's mummy, promised that major findings concerning the boy king's death and parentage will be released this summer, news that can only stoke Tut's popularity.

Entering the first gallery, visitors will be struck by the display of busts and statues of many pharaohs representing all of the pharaonic ages -- Old, Middle, Late and New kingdoms. The gallery hints of the breadth of Egyptian history, but I was impressed by the artistry displayed by the ancient Egyptian craftsmen who carved the pieces.

Among the pharaohs here is Khafre, the king whose face appears on the Sphinx (frankly, I don't see the resemblance). He is represented by an exquisite 3-foot calcite statue.

Displayed alone and, of course, dramatically lighted is a huge, breathtaking statue of Amenhotep IV, stylized
with elongated, almost impressionistic features.

But not all of the pharaonic pieces are monumental in scale.

The playful Sketch of a Princess Eating a Duck is as whimsical as it sounds, a book-sized stone lightly marked
and engraved as a trial piece to show just that.

And a small, lovingly carved stone sarcophagus that once held a cat belonging to Thutmose, the son of
Amenhotep III, brings the whole exhibit down to a personal level, at least briefly.

Still, despite the looming presence of the other pharaohs, Tut is the star of the show.

Entering the galleries dedicated to him, visitors must pass through a gauzy portico designed to re-create Carter's dig site. The darkened entrance forces a visitor's eyes to grow accustomed to the dim light, just as Carter experienced as he entered the tomb for the first time.

I was struck by a display of life-size black-and-white photos of Tut's burial coffin, positioned behind glass cases with objects from the burial so as to show where the objects -- a pectoral with three scarabs, amulets, toe and finger protectors and the like -- were originally located.

The personal is not neglected in the collection of Tut objects. Look especially for another of the boy king's games: a tiny box, like a cribbage board, of delicate ivory.

And objects of raw artistic beauty found in the tomb abound, such as an elegantly carved unguent vessel, found with traces of perfumed ointment still inside.

In the last of the 12 galleries, "Pharaoh's Fate," is a 17-foot colossal statue of Tut, still displaying a blush of the original paint around the eyes, mouth and headdress -- a fitting final act to the monumental show.

As with the Chicago exhibit, the current Tut exhibit features dramatic but appropriate lighting and music and
large, theatrical murals, videos and interpretive signage. An introductory film, narrated by Harrison Ford,
welcomes visitors who are about to pass into the exhibit. Ford also narrates the available audio tour.

Both shows were designed by Mark Lach, senior vice president of Arts and Exhibits.

"We want the exhibit to be dramatic, even theatrical, but not detract from the objects themselves,
which are the stars," Lach said.

Once again, Lach has succeeded.



sstephens@dispatch.com




"We want the exhibit to be dramatic, even theatrical, but not detract from the objects themselves."

Mark Lach
exhibition designer
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1130 on: July 08, 2009, 09:51:12 am »




             









                                IndyCar: Conquest Racing and King Tut Together Again
 


                              King Tut to be featured on #34 car at Honda Indy Toronto






INDIANAPOLIS
(July 7, 2009)

– After a successful venture together at this year’s Indianapolis 500, Conquest Racing and the Rubicon Sports Agency are thrilled to announce an extension of the partnership with the King Tut exhibition “Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs and exhibition organizers Arts and Exhibitions International to include next week’s Honda Indy Toronto.

“Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs” will make its exclusive Canadian appearance at the Art Gallery of Ontario from November 24, 2009 to April 18, 2010, marking the first time in 30 years an exhibition of King Tut’s treasures has visited Toronto. As in Indy, a golden image of the boy pharaoh will once again be featured on the cockpit of the #34 Conquest Racing car of Montreal driver Alex Tagliani with additional King Tut branding on the front wing.

“The King Tut exhibit is an extraordinary one and it’s an honor to be able to promote such a wonderful exhibition once again,” expressed Conquest Racing Team Owner Eric Bachelart. “With the exhibit heading to Toronto after its run in Indianapolis, it’s a natural fit for us to continue our partnership with Arts and Exhibitions International. I invite everyone who is in or who will be in the Toronto area when the exhibit is in town to go see it, as it’s a rare opportunity to see such magnificent ancient treasures and a unique way to learn about ancient Egyptian history.”
« Last Edit: July 08, 2009, 10:01:44 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1131 on: July 08, 2009, 09:52:59 am »




             










“We’ve already seen a swell of excitement surrounding the exhibition coming to Toronto,” said Bryan Harris, vice president of marketing and sales, Arts and Exhibitions International. “Partnering with Conquest Racing, Rubicon and Alex Tagliani for the Honda Indy Toronto helps bring the excitement of King Tut to fans in a whole new way.”

The historic collection, which is currently on display until October at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, features more than 100 artifacts from King Tut’s tomb and other ancient Egyptian sites. Additional information and ticket pre-registration is available at www.kingtut.org.

"We are delighted to have Arts and Exhibitions International back on board with their King Tut exhibit for the Toronto event,” said Jim Freudenberg of the Rubicon Sports Agency. “The month of May created a very successful platform for them with Conquest Racing and Alex and with the exhibit heading to Toronto after Indy, it makes sense that we work together again to create awareness and advance ticket sales for them."
« Last Edit: July 08, 2009, 09:58:08 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1132 on: July 08, 2009, 09:54:26 am »









ABOUT THE EXHIBITION:


On display from November 24, 2009 through April 18, 2010 at the Art Gallery of Ontario, “Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs” features striking objects from some of the most important rulers throughout 2,000 years of ancient Egyptian history, from the 4th Dynasty into the Late Period (about 2600 B.C. – 660 B.C.). Derived from a variety of contexts, including temples and royal and private tombs, most of these artifacts had never visited North America prior to this tour.  It will have made stops in Atlanta, GA and Indianapolis before appearing at the AGO.

More information about the exhibition and pre-registration for tickets is available at www.kingtut.org or www.ago.net.






ABOUT CONQUEST RACING:


Conquest Racing is amongst the longest-running, well-established open-wheel race teams in the IndyCar Series. The organization is recognized for its simple and efficient ways of doing business as well as its approach to achieving excellence in motor sports. Entering its 13th year of competition in 2009, Conquest Racing has amassed pole positions, podium finishes and race wins through its years in different racing series. The team first participated in Indy Lights from 1997 to 2001, before doing a single season in the IndyCar Series in 2002, where they claimed Rookie of the Year honors. Conquest then competed in the Champ Car World Series from 2003 up until the beginning of 2008 when the team made the transition to the newly unified IndyCar Series.



http://insidetracknews.blogspot.com/2009/07/indycar-conquest-racing-and-king-tut.html
« Last Edit: July 08, 2009, 09:55:27 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1133 on: July 08, 2009, 10:05:39 am »



ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1134 on: July 08, 2009, 10:08:23 am »




                       

                       ART GALLERY OF ONTARIO

                       Toronto, Canada
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1135 on: July 14, 2009, 10:38:25 pm »





               

                Cosmetic boxes in the shape of trussed ducks
 






Dynasty 18,
Reign of Akhenaten-Tutankhamun
ca. 1353-1327 B.C.
Ivory
« Last Edit: July 14, 2009, 10:42:04 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1136 on: July 18, 2009, 06:02:50 pm »











                                                         K I N G S   O F   T H E   N I L E




                             Tut stars in striking exhibit featuring more than 100 Egyptian antiquities






Sunday,  July 5, 2009 3:39 AM
By Steve Stephens
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH
INDIANAPOLIS

-- America can't get enough King Tut.

And it's no wonder. Since 1922, when a team led by British explorer Howard Carter discovered the unspoiled, treasure-packed tomb of the pharaoh Tutankhamen, the "Boy King" has been synonymous with the mysteries
and wonders of ancient Egypt.

And now through Oct. 25, the Children's Museum of Indianapolis is playing host to the marvelous exhibit "Tutankhamun: The Golden King and the Great Pharaohs."

As the title suggests, the new exhibit, with its more than 100 artifacts, encompasses far more than just Tut.

There is no overlap between the objects in the new exhibit and "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs," a traveling exhibit that came to Chicago in 2006 and is now in San Francisco.

That exhibit focuses primarily on Tut and his family. It is almost intimate in its choice of objects. Some of Tut's personal items -- games, chairs, knives -- give visitors a sense of a living and breathing boy king.

(He died at age 18 or 19.)

The new exhibit, which opened in Atlanta, has a much broader sweep, with impressive objects -- some of
them quite monumental in size -- from throughout the millennia-long pharaonic period of Egyptian history.

Tut "is coming, not with his family, as he did three years ago, but with all of ancient Egypt and the other pharaohs," Zahi Hawass, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said at the exhibit's
opening June 26.

Hawass, who has overseen the project to perform a CAT scan on Tut's mummy, promised that major findings concerning the boy king's death and parentage will be released this summer, news that can only stoke Tut's popularity.

Entering the first gallery, visitors will be struck by the display of busts and statues of many pharaohs representing all of the pharaonic ages -- Old, Middle, Late and New kingdoms. The gallery hints of the breadth of Egyptian history, but I was impressed by the artistry displayed by the ancient Egyptian craftsmen who carved the pieces.

Among the pharaohs here is Khafre, the king whose face appears on the Sphinx (frankly, I don't see the resemblance). He is represented by an exquisite 3-foot calcite statue.

Displayed alone and, of course, dramatically lighted is a huge, breathtaking statue of Amenhotep IV, stylized
with elongated, almost impressionistic features.

But not all of the pharaonic pieces are monumental in scale.

The playful Sketch of a Princess Eating a Duck is as whimsical as it sounds, a book-sized stone lightly marked
and engraved as a trial piece to show just that.

And a small, lovingly carved stone sarcophagus that once held a cat belonging to Thutmose, the son of
Amenhotep III, brings the whole exhibit down to a personal level, at least briefly.

Still, despite the looming presence of the other pharaohs, Tut is the star of the show.

Entering the galleries dedicated to him, visitors must pass through a gauzy portico designed to re-create Carter's dig site. The darkened entrance forces a visitor's eyes to grow accustomed to the dim light, just as Carter experienced as he entered the tomb for the first time.

I was struck by a display of life-size black-and-white photos of Tut's burial coffin, positioned behind glass cases with objects from the burial so as to show where the objects -- a pectoral with three scarabs, amulets, toe and finger protectors and the like -- were originally located.

The personal is not neglected in the collection of Tut objects. Look especially for another of the boy king's games: a tiny box, like a cribbage board, of delicate ivory.

And objects of raw artistic beauty found in the tomb abound, such as an elegantly carved unguent vessel, found with traces of perfumed ointment still inside.

In the last of the 12 galleries, "Pharaoh's Fate," is a 17-foot colossal statue of Tut, still displaying a blush of the original paint around the eyes, mouth and headdress -- a fitting final act to the monumental show.

As with the Chicago exhibit, the current Tut exhibit features dramatic but appropriate lighting and music and
large, theatrical murals, videos and interpretive signage. An introductory film, narrated by Harrison Ford,
welcomes visitors who are about to pass into the exhibit. Ford also narrates the available audio tour.

Both shows were designed by Mark Lach, senior vice president of Arts and Exhibits.

"We want the exhibit to be dramatic, even theatrical, but not detract from the objects themselves,
which are the stars," Lach said.

Once again, Lach has succeeded.



sstephens@dispatch.com




"We want the exhibit to be dramatic, even theatrical, but not detract from the objects themselves."

Mark Lach
exhibition designer
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1137 on: July 18, 2009, 06:03:37 pm »










If you go



"Tutankhamun: the Golden King and the Great Pharaohs" features more than 100 artifacts from the tomb of King Tut and other ancient Egyptian sites. Most of the artifacts have never before been on display in the United States.

The exhibit is on display at the Children's Museum of Indianapolis, 3000 N. Meridian St.




GETTING THERE

Indianapolis is about a 2 1/2 -hour drive from Columbus. Take 1-70 west to I-65 north in downtown Indianapolis. Exit at the 29th/30th streets exit. Follow 29th Street east to Illinois Street. Turn left and drive to the museum's free parking garage on the west side of Illinois Street. The museum will be to the east at 3000 N. Meridian.

CHILDREN'S MUSEUM

OF INDIANAPOLIS

Visitors who bring children will want to take some time to tour the rest of this fun museum.

The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through Labor Day. The museum is closed on Mondays from Labor Day through February.

Admission is $14.50, or $9.50 for children through age 17 and $13.50 for senior citizens 60 or older.



For information, visit www.childrens

museum.org.
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #1138 on: July 18, 2009, 06:05:39 pm »










THE TUT EXHIBIT



The King Tut exhibit is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays though Thursdays and 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through Aug. 1.

From Aug. 2 through Oct. 17, hours are 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays.

From Oct. 18 through Oct. 25 the hours are 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. The exhibit will also have several special Thursday evening showings. Some are for adults only.

From Sept. 14 through Oct. 19, the Monday showings through 1:30 p.m. are reserved for school groups.

Timed tickets to the Tut exhibit are $25, or $23 for senior citizens on Mondays through Thursdays; $30, or $27.50 for senior citizens Fridays through Sundays.

Tickets for children through age 17 are $15 any day.

Advance purchase of tickets is recommended. Information and tickets are available at 1-877-TUT-TKTS (1-877-888-8587) or at www.kingtut.org or at www.

ticketmaster.com.

Hotel packages, including VIP tickets, are available at www.

kingtuthotels.com.

INDIANAPOLIS

The capital of Indiana is a great town for visitors, with many museums and historical sites and more monuments than any American city outside Washington.

For information on things to see and do, places to stay and where to eat, contact the



Indianapolis Convention and Visitors Association

at 1-800-323-INDY (1-800-323-4639)
or www.visitindy.com.
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Qoais
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3423



« Reply #1139 on: December 20, 2009, 11:33:49 am »

Inlaid Diadem with Vulture and Cobra. Gold, glass, obsidian, carnelian, malachite, chalcedony, lapis lazuli. Dynasty 18, reign of Tutankhamun (1332–1323 B.C.). Thebes, Valley of the Kings, tomb of Tutankhamun

Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
Pages: 1 ... 70 71 72 73 74 75 [76] 77 78   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy