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the Guanches & the Mysteries of the Canary Islands

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Author Topic: the Guanches & the Mysteries of the Canary Islands  (Read 536 times)
Desiree
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« on: January 25, 2008, 11:45:33 pm »

The following is material that was originally found by Bianca, Bianca, you're the best!!  Smiley


.............When the Spanish came the Guanches showed that they knew how to fight with their primitive weapons too.

They resisted more than half a century.

Though their little shields and weapons made of wood, horn and stone weren’t successful against the conquerors in the long run, Gran Canaria was only fully under Spanish control in 1483.

The conquering of this tiny little island cost the Spanish more lives than the conquering of the whole huge realm of the Aztecs in Mexico.

The Guanches were subjugated, baptised and mixed with the new arrivals.

Nothing is left of them apart from their caves, the Stone Age findings now displayed in museums and a lot of puzzling stories.
 
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Desiree
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2008, 11:47:25 pm »





....the inhabitants of Lanzarote take much pride in considering themselves as Canarios rather than

belonging to the peninsula, what they call mainland Spain. Lanzarote being so close to the Sahara,

many Lanzaroteños even prefer to think of themselves as African rather than Spanish.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2008, 11:47:57 pm by Desiree » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2008, 11:48:37 pm »




.......They were a spiritual people. The highest mountains provided the setting for pagan rituals and

ceremonies. Engravings and religious symbols found on Mount Tindaya indicate this was one such

sacred mountain.
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2008, 11:51:12 pm »




The Guimar complex





Archaeologists still know surprisingly little about the pyramids that form the complex although excavations indicate that there was a community based around them. The complex comprises of six step pyramids, which are aligned to the East, suggesting that they were used to worship the sun. During the solstice, they are reported to line up with the sunset in a distinctive spot on the mountainous horizon.

Terraces and ceremonial pathways lead up to the pyramids from all directions. Pens or enclosures, thought by archaeologists to be used to keep sacrificial goats, are still evident. It should also be said that goats also played a part in the invocation of the Gods without always being sacrificed.

Although the Guanches appear to have believed in one supreme deity, there does seem to have been a reliance on possibly earlier beliefs, as Gods were invoked during times of calamities such as droughts. One of the methods used to ask for rain was to remove the adult goats from their kids and make them fast for three days, the bleating of the hungry young goats were thought to please the gods who would reward the people with the much needed rain.

Interestingly, the Canarian natives are known to have practiced a form of mummification known as ‘mirlado’ although this funerary practice seems to have been restricted to the highest of social classes.

There are undoubtedly parallels between the Mesoamerican cultures and the Canary Island cultures. Artefacts have been found on the islands that are almost identical to ones found in South America. On the neighbouring isle of Gran Canaria, there is a small cave named “Cueva Pintada”. What is interesting about the cave is the unique geometric paintings from the native Guanche. The paintings consist of red, black, and white squares, spirals, and triangles. Their meaning is not clear, some researchers suggest they are symbols of female fertility or the expression of religious beliefs, but they also seem strangely reminiscent of artefacts and colours and designs used in Bolivia at around that time. Tenerife and its surrounding islands were colonised by the Spanish in 1496, causing significant changes to the social, political, religious and cultural life of the aboriginal world. This Spanish colonisation resulted in a new city built over the aboriginal settlement and thus, the "Cueva Pintada" cave was lost for many generations.
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2008, 11:53:15 pm »



The Pre-hispanic country house

Once the visit to the troglodytic complex is finished,the visitors will get to a recreated space in which several pre-hispanic houses are re-build in life. The different elements that form it are reproduced, such as doors, roofs, walls, interior processings, etc. This allows to create a domestic atmosphere with accurate reflections of its content to show the constructive techniques, the decoration of the walls, and the internal organization of the houses like the bed, home, etc. On that way, the visitor will have an idea of how it was the daily life Canarian people. The information about the daily life will be completed with an audio-visual to stress the elaboration techniques of objects like ceramic, mills, tools in stone, and so on.
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2008, 11:54:09 pm »

Bedrooms

The bedrooms are used as a resting place. They were covered with branches, furs and rush mats. In most of the houses, these rooms had the walls, and sometimes the floor, painted in red.



The home

It is the central place where appear coals and ashes, that remember the consumption of food such as seeds, animal bones, fishes remains, limpets, snails and so on.







Manufactures

Inside of some houses, part of the domestic belongings were restorate. They were done by ceramic recipients to store and prepare food, mills to grind the grane, stone tools to make different jobs, vegetable fibres rush, mats and recipients, etc.



The walls

These are built in basalt and sometimes with toba sillars. Cueva Pintada was the first Canarian place where it is showed this last type of layout. The stones are fixed with a mud mortar and rock wedge.



The roof

They used joists and later these were covered with slabs on which earth and mud were mixed.
 


http://www.cuevapintada.org/cueva/en/museo/caserio.php
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2008, 11:55:39 pm »



MAP OF NORTHERN GRAN CANARIA.

Galdar is the loction of the "Painted Cave"


"T H E   P A I N T E D   C A V E"   O F   G R A N   C A N A R I A


 La Cueva Pintada (Painted Cave) > Discovery

I
 

The discovery of the Painted Cave


Although agricultural work carried out in 1862 to cultivate prickly pears to harvest cochineal led to the fortuitous discovery of the Painted Cave, it was not until 1873 that the cave was officially discovered.

It was in 1873 that José Ramos Orihuela got into the chamber through a narrow gap in the roof.

Once in there, he saw a collection of geometric paintings on the walls which led to the naming of the cave as the Painted Cave. This name was successfully adopted and remains the name today. From the moment of its discovery, the painted cave became a place of visit for all scholars and researchers interested in the island's pre-Hispanic history.

In 1876, Chil y Naranjo included a brief mention of this event in in their "Estudios".

In 1884, Diego Ripoche contributed great detail about the discovery, writing in his works that, "Some corpses, pots and other objects were found in the cave but enthusiasts have taken them."

Also in 1884, Olivia Stone visited the site she insisted that the Council take over the site in order to clean it and allow access to the public.

In 1887, the French anthropologist René Verneau visited the cave and wrote a detailed description of the singularity and the careful execution of each of the multi-coloured panels.

At the end of the 19th Century certain members of society stood up and stressed the extraordinary relevance of this discovery and the need to conserve it. The feature writer Batlluri y Lorenzo launched a desperate plea for the protection of the Painted Cave under the title "My Last Attempt" in his column in the magazine "El Museo Canario".

Throughout the 20th Century the institutional neglect of the cave was still under scrutiny, but it's from 1967 onwards when the press campaign in favour of the restoration of the cave began, due to historians such as Celso Martín de Guzmán y Elías Serra Ráfols.

Faced with the progressive deterioration of the paintings, the General Commission of Archeological Excavations undertook works to protect the paintings and to isolate humidity which was affecting the paintings in 1970. They also began work to clean up and clear out the cave which then led to the discovery of a group of caves surrounding the painted cave which formed a unique group.

The lack of information available about the pre-Hispanic settlements, together with the lack of forethought and no reaction towards the discovered that were being made at the time of these works, provoked the destruction of a very important part of this group, of which only a few scarce materials were collected due to the kindness of some of the locals who had rescued them from the rubble.

This intervention together with the building of an architectural enclosure which aimed to protect the cave and ultimately open it to the public. In 1972 it was declared a Historical-Artistic Monument.

The first systematic investigative work on the group of caves was carried out by Antonio Beltrán and José Miguel Alzola, published in 1974. This study includes the first colour photos and the most accurate drawings done to date, which without a doubt contributed to the diffusion/broadcasting of the archaeological site between the specialists.

The first signs that the paintings were deteriorating were noticed just eight years after the caves had opened to the public in 1972. The irrigation of the fields around the caves and the inadequate architectural enclosure and the lack of planning of visits led to an excessive humidity and an increase in the temperature inside the chamber.

In spite of certain changes that improved the ventilation of the cave, the biggest problem was still the continuous irrigation filtrations and the aggression of the fertiliser chemicals dissolved in the water. It was decided therefore to take over the neighbouring fields in order to get rid of the plantations. These circumstances together meant that the decision had to be made to close the cave to the public in October 1982.

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This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean. But afterwards there occurred violent earthquakes and floods; and in a single day and night of misfortune all your warlike men in a body sank into the earth, and the island of Atlantis in like manner disappeared in the depths of the sea.
Bianca
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« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2008, 09:17:25 pm »







QUOTE:



".............When the Spanish came the Guanches showed that they knew how to fight with their primitive weapons too.

They resisted more than half a century.

Though their little shields and weapons made of wood, horn and stone weren’t successful against the conquerors in the long run, Gran Canaria was only fully under Spanish control in 1483.

The conquering of this tiny little island cost the Spanish more lives than the conquering of the whole huge realm of the Aztecs in Mexico.

The Guanches were subjugated, baptised and mixed with the new arrivals.

Nothing is left of them apart from their caves, the Stone Age findings now displayed in museums and a lot of puzzling stories. "




When I come upon these accounts, Desi, and that's often, I either want to scream and cry or

I just sit here too numb by the horror to even mourn for them........



It's no wonder that


"....the inhabitants of Lanzarote take much pride in considering themselves as Canarios rather than

belonging to the peninsula, what they call mainland Spain. Lanzarote being so close to the Sahara,

many Lanzaroteños even prefer to think of themselves as African rather than Spanish."



Some day, maybe not in my lifetime, I hope they regain their independence.

Blessings upon them!!!
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 09:23:55 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #8 on: January 28, 2008, 09:33:38 pm »








And one more thing they want to take away from them:


                                              THE PYRAMIDS OF GUIMAR


Those fanatical Spaniard 'fundies' can't accept that Heathens could build any structures like
that and try to claim that their settlers built them, to celebrate "St. John's Day" or some
such foolishness.


The Spanish are extremely "devout": 

One of them is the founder of the notorious and nefarious


                                                     O P U S   D E I


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Bianca
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« Reply #9 on: January 28, 2008, 09:43:15 pm »







SEE:



Spanish Cover-Up? - The Guanches of the Canary Islands


http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,5919.0.html
« Last Edit: January 28, 2008, 09:44:58 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #10 on: January 28, 2008, 10:32:34 pm »







There is also a lot more about the Guanches in:



                                          MOROCCO AND EASTERN ATLANTIS



http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,3238.630.html
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