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Twin Peaks

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Author Topic: Twin Peaks  (Read 5885 times)
Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2007, 11:36:55 pm »



Laura Palmer

Nickname: "Blue Eyes"
Birth date: 7/22/72
Sign: Cancer
Likes: Potato pancakes with creamed corn topping
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Sheryl Lee

Accomplishments:
For my twelfth dirthday, I got a pony, who I named Troy. I took riding lessons every Saturday for two years. Everyone was so proud of me when I won a Blue Ribbon at the National Riding and Jumping Derby. I was crowned Twin Peaks High School Prom Queen.

Strengths:
I love to try new things - especially outdoor activities. James was teaching me to ride a motorcycle. I'm really getting to be pretty good at racing around curves.

Weaknesses:
I'm so afraid of BOB..


http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/tpcard14.html
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #31 on: November 11, 2007, 11:41:14 pm »


Leland Palmer is a fictional character played by Ray Wise on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks, and in the prequel feature filmTwin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.

Leland and his family (wife Sarah and daughter Laura) have always been well-known figures in the town of Twin Peaks; they seem to be the perfect family. When Laura is murdered, Leland’s psychological foundations begin to crumble. After her arrival, Madeleine Ferguson, Laura’s cousin (and spitting image), is of great help to him in learning how to deal with his daughter’s death.

It is eventually revealed that, as a boy, Leland met a strange neighbour who turned out to be a demonic entity named BOB, who would possess him throughout his life. As an adult, he molests and rapes Laura throughout her teens, all the while controlled by BOB. As time wears on, the strain of his dual personality starts to have a noticeable effect on his appearance; Leland's hair turns completely white.

Leland is eventually exposed as the murderer of both his daughter and his niece, and arrested by FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper and Sheriff Harry Truman. He dies in custody following his bizarre interrogation on the night of his arrest. BOB takes control of Leland and forces him to ram his own head into the wall. At the moment of his death, Leland remembers the crimes he committed under BOB's control. He sees a vision of his daughter Laura as he dies. As Cooper explains to the widowed Sarah in the following episode, it was probably Laura forgiving him and welcoming him into the afterlife.

In the final episode of the series, Cooper encounters a grinning doppelganger of Leland in the Black Lodge, who says “I did not kill anybody.” At the episode's conclusion, it is implied that in an ironic twist, Cooper himself has now become a new host for BOB.




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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #32 on: November 11, 2007, 11:45:34 pm »


Albert Rosenfield is a fictional character in the cult television series Twin Peaks, portrayed by veteran actor Miguel Ferrer. Rosenfield is an FBI Agent and forensics expert brought in to apply his extraordinary forensic skills to the case of Laura Palmer's murder, and the linked murders and violent events.

Albert quickly made fans among viewers, if not townspeople, with his extremely sarcastic and wittily abrasive manner.

Rosenfield alienated the Twin Peaks sheriff's department relatively quickly, mocking Andy, and enraging Sheriff Harry S. Truman to the point where Truman lost his temper and punched Rosenfield. He also rowed with Doc Hayward, and was very disparaging about the capabilities of the local police and medical facilities in Twin Peaks generally, showing respect only to his FBI colleagues.

A later appearance, and another conflict with Sheriff Truman, led to an emotional moment where Rosenfield exposed a sensitive and peace-loving side, seemingly at odds with his acerbic surface persona and to the complete shock of the sheriff and viewers alike. Such complex, contradictory characters were typical of Twin Peaks and the works of David Lynch in general.

"While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I am a naysayer and a hatchetman in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and will gladly take another because I choose to live my life in the company of Gandhi and King. My concerns are global. I reject, absolutely, revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method, is love. I love you Sheriff Truman"



« Last Edit: November 12, 2007, 12:22:29 am by Jami Ferrina » Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2007, 11:48:26 pm »


Audrey Horne is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Sherilyn Fenn. She is a femme fatale character.

Born August 24, 1972, Audrey fits the image of a poor little rich girl. She is able to get anything she wants except for her father's love. Benjamin Horne, the town's business magnate, gave that love to deceased Laura Palmer, both physically and emotionally. Audrey is labelled a troublemaker and lives up to that expectation.

Angelo Badalamenti composed the leitmotif Audrey's Dance for the character.

In a memorable scene in the Twin Peaks pilot, Audrey blew her father's business deal worth millions by interrupting a meeting of Norwegian investors and telling them about Laura's murder. Audrey appears emotionally upset although she and Laura were not friends. She says she "kind of loved Laura" because she taught and looked after her mentally retarded brother Johnny.

In later episodes, she develops a crush on Special Agent Dale Cooper and helps him investigate Laura's murder by infiltrating the brothel One-Eyed Jack's.

In the show's second season, writers planned a serious relationship between Cooper and Horne, but Kyle MacLachlan, who played Cooper, vetoed it, arguing that Cooper would not become involved with a high school-age woman.  Audrey was paired with other characters such as Bobby Briggs and John Justice Wheeler.

In the final episode, Audrey is engaged in an act of civil disobedience at the bank where a bomb trap goes off near Audrey, Andrew Packard, Pete Martell and the banker. The bomb, being an ironic "reward" of a long treasure hunt, was planted by the late Thomas Eckhardt. Sherilyn Fenn stated in an interactive chat on America Online that had there been a third season of the show, her character was slated to have survived the explosion.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #34 on: November 11, 2007, 11:49:43 pm »



Audrey Horne

Nickname: "Princess"
Birth date: 8/15/72
Sign: Leo
Likes: Saddle shoes, wool sweaters, and skirts
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Sherilyn Fenn

Accomplishments:
I am the president of the Twin Peaks High School French Club and was voted "Best Dressed" in the senior class.

Strengths:
I believe I am extremely inquisitive and adventurous and have a great deal of personal charm. Of course, my neat little trick with a cherry stem adds to my desirability and mysteriousness.

Weaknesses:
Some people say I am spoiled, moody, and naive - they are just jealous.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #35 on: November 11, 2007, 11:55:50 pm »


Ben Horne

Benjamin Horne (played by Richard Beymer) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 prime-time ABC series Twin Peaks. A fervent capitalist, his business schemes lead Twin Peaks to a number of potential disasters. He is the father of Audrey, whom he tends to leave to her own devices, and Johnny who is severely mentally handicapped. He has a very close relationship with his brother Jerry. He is married to Sylvia, who is not featured in the series very much.

As well as running the hotel, and the local department store, Horne also runs a brothel called “One Eyed Jacks,” that is a major location for several plot-lines throughout the series.

As the series begins, Ben is seen to be cold-blooded, ruthless, and criminal. While having an affair with Catherine Packard Martell, owner of the Packard Mill, he is plotting with Catherine’s sister in law Josie Packard, but he is manipulating both of them as part of his plan to obtain the Packard Mill, and Ghostwood, the land on which it stands. Ben, Hank Jennings, and Josie all seem to have been involved in the death of Catherine’s brother Andrew (Josie’s husband, and the original owner of the mill). In addition to playing Catherine and Josie against each other, Ben is also involved in criminal enterprises with Leo Johnson, Hank Jennings, the Renault brothers, and Black Rose. Ultimately, Ben orders Leo Johnson to burn down the mill, orders Hank Jennings to ensure Catharine will be killed in the fire, and finally orders Hank to kill Leo.

Though the mill burns, it is not entirely destroyed. Catherine disappears, but no body is found, and Leo is put into a coma, but does not die. Ben’s plans are complicated by Catharine’s not signing her insurance policy, and by his being arrested for Laura Palmer’s murder.

Things soon to begin to unravel for Ben as the second season progresses. Following Audrey’s abduction by Jean Renault, Ben was forced to deal with the knowledge his daughter was aware of his more illegal business practices. Though never suspected of the many crimes he was responsible for, he was arrested for the one crime he did not commit, and as a result, his plans for the Ghostwood development fell through. Traumatized by this string of misfortunes, Ben suffered a severe nervous breakdown. As a result, he comes to believes he is fighting the American Civil War in which the South emerges victorious, a delusion that takes the combined efforts of Dr. Lawrence Jacoby, Audrey, his brother Jerry, and Bobby Briggs for him to ultimately snap out of. Following this, he becomes an environmentalist (that is implied at being a front for ruining Catherine Martell’s plans for the Ghostwood project), but overall he does appear to making a genuine effort to “be good.”

As the series draws to a close, Ben suggests to Donna Hayward that he might in fact be her biological father, a suspicion that had been slowly growing in Donna’s mind. This immediately draws him into conflict with Doc Hayward, and Donna’s mother, Eileen Hayward. Both men come to blows in the Hayward family home in the last episode, with Ben suffering a severe blow to the head on a fireplace as a result of the violent confrontation. The full extent of this injury, and even if it was indeed fatal, is unclear.

The surname 'Horne' implies a reference to the act of cuckoldry, as in William Wycherley's play The Country Wife, in which a character named Harry Horner sleeps with married women. The horns have a symbolic reference to old European rituals in which a cuckolded husband would be mocked by a crowd wearing horns.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #36 on: November 12, 2007, 12:00:54 am »


Donna Hayward

Donna Hayward is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Lara Flynn Boyle. Donna was portrayed by Moira Kelly in the movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me.

Donna was the best friend of Laura Palmer, and after her death she was obsessed with finding out who killed her and why, with the help of James Hurley, Laura's secret boyfriend and Donna's new love interest, and Madeleine Ferguson, the look-a-like cousin of Laura.

Donna's father is the town doctor, known simply as Doc Hayward, and her mother is Eileen Hayward, who sits in a wheelchair and tends to the house. Donna has two sisters, Harriet and Gersten, who are seen in the series only a couple of times.

At the end of season two, it is strongly suggested that Doc Hayward might not be Donna's biological father after all, and that she is in fact be the daughter of Benjamin Horne and half-sister to Audrey Horne. However, due to the series' cancellation, this theory has not been elaborated upon. In the penultimate episode, Doc Hayward attacks Benjamin and apparently kills him.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #37 on: November 12, 2007, 12:02:47 am »



Donna Hayward

Birth date: 9/2/72
Sign: Virgo
Likes: James
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Lara Flynn Boyle

Accomplishments:
I qualified for the Twin Peaks High School Honor Roll in each of my four years. I was also voted "Most Likely to Succeed" in my senior class. It's very flattering to have received that vote of confidence from my peers. Now, I only hope that I can live up to my full potential.

Strengths:
I've always been adventurous - but careful. I guess being a doctor's daughter has taught me this instinct. When James, Maddy, and I took Laura's investigation into our own hands, that was definitely living life on the edge.

Weaknesses:
My undying friendship to Laura has caused my great pain and sorrow. I know that I'll never get over her death. I miss her so much.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #38 on: November 12, 2007, 12:05:19 am »



James Hurley

James Hurley (played by James Marshall) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He is the nephew of Big Ed and Nadine Hurley, and lives with them, due to his parents' problems. He frequently has problems with women, and is a keen motorcycle rider.

His major enemy is Bobby Briggs.

James was Laura Palmer's secret boyfriend. She went off with him secretly the night she died, and she gave him half of her heart necklace. After Laura dies, he falls in love with Donna Hayward. Donna and James bury the half necklace out in the forest to try and allay suspicion from him. He is only quiet on the outside.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #39 on: November 12, 2007, 12:10:47 am »



Big Ed Hurley

Big Ed Hurley (played by Everett McGill) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He runs the local gas station, aka "Big Ed's Gas Farm" and is an "unofficial" deputy.

He is married to Nadine, with whom he is clearly troubled. He looks after James Hurley, his nephew.

He is secretly seeing Norma Jennings, with whom he had been in love since high school.

He is also one of the Bookhouse Boys.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #40 on: November 12, 2007, 12:16:39 am »



On the set of Twin Peaks:  Fire Walk with Me
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #41 on: November 12, 2007, 12:19:32 am »



Entertainment Weekly April 6, 1990
Television: Twin Peaks

THE ARRIVAL OF DAVID LYNCH'S Twin Peaks, the most eagerly anticipated series of the season, threatens to make everything else on television this week seem irrelevant; why, not even Melissa Gilbert as a supporter of Chinese revolution in Tuesday's Forbidden Nights can top the surpassing oddness of Lynch's creation.

Twin Peaks
(ABC, Sun., April 8, 9-11 p.m.)

DIRECTOR DAVID Lynch says, "The thing is about secrets." The "thing" is Twin Peaks, the wingdingiest thing to make it onto network television in many a full moon. In an already overquoted quote about his ominous, enthralling new prime-time soap opera, Lynch has called Twin Peaks "Peyton Place meets Blue Velvet." It's that and more: It's Mayberry R.F.D. Goes Psycho; Pee-wee's Playhouse Has a Nervous Breakdown; and the first you-really-can't-miss-this show of the '90s.

At the start of Twin Peaks, the body of a young woman, wrapped in plastic, washes ashore in a small Northwestern mill village. The girl's blue-veined, death-frosted skin is in startling contrast to the lush, warm greens and blues of this verdant land.

There's a stately beauty to the way Lynch shoots the discovery of the corpse of Laura Palmer, a popular local girl, but even as you're becoming absorbed in the mystery of who killed her, Lynch and cowriter Mark Frost begin toying with their story's tone and rhythm.

The local police chief is improbably named Harry S. Truman, and he's played by Michael Ontkean, 16 years ago a rookie on The Rookies. Sheriff Truman is a pretty standard strong, silent type, but he has a gangling, neurotic deputy who collapses into racked sobbing upon seeing Laura's body. "Come on," Truman hisses disgustedly, "is this gonna happen every damn time?"

Very quickly, subplots surface: a power play for the ownership of the town's chief employer, Packard Sawmill, featuring Piper Laurie and The Last Emperor's Joan Chen; the unhappy marriage of Ed (Everett McGill), owner of Ed's Gas Farm, and his eye-patched wife; the romances and rivalries among the town's bored, looking-for-trouble teens. These are time-warped hoods who sneer, "Hey, it's happy hour in France" and swig whiskey from a flask at 8 in the morning. Lynch makes an erotic fetish out of closeups of the saddle shoes worn by a sloe-eyed bad girl played by Sherilyn Fenn.



So good at being bad: Twin Peaks' Sherilyn Fenn

Meanwhile, Angelo Badalamenti's beautifully tense, overwrought music fills the soundtrack, and vaguely familiar faces loom up here and there: The Mod Squad's Peggy Lipton as a sassy coffee-shop owner; West Side Story's Russ Tamblyn as a randy old goat of a psychiatrist.

Best of all, there's Kyle MacLachlan, looking like a young, demented Robert Vaughn, as FBI agent Dale Cooper. MacLachlan, who was in Lynch's Blue Velvet, here does a witty variation on the zombie-alien cop he played in the neglected 1987 B-movie The Hidden.

MacLachlan's Cooper seems like a goofball at first, walking around dictating his most banal thoughts into a tape recorder. ("Had a piece of cherry pie that was incredible!")

But then we see what Sheriff Truman sees: that Cooper's distracted dopiness is a cover for a brain working furiously, taking in every piece of information the world offers him and using it to solve his cases. MacLachlan has to deliver some of Lynch and Frost's most parodic, TV-spoofing dialogue, but he pulls it off with a devilish earnestness.

Will Twin Peaks be a hit? Not a chance in hell. (Well, maybe in hell...) Soaked corpses, sobbing deputies, and muttering G-men... it's all very unsettling, as is Lynch's refusal to signal the emotion he wants the viewer to feel in any given scene.

But strong emotions are very close to the surface in Twin Peaks, and that may also make viewers uncomfortable. When Laura's mother learns her daughter is dead, she doesn't whimper and sniffle the way most prime-time grievers do; she emits a gut-wrenching moan and then wails so loudly the walls of her home seem to shake. It's a shocking moment, moving and repellent at the same time.

Much as I enjoyed being unsettled-thrown for Lynch's loop - I also recognize that that's not what most people watch TV for, and I'm guessing that a hefty percentage of the millions who'll tune in out of curiosity won't make it past Peaks' grim first 15 minutes. Groans of "Honey, we're missing Married... With Children for this?" will resound throughout this great land, as remote-control trigger-fingers get itchy.

Cynical, anti-art NBC Entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff has phrased it perfectly: "I probably would want to live in a country where something like [Twin Peaks] could work," he told The Washington Post, "but I suspect it will be a tough road for them."

A show like this also invites all the standard philistine complaints - " It's boring"; "It's pretentious"; "Who wants to think when you're watching television?" - some of which I fully expect to hear from TV critics trying to break away from the pack.

But Twin Peaks is different from most other shows that have striven to be innovative, from Larry Gelbart's United States to Jay Tarses' The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd. For one thing, Peaks is good - engrossing and funny; for another, it doesn't carry those shows' stink of smugness.

David Lynch isn't condescending to television. While Twin Peaks shares with his feature films an eerie airiness and sinister non sequiturs, it has its own video style.

Lynch has crafted the two-hour pilot around its commercial breaks, making what he has called "little movies," segments that build and climax before an ad dispels the mood. Twin Peaks makes you aware of just how slapped together most TV entertainment is; its calm, deliberate eccentricity is a virtue in itself.

ABC continues to be the only network taking bold chances. Elvis may or may not be dead, but, for seven more hour-long episodes starting April 12, the bodies and the non sequiturs will pile up, eccentricities will deepen into dementia, and Twin Peaks will live. Be there. A+

Copyright 1990 Entertainment Weekly

http://www.lynchnet.com/tp/articles/ew1990f.html
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« Reply #42 on: November 12, 2007, 12:26:19 am »

Great fun to revisit all of this!  A huge favorite in my family...

CREEPY.....







Bob, Bob, Bob. All his scenes scare me. Especially at the end. Or when Laura Palmer walks into her room and sees Bob emerging from behind her dresser, and she screams, and he screams, and the camera shows a close-up of the inside of his mouth...

And talk about creepy!!!!

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Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2007, 12:29:47 am »


Norma Jennings


Norma Jennings (played by Peggy Lipton) is a character on Twin Peaks. She owns the Double R Diner, which she runs with Shelly Johnson, a good friend of hers, and is organizer of meals on wheels, formerly with Laura Palmer. She is a former Miss Twin Peaks, and her birthname is "Blackburn", as in her sister Annie. It is implied she may have some kind of Roman Catholic background.

She is the lover of Big Ed Hurley, and married to Hank Jennings, who is a paroled prisoner. Her mother is a food critic, and the two have a bad relationship. She does not care for Hank, but she adores Ed. She feels that she married the wrong man, and now she is stuck with him. She finds it difficult to trust Hank, because he is a criminal, and he has let her down in the past. What she would really like to do is to divorce Hank and marry Ed, but events continually prevent her from doing this.

The neon sign outside the diner says RR Diner, which may stand for Railroad Diner, in reference to its location.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #44 on: November 12, 2007, 12:31:30 am »

Yes, they just released the DVD of it last week and I am watching the series.  Brings back memories of when I was growing up!  Too bad they cancelled it, it could have at least lasted two more seasons.
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