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AL GORE WINS NOBEL PEACE PRIZE!!!

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Bianca
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« on: October 12, 2007, 06:51:09 am »










                                             Al Gore, UN body win Nobel Peace Prize





By DOUG MELLGREN,
Associated Press Writer

 OSLO, Norway - Former Vice President Al Gore and the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change won the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize Friday for their efforts to spread awareness of man-made climate change and lay the foundations for counteracting it.
 
"I am deeply honored to receive the Nobel Peace Prize," Gore said. "We face a true planetary emergency. The climate crisis is not a political issue, it is a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity."

Gore's film "An Inconvenient Truth," a documentary on global warming, won an Academy Award this year and he had been widely expected to win the prize.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee said global warming, "may induce large-scale migration and lead to greater competition for the earth's resources. Such changes will place particularly heavy burdens on the world's most vulnerable countries. There may be increased danger of violent conflicts and wars, within and between states."

Gore said he would donate his share of the $1.5 million that accompanies the prize to the Alliance for Climate Protection, a bipartisan nonprofit organization devoted to conveying the urgency of solving the climate crisis.

"His strong commitment, reflected in political activity, lectures, films and books, has strengthened the struggle against climate change," the Nobel citation said. "He is probably the single individual who has done most to create greater worldwide understanding of the measures that need to be adopted."

Gore supporters have been raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for petition drives and advertising in an effort to lure him into the Democratic presidential primaries. One group, Draftgore.com, ran a full-page open letter to Gore in Wednesday's New York Times, imploring him to get into the race.

Gore, 59, has been coy, saying repeatedly he's not running for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008, without ever closing that door completely.

He was the Democratic nominee in 2000 and won the general election popular vote. However, Gore lost the electoral vote to George W. Bush after a legal challenge to the Florida result that was decided by the Supreme Court.

Peace Prize committee chairman Ole Danbolt Mjoes said a possible Gore presidential run was not his concern.

"I want this prize to have everyone ... every human being, asking what they should do," Mjoes said. "What he (Gore) decides to do from here is his personal decision."

Mjoes reiterated repeatedly that the prize was not aimed at singling out the Bush administration and its position on global warming.

"A peace prize is never a criticism of anything. A peace prize is a positive message and support to all those champions of peace in the world."

The last American to win the prize or share it was former President Carter in 2002.

The Nobel committee cited the Panel on Climate Change for two decades of scientific reports that have "created an ever-broader informed consensus about the connection between human activities and global warming."

Members of the panel, a network of 2,000 scientists, were surprised that it was chosen to share the honor with Gore, a spokeswoman said.

"We would have been happy even if he had received it alone because it is a recognition of the importance of this issue," spokeswoman Carola Traverso Saibante said.

The panel forecast this year that all regions of the world will be affected by climate warming and that a third of the Earth's species will vanish if global temperatures continue to rise until they are 3.6 degrees above the average temperature in the 1980s and '90s.

"Decisive action in the next decade can still avoid some of the most catastrophic scenarios the IPCC has forecast," said Yvo de Boer, the U.N.'s top climate official.

He urged consensus among the United States and other countries on attacking the problem.

Climate change has moved high on the international agenda this year. The U.N. climate panel has been releasing reports, talks on a replacement for the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on climate are set to resume and on Europe's northern fringe, where the awards committee works, there is growing concern about the melting Arctic.

Jan Egeland, a Norwegian peace mediator and former U.N. undersecretary for humanitarian affairs, also called climate change more than an environmental issue.

"It is a question of war and peace," said Egeland, now director of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs in Oslo. "We're already seeing the first climate wars, in the Sahel belt of Africa." He said nomads and herders are in conflict with farmers because the changing climate has brought drought and a shortage of fertile lands.

The committee often uses the coveted prize to cast the global spotlight on a relatively little-known person or cause. Since Gore already has a high profile some had doubted that the committee would bestow the prize on him "because he does not need it."

Gore's climate change effort has had its share of criticism.

A British judge said in a ruling published Wednesday that some assertions in his documentary were not supported by scientific evidence. The case involved a challenge from a school official who did not want the film shown to students.

The ruling detailed High Court Judge Michael Burton's decision this month to allow screenings of the film in English secondary schools. The judge said that written guidance to teachers, designed to ensure Gore's views are not presented uncritically, must accompany the screenings.

In recent years, the Nobel committee has broadened the interpretation of peacemaking and disarmament efforts outlined by Swedish industrialist Alfred Nobel in creating the prize with his 1895 will. The prize now often also recognizes human rights, democracy, elimination of poverty, sharing resources and the environment.

Two of the past three prizes have been untraditional, with the 2004 award to Kenya environmentalist Wangari Maathai and last year's award to Bangladeshi economist Muhammad Yunus and his Grameen Bank, which makes to micro-loans to the country's poor.

The prize also includes a gold medal and a diploma.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2007, 06:58:21 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2007, 06:55:18 am »






SOME GREAT NEWS TO WAKE UP TO, FINALLY!!!!
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Bianca
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2007, 07:42:41 am »








I hope we can allow ourselves to enjoy it for a
few days before  new battles begin.




"Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul,
And sings the tune--without the words,
And never stops at all,

And sweetest in the gale is heard;
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little bird
That kept so many warm.

I've heard it in the chillest land,
And on the strangest sea;
Yet, never, in extremity,
It asked a crumb of me."

                  Emily D
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Allison
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2007, 08:45:08 am »

Finally!!!!
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2007, 08:48:19 am »

More:

Al Gore and UN climate body win Nobel Peace Prize
by Alice Ritchie
58 minutes ago




The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Peace Prize Committee Ole Danbolt Mjoes shows a picture of 2007 Nobel peace prize laureate, former US Vice President Al Gore during the announcement of the winner in Oslo. Gore and the UN's top climate panel shared the Nobel Peace Prize, in a major boost to the international campaign for action against global warming.(AFP/Daniel Sannum Lauten) 


OSLO (AFP) - US vice president Al Gore and the UN's top climate panel shared the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, in a major boost to the international campaign for action against global warming.

 
Gore, who has reinvented himself as a climate warrior since failing in his bid to become US president in 2000, said he was "deeply honored" by the award and spoke of the "planetary emergency" brought about by climate change.

The 2007 prize was jointly awarded to Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) -- a UN body of about 3,000 experts which has highlighted the human role in steadily mounting global temperatures.

The Norwegian Nobel committee cited the recipients "for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change."

The committee said it wanted to contribute to efforts "to reduce the threat to the security of mankind. Action is necessary now, before climate change moves beyond man's control."

Gore, 59, is bound to attract most of the attention when the winners claim their 10-million-Swedish-kronor (1.5-million-dollar, 1.08-million-euro) prize on December 10.

Bill Clinton's former vice president has helped put global warming at the top of the international agenda with his Oscar-winning 2006 film "An Inconvenient Truth", based on years of lectures on the subject.

The Nobel committee described Gore as "probably the single individual who has done most to create greater worldwide understanding of the measures that need to be adopted".

Gore said after hearing the news: "We face a true planetary emergency. The climate crisis is not a political issue, it is a moral and spiritual challenge to all of humanity."

He added that the prize was "even more meaningful" as it was shared with the IPCC, "whose members have worked tirelessly and selflessly for many years".

Some experts say Gore's campaign, the Oscar and now the Nobel Peace Prize could persuade him to make a last minute bid to secure the Democratic nomination for the 2008 US presidential election.

Gore himself discounts the idea, and asked about the possibility Friday, Ole Danbolt Mjoes, head of the five-member Nobel committee, said he was "not very interested" in what the prizewinners do next.

The IPCC, set up in 1988, is tasked with giving policymakers a summary of the latest knowledge about climate change.

Its fourth report, published this year, gave the starkest view yet on the challenge, warning that climate change was already on the march and that rising temperatures fuelled the risk of drought, flooding and violent storms.

The committee said the IPCC had "created an ever-broader informed consensus about the connection between human activities and global warming", and had worked "to achieve greater certainty as to the scale of the warming".

IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri said winning the Nobel Peace Prize would add a "sense of urgency" to the fight against global warming.

"I expect this will bring the subject to the fore and will hopefully create greater awareness and a sense of urgency," he told a cheering crowd of dozens of co-workers and journalists outside his office in New Delhi.

"Climate change threatens to disrupt stable economic activities all over the world and it also threatens to disrupt social stability."

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said this year's award put the fact that climate change is now affecting the world "beyond doubt".

The Nobel committee's decision to award the peace prize to a climate campaigner continues the trend of broadening its scope beyond the traditional fields of conflict prevention and resolution and disarmament.

Over the years, winners have been honoured for humanitarian aid work and human rights. More recently, Kenyan ecologist Wangari Maathai won in 2002, and Bangladeshi microcredit pioneer Muhammad Yunus and his Grameen Bank won last year for their fight against poverty.

"Indications of changes in the Earth's future climate must be treated with the utmost seriousness, and with the precautionary principle uppermost in our minds," the committee said in a statement.

It warned extensive climate changes may alter and threaten people's living conditions, cause large-scale migration and increase competition for natural resources, all of which would impact particularly on vulnerable countries.

"There may be increased danger of violent conflicts and wars, within and between states," it said.

The peace laureates will receive a gold medal and a diploma at a formal ceremony in Oslo on December 10, the anniversary of the death in 1896 of the prize's creator, Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite Alfred Nobel.

Other favourites for the prize, which was first awarded in 1901, this year included Canadian Inuit Sheila Watt-Cloutier, who defends the rights of Arctic people, and former Finnish president and peace mediator Martti Ahtisaari.


The Nobel Foundation website


The Nobel Peace Prize 2007"for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change"

http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/2007/
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Allison
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2007, 08:49:13 am »

Now if he'll only run!
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« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2007, 09:40:16 am »





Oh, Allison, I have such mixed emotions about THAT.  Look what happened to all the

"Good Guys":   JFK, RFK, MLK, Paul Wellstone........
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« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2007, 10:42:39 am »

Great news!  I have been excited lately about the Virgin Earth Challenge:

http://www.virginearth.com/



To encourage a viable technology which will result in the net removal of anthropogenic, atmospheric greenhouse gases each year for at least ten years without countervailing harmful effects.

Today, Sir Richard Branson and Al Gore announced the setting up of a new Global science and technology prize – The Virgin Earth Challenge – in the belief that history has shown that prizes of this nature encourage technological advancements for the good of mankind.  The Virgin Earth Challenge will award $25 million to the individual or group who are able to demonstrate a commercially viable design which will result in the net removal of anthropogenic, atmospheric greenhouse gases each year for at least ten years without countervailing harmful effects.  This removal must have long term effects and contribute materially to the stability of the Earth’s climate. 

Sir Richard also announced that he would be joined in the adjudication of the Prize by a panel of five judges - all world authorities in their respective fields:  Al Gore, Sir Crispin Tickell, Tim Flannery, Jim Hansen and James Lovelock. The panel of judges will be assisted in their deliberations by The Climate Group and Special Advisor to The Virgin Earth Prize Judges, Steve Howard (see Editors notes for biographies). (MY NOTE-SEE BIOGRAPHIES BELOW)

The timing of the announcement of the Virgin Earth Challenge was particularly apt given the recent findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes, which last week announced that temperatures on earth could increase by as much as 6.4C by the end of this Century. 

The report, the most comprehensive to date from a UN Agency detailed the catastrophe results which even seemingly small temperature raises could have on our planet:  at + 2.4C coral reefs around the world would become extinct; + 3.4C would result in the rain forests becoming deserts; an increase of + 4.4C would result in the ice caps melting and severe heat waves across the globe displacing millions; the IPCC further predicted that sea levels could rise by 5 metres if temperatures reached + 5.4C which would result in ten of millions of climate refugees. 

For the first time ever a 6.4C raise was mentioned within UN predictions. If this were to occur it would result in most of life on our planet being exterminated.

Sir Richard Branson commented:  “We all now know that something radical has got to be done to turn back the tide of global warming.  By launching the $25 million Virgin Earth Challenge, the largest ever science and technology prize to be offered in history, we want to encourage scientists and individuals from around the world to come up with a way of removing lethal carbon dioxide from the earth’s atmosphere.  By competing for this prize they will follow in the footsteps of many of history’s greatest inventors and innovators.  But in this case potentially save the planet. It is our hope and belief that the winner of The Virgin Earth Challenge will help to reverse the collision course our beautiful world is currently on.  They will not only make history but preserve history for many, many generations to come.

However, it is important to remember that there is a real possibility that no one will win this prize.  Governments, and their people, must continue to use every effort to radically reduce CO2 emissions. “

The Virgin Earth Challenge will initially be open for five years; the judges will meet annually to determine whether a design has been submitted during the previous year that in their view should win the prize and, if so, they may award the prize without waiting for the five year period to elapse.  If no winner has been selected at the end of five years, the judges may decide to roll the prize forward for a further period on the same.

Al Gore commented at today’s Press Conference:  “Carbon dioxide levels already are far above anything measured in the prior 650,000 year record, and just last week in Paris scientists gave us their strongest warning yet of the consequences of inaction.  So the dangers are clear.  But the opportunities, if we take action now, are innumerable, and Sir Richard’s initiative to stimulate exploration of this new approach to the climate crisis is important and welcome.”

James Lovelock continued:  "To escape the consequences of global heating we need far more than Kyoto, far more than renewable energy and sustainable development.  What we need is a near miracle to undo the harm that we have done.  Sir Richard Branson's hugely generous prize could sow the seeds for a miraculous invention that would let us make a sustainable retreat to that lush and comfortable world we once knew. We have all spent far too long sleepwalking towards extinction."

Sir Crispin Tickell:  “We need a significant, lasting and harmless reduction in the volume of green house gases in the atmosphere.  To this technology can make an important contribution.  This Prize is a marvellous encouragement to all who have bright and practical ideas on how best to tackle one of the major problems of our time.”

Dr James Hansen, Director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies:  “I think we have a very brief window of opportunity to deal with climate change ... no longer than a decade, at the most. This is why I am supporting the Virgin Earth Challenge as a judge – we must explore all means, both known and unknown, to help alleviate this crisis.”

Tim Flannery, author of The Weather Makers, gave a stark warning on the cost of inaction:  “If we continue as we are, humanity will so pollute our atmosphere this century that we will create another world, the likes of which has not been seen for 50 million years. And we will destroy human civilisation in the process.”

Sir Richard Branson concluded:   “We would also like to call on governments and members of the international community to join us in The Virgin Earth Challenge by matching or adding to the prize pot available to encourage the greatest number of entrants of those who could come up with a solution which could save our planet.  If the greatest minds in the world today compete, as I’m sure they will, for The Virgin Earth Challenge, I believe that a solution to the C02 problem could hopefully be found – a solution that could save our planet - not only for our children but for all the children yet to come.”

The creation of the Virgin Earth Prize is one of a number of initiatives including investment in renewable energy research, development and production as part of Virgin Group's "Gaia Capitalism" project and 3 billion dollar Clinton Initiative pledge of September 2006.

Editor’s Notes:

Sir Richard Branson comments on the use of Prizes to fuel innovation:  “History has shown that Technology Prizes have been invaluable in encouraging technological advancements and innovation in many, many areas of science and industry.  From the very first recorded prize offered by the British government in 1714, offering three financial incentives to the inventor who developed a device capable of measuring longitude within a given degree of accuracy.  The Prize, which has been immortalised in the book Longitude, was won by John Harrison, a self-educated clock maker.  Harrison was awarded £20,000 in 1773 for devising an accurate and durable chronometer. 

But prizes were not just the domain of the British; in the 18th Century the French also used Prizes as an incentive to fuel innovation.  In 1775 a 100,000 franc prize was offered to the individual who could produce an artificial form of alkali – the wining of this prize was to form the basis of the French chemical industry.    Today, vacuum packed food in our fridges and cupboards is nothing remarkable, but it may surprise some to know that it was actually a Prize offered by Napoleon in 1810 which led to Nicolas Appert coming up with a method of vacuum packing cooked food in glass bottles – it took him 15 years of experiments but in the end won him 12,000 francs!

It wasn’t long before newspapers and private sector companies became involved in setting up Prizes to encourage development in many areas.  The American automobile industry was encouraged to grow through inducements to win prizes by competing in races set up by newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune in the late 19 th Century.  Aviation and the development of long distance flying were greatly encouraged by similar prizes to those offered in America for the fledgling automobile industry. The Daily Mail prize for example, for the first flight across the Channel, was won byLouis Bleriot in 1909; and ten years later, Alcock and Brown won the Mail prize for crossing the Atlantic. Lindebergh was competing for a prize when he flew in the Spirit of St Louis, non-stop from New York to Paris in 1927. The Spitfire was the result of the Schneider trophy, which was a series of prizes for technological development. 

The most recent technological Prize was awarded in the area of space travel, and is one that I have come to know very well - the Ansari X Prize – a $10 million dollar Prize set up by Peter Diamandis and funded by the Ansari family.  The Ansari X Prize was won in 2004 by Paul Allen, Burt Rutan and Scaled Composites when they successfully flew SpaceShipOne to space and back twice within two weeks.  The technological feat of SpaceShipOne resulted in the Virgin Group licensing that technology to build five space ships and two White Knight carrier crafts and has given birth to a commercially viable space tourism industry for the future. Using the latest technology in hybrid rocket motors and next generation turbo fan engines SS2 and WK2 will be environmentally benign.”

THE JUDGES:

SIR RICHARD BRANSON

 
Once you know Richard you understand why his company is called Virgin (and recognised as such throughout the world in numerous sectors). He is a pioneer of many famous world-wide business ventures - including Virgin Music Group and Virgin Atlantic (with a multitude of first-time achievements to boot); he is also the founder of a company that has been the saviour of Britain's two most run-down rail-franchises as well as putting its considerable financial and personnel weight behind several worldwide charities facing some of the toughest challenges ever today. This incredibly revolutionary approach to life has also led to his involvement in many epic and famous world record-breaking sea, air and land ventures. In 2004 his dream of opening the world's first ever commercial Space Tourism business was realised with the launch of Virgin Galactic. Richard Branson is a committed crusader and ambassador of crucial and urgent social as well as environmental issues - a fantastic proof of this was him being awarded a knighthood in the Queen's Millennium New Year's honours list for "Services to Entrepreneurship".

 
 
AL GORE
 
Is known throughout the world as the Former Vice President of the USA. He is also (amongst others) Co-Founder of Generation Investment Management - a company committed to the new approach to Sustainable Investing. He is also an active and respected member of the Board of Directors for both Apple and Google. He is the author of "An Inconvenient Truth" - a best selling book and documentary about the history of the world. During the past 30 years he has been the leading advocate for confronting the threat of global warming.

 
 JAMES LOVELOCK
 
An independent scientist for more than forty years as well as an Honorary Visiting Fellow of Green College, University of Oxford. He was elected to the Royal Society in 1974 and was made a Companion of Honour by Queen Elizabeth II in 2003. In addition, he has received ten international awards for his work as an environmentalist; these included the Blue Planet Prize, Volvo Prize and Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society in London.
James Lovelock’s most notable scientific work is the Gaia theory, now generally accepted under the name Earth System Science, and the discovery in l972 of the CFCs in the atmosphere and their subsequent global monitoring. He is the inventor of the electron capture detector (ECD), which first alerted us to the ubiquitous distribution of pesticides and PCBs. He has throughout his career as an environmental scientist supported nuclear energy as a preferred supplier of electricity. He is the author of five books and over 200 scientific papers.

 
 TIM FLANNERY
 
Is an internationally acclaimed scientist, explorer, conservationist and author lauded by David Attenborough and Redmond O'Hanlon respectively as one of the world's greatest explorers and having "... discovered more new species than Charles Darwin." He is also Recipient of Centenary of Federation medal for his service to science and in 2002 became the first environmentalist to deliver the Australia Day address to the nation. His voice is familiar world-wide through radio and is also well-known to Documentary Channel viewers as writer/presenter on numerous ground-breaking series of the past 10 years. Tim was recently honoured as Australian Humanist of the Year as well as Australian of the Year.

 
DR. JAMES E. HANSEN
   
Professor in Columbia University Earth Institute and also Heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in NYC. In addition, Dr Hansen's research has contributed to incredible identification of the properties of clouds of Venus as sulfuric acid. He has worked on understanding the human impact on global climate for nearly 40 years and is universally famous for bringing world-wide awareness of the global warming issue in 1980's.

 
SIR CRISPIN TICKELL
 
Sir Crispin Tickell is the Director of the Policy Foresight Programme at the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization at Oxford University. He is associated with other British universities as well as universities in the United States. His main interests are in the field of the environment and international affairs.
His interests as well as his unparalleled achievements in business, charities, climate and the Earth say all there is to say about this man and his imperative role in our ecological Earth group challenge.
 

 
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Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

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Kristina
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« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2007, 11:01:31 am »

Bianca mentioned Paul Wellstone.  I have a theory on that, I believe he was murdered, too.
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« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2007, 11:03:17 am »

This article states that Gore isn't planning to run, as well as his rationales for not doing so:

Nobel Prize likely to increase pressure on Gore to run

Story Highlights
NEW: Former President Carter says he wants Al Gore to run for presidency

Analysts predict Gore will resist pressure to enter 2008 race

Poll shows 13 percent of Democrats want Gore for their party's nominee

Draftgore.com ran ad this week in The New York Times urging him to run


     
(CNN) -- Political analysts expect that Al Gore's Nobel Peace Prize win will increase the pressure on him to run for president.




Ole Danbolt Mjos, chairman of the Nobel committee, displays a picture of Al Gore in Oslo, Norway, on Friday.

 But those who know him well predict he'll resist the pressure and stay out of the race.

The former vice president and the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change won the honor early Friday for their work in drawing attention to global climate change.

One source, who has been involved in Gore's political campaigns, told CNN that he won't get into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination because he doesn't want to battle Sen. Hillary Clinton. Gore would have given serious consideration to a run if Clinton's campaign had run into problems, the source said, but he has concluded her momentum is unstoppable.

"If she faltered, I think Democrats would probably turn to Al Gore because their argument is, 'Of course he's electable -- he's been elected,' " said CNN senior political analyst Bill Schneider. But Schneider said he thought Gore's response would be that he had no interest in running.

A Gore adviser made a similar prediction to Slate.com's John Dickerson. "The view this morning is this will be energy he can just channel back into this cause he cares so much about," said Dickerson, a CNN political analyst.

Time magazine's Eric Pooley, who has reported extensively on Gore and his environmental efforts, makes the same prediction, but for a different reason.

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"Running for president would mean returning to a role he'd already transcended," Pooley wrote on Time's Web site. "He'd turn into -- again -- just another politician, when a lot of people thought he might be something better than that."

Former President Carter, a Nobel Peace Prize winner in 2002, said on NBC's "Today" show Friday that he considered Gore the most qualified person to be president and that he hoped the Nobel Prize "might lead him to consider another political event."

"I've called Al Gore and urged him to run for president so many times," Carter said on "Today." "He finally told me the last time, 'President Carter, please do not call me any more.' "

Carter added, "I can at least do it indirectly through the news media."

Some of the candidates who would be Gore's rivals if he joined the race offered congratulations and praise.

"The Nobel Peace Prize rewards three decades of Vice President Gore's prescient and compelling -- and often lonely -- advocacy for the future of the Earth," said a statement from former Sen. John Edwards.

Sen. Barack Obama said in a statement, "By having the courage to challenge the skeptics in Washington and lead on the climate crisis facing our planet, Al Gore has advanced the cause of peace and richly deserves this reward."

Gore has said repeatedly this year that he doesn't "have any plans to be a candidate again."

But a group called draftgore.com apparently is hoping to change his mind. The organization, which describes itself as a group of grass-roots Democrats, took out a full-page ad in Wednesday's New York Times.  Watch how the group is trying to persuade Gore to run »

Its open letter urges the 2000 Democratic presidential nominee to enter the 2008 race for the White House, saying "your country needs you now, as do your party, and the planet you are fighting so hard to save."

The letter goes on to say that "America and the Earth need a hero right now, someone who will transcend politics as usual and bring real hope to our country and to the world."

The ad also states that 136,000 people have signed Draft Gore's online petition. Eva Ritchey, from the Draft Gore campaign, said the signatures are coming in by the thousands. She also said the group will start a radio campaign in Florida.

Gore spokeswoman Kalee Kreider said the former vice president "truly appreciates the heartfelt sentiment behind the ad; however, he has no intention of running for president."

But some Democrats aren't giving up. In the most recent CNN-Opinion Research Corp. national poll, 13 percent of Democrats surveyed supported Gore for their party's presidential nomination.

In the poll, he was in fourth place in the Democratic race, two percentage points behind former Edwards and seven points behind Obama, and ahead of five declared candidates.

Clinton leads the poll with 39 percent.

Even if Gore changed his mind and decided to join the fray, the clock is ticking on any run for the White House. "Gore would certainly shake up the race if he changed his mind and decided to get in, but less than three months before the Iowa caucuses, his window of opportunity to actually make a serious run for the Democratic nomination probably has passed him by," said CNN political editor Mark Preston.

Gore was vice president under President Clinton. In 2000, he won the Democratic presidential nomination and faced Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the general election campaign.

Gore won the popular vote but lost the electoral vote after the U.S. Supreme Court denied his challenge of voting results in the key state of Florida.


"An Inconvenient Truth," a 2006 documentary featuring the former vice president, captured two Academy Awards in February. The film focuses on Gore and his worldwide travels to educate the public about the severity of global warming.

Last month Gore picked up an Emmy -- the highest award in television -- for "Current TV," which he co-created. The show describes itself as a global television network that gives viewers the opportunity to create and influence its programming. E-mail to a friend

CNN's Paul Steinhauser contributed to this report.

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/10/12/gore.politics/index.html
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« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2007, 02:06:03 pm »









                                             Prize Caps Year of Highs for Gore
             



 
By JIM RUTENBERG
Published: October 12, 2007
NewYork Times

For Al Gore, winning the Nobel Peace Prize today is the latest twist in a remarkable decade of soaring highs and painful lows. In the span of the last decade he went from being the vice president to being the presumptive Democratic nominee for president to winning the popular vote for president only to lose in the Electoral College — after an intervention by the Supreme Court made his 537-vote loss in Florida official.

 Mr. Gore’s decision to give up the fight after the Supreme Court decision left some of his more die-hard supporters bitter, and he by and large retreated from public view for several years. He rarely inserted himself in the public debate, though he did venture out to speak against the invasion of Iraq before it happened. But, associates have said, it was during that quasi-exile that Mr. Gore broke free of the political consultancy that had come to surround him to find his true voice, returning to the environmental issues to which he had devoted his early political career.

Even before Mr. Gore won an Emmy for his so-called “user generated” cable television network, Current, or an Oscar for his film on climate change, “An Inconvenient Truth,” he was growing in stature for another reason: his early opposition to the Iraq war.

He had initially voiced it in 2002 in an address that his newly galvanized supporters now describe as uncannily prescient and unfairly dismissed, though it was seen as a politically off-kilter at a time of great popularity for President George W. Bush.

The Prize certainly comes as vindication to Mr. Gore, whose early dedication to environmental issues had earned him the derisive nickname “Ozone Man” — “Ozone,” for short — from President George H.W. Bush during the 1992 presidential campaign.

And, the administration of the current President Bush had appeared to work quickly to undo many of Mr. Gore’s initiatives upon taking over the White House, generally casting doubt on some of the theories on climate change — and man’s role in it — that Mr. Gore had espoused, though in recent months and years White House aides have argued that their arguments on global warming have been overblown. (Reuters this morning quoted Tony Fratto, a White House spokesman, as saying, “Of course we’re happy for Vice President Gore and the IPCC for receiving this recognition.)

Mr. Gore’s victory was certain to reverberate quickly in the hair-trigger presidential campaign trail, with Democrats poised to use it against the Republicans, though it was just as likely to prompt debate on cable news and conservative talk radio about the value of such prizes, and the perceived, anti-Bush bias of institutions like the Nobel Foundation.

The Web site of Senator Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign put on its home page a flattering picture of Mr. Gore and a big banner headline “Congratulations!”

Former Senator John Edwards released a statement shortly after 5 a.m., Eastern time, congratulating Mr. Gore and saying, “His leadership stands in stunning contrast to the failure of the current administration to pursue policies that would reduce the harm of global warming.”

Senator Barack Obama said in a statement, “By having the courage to challenge the skeptics in Washington and lead on the climate crisis facing our planet, Al Gore has advanced the cause of peace and richly deserves this reward.”

But if many of Mr. Gore’s supporters get what they want, the crop of Democratic candidates will have Mr. Gore as a new primary campaign opponent soon.

As predicted, the awarding of the Nobel Prize immediately intensified calls for him to enter the Democratic nominating contest for president and speculation over whether he would. The rumors that he would win it had already helped a grassroots movement to draft him into the race raise tens of thousands of dollars for advertisements.

The Washington Examiner this morning quoted the Democratic strategist and former Bill Clinton election mastermind James Carville as saying at the Palm Restaurant in Washington on Thursday night, “I still think there’s a 25 percent chance that Gore gets in,” and “I don’t think it’s too late.”

Mr. Gore’s aides, and, on one or two occasions, Mr. Gore himself, have said he is not interested in running for president when his main goal has been raising public awareness of global climate change and man’s role in it. But they have been coy, refusing to absolutely say “no,” and, in the process, giving the various groups now dedicated to drafting him into the race reason to continue their efforts.

Associates of Mr. Gore, however, have said they truly believe he does not want to run but speculate that he does not have reason to tamp down the presidential talk when it serves to keep the focus on him and causes he is pursuing with a perceptibly pure heart — a perception that could change with a presidential run.

“You never say never in politics but I think he’s having such a big impact on the issues that he cares about that if he decided to run for president he would just be viewed in a fundamentally different way,” said Chris Lehane, a former aide and spokesman for Mr. Gore’s 2000 campaign. “Once you become a candidate for president then you have a completely different lens.”

Yet Mr. Gore’s newly charged supporters hope that the Nobel Prize will now cause him to make another attempt to win the prize they believe is rightly his — the White House.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2007, 03:22:59 pm by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2007, 02:11:32 pm »









Welcome to the official site of the Nobel Peace Prize awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee. This site contains information exclusively concerning the Norwegian Committee, the Norwegian Nobel Institute and the Nobel Peace Prize.



 

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 is to be shared, in two equal parts, between the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Albert Arnold (Al) Gore Jr. for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change.




To celebrate the Nobel Peace Prize Laureate of 2007 the Norwegian Nobel Institute will have open house on 13 October. The Nobel Peace Center will also have free admission on 13 October





On June 11, 2005 The Nobel Peace Center opened its doors.

Further information regarding the Nobel Peace Prize, and the other Nobel Prizes, please see the Nobelprize.org


 

Why a Norwegian Nobel Committee?

The Norwegian Nobel Institute has a large library open to the public.



News from the Norwegian Nobel Institute
« Last Edit: October 12, 2007, 02:13:58 pm by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2007, 02:24:31 pm »

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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2007, 09:56:28 pm »









                                                O N   G O R E





By Josh Marshall



First, before any other yapping and commentary, a big congratulations to Al Gore.


There are several layers of irony and poetic justice wrapped into this honor. The first is that the greatest step for world peace would simply have been for Gore not to have had the presidency stolen from him in November 2000. By every just measure, Gore won the presidency in 2000 only to have George W. Bush steal it from him with the critical assistance of the US Supreme Court. It's worth taking a few moments today to consider where the country and world would be without that original sin of this corrupt presidency.

And yet this is a fitting bookend, with Gore receiving this accolade while the sitting president grows daily an object of greater disapproval, disapprobation and collective shame. And let's not discount another benefit: watching the rump of the American right detail the liberal bias of the Nobel Committee and at this point I guess the entire world. Fox News vs. the world.

And not to forget what this award is about even more than Gore. If half of what we think we know about global warming is true, people will look back fifty years from now on the claims that "War on Terror" was the defining challenge of this century and see it as a very sick, sad joke -- which rather sums up the Bush presidency.

But more than thinking only of what might have been, where can we go from here?


http://talkingpointsmemo.com/archives/055785.php
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« Reply #14 on: October 12, 2007, 11:03:49 pm »

RE: "while the sitting president grows daily an object of greater disapproval, disapprobation and collective shame."

This is EXACTLY why Bush had to serve a second term!  I have been telling this to my despairing friends ever since he was re-elected...  It was vitally important to America for the myriad monstrous vultures come home to roost on his and his co-conspirators own roofs. 

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Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

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