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Field Museum of Natural History

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Europa
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« on: July 25, 2007, 10:26:49 pm »



Field Museum of Natural History.
Location: East Roosevelt Road at South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL
Coordinates: 4151′58.6″N, 8737′1.34″W
Built/Founded: 1906
Architect: Daniel H. Burnham & Co.; Burnham Graham & Co.
Architectural style(s): Classical Revival
Added to NRHP: September 05, 1975
NRHP Reference #: 75000647 [1]
Governing body: Private
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Europa
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« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2007, 10:29:56 pm »

The Field Museum of Natural History (commonly abbreviated to FMNH or The Field Museum) is located in Chicago, Illinois, USA. It sits on Lake Shore Drive next to Lake Michigan, part of a scenic complex known as Museum Campus Chicago.
The architecture of this building typifies the style initiated by the World's Columbian Exposition, of the 1890s and major portions of the early collections were acquired after their display at the Exposition. It was originally named the "Columbian Museum of Chicago" on September 16, 1893 but renamed after Marshall Field, a major donor who provided a significant amount of the funding needed to found the museum, in 1905. The museum was originally housed in the Palace of Fine Arts from the Exposition, the structure now occupied by the Museum of Science and Industry. The current location is a building that opened in 1921. The museum was added to the National Register of Historic Places on September 5, 1975. The museum was the site of the 1997 movie "The Relic" and the 1978 film Damien: Omen II.
For some years, during the 1950s and 1960s, it was officially known as the "Chicago Natural History Museum" but eventually the still-popular name "Field Museum" was restored.
The museum is organized into four major departments: Anthropology, Zoology, Botany and Geology.

Some prized exhibits at The Field Museum include:
   Sue, the largest and most complete Tyrannosaurus rex fossil skeleton currently known.
   A comprehensive set of human cultural anthropology exhibits, including artifacts from ancient Egypt, the Pacific Northwest and Tibet.
   A large and diverse taxidermy collection, featuring many large animals, including two prized African elephants and the infamous Lions of Tsavo, featured in the 1996 movie "The Ghost and the Darkness".
   A large collection of dinosaurs in the Evolving Planet exhibit (formerly Life Over Time).
   A large collection of Native American artifacts. The main exhibit with these artifacts will reopen as Ancient Americas in March.
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« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2007, 10:32:43 pm »



Field Museum - Aerial View
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2007, 10:33:37 pm »



Northern facade of The Field Museum
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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2007, 10:34:57 pm »

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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2009, 06:56:10 pm »










                                              Iraqi archaeologists dig Chicago museum





Wed May 13, 2009
CHICAGO
(AFP)

- Isolated from their international colleagues first by Saddam Hussein's regime and then by war, Iraqi researchers are anxious to be introduced to modern techniques and trained on equipment they can use to better investigate Iraq's rich cultural heritage.
 
Hands covered in blue gloves, Iraqi archaeologists carefully place samples in a glass tube to determine if they pose a threat to artifacts.


It's a simple test used by museums around the world to make sure materials used to display or store artifacts are not corrosive, but one these researchers are learning for the first time during a six month fellowship at Chicago's Field Museum.


"So many objects need conservation," said Alaa Hussein Jasim, an archaeologist with the Iraq Ministry of State for Tourism and Antiquities.


"They need to be repaired and put in good condition. When we know the internal structure of an object, know the metals, we then know which methods of restoration we should follow."


The US State Department is also providing funding to restore the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad, which was ransacked by looters following the 2003 invasion, and to build a historic preservation training institute in Erbil.


"Before (the) war we had many techniques for conservation and analysis," said Shukran Al-Alwe, a conservator with the Iraq National Museum.


"After (the) war we don't have any more of this because our laboratory was destroyed completely."


Alwe and her colleagues have been forced to rely upon simple conservation methods like manually grinding off rust and applying a protective varnish because the museum did not have the funding to buy new equipment.


The new tools and techniques will allow them to better restore, analyze and protect the thousands of objects in the museum's growing collection.


Archaeologists continue to dig despite the instability in Iraq, which is home to the earliest human civilization - Sumerian - and has hundreds if not thousands of unexplored sites.


But the museum was sorely lacking in the funds and facilities to store and manage its collection.


"We have to preserve these objects to keep them in good condition because these objects represent our civilization and our heritage," Alwe told AFP.


The Field Museum will host 18 Iraqi researchers over the next two years in partnership with the University of Chicago.


They will be trained in conservation, collection management and how to find, map and better excavate new sites with tools like ground penetrating radar and satellite imagery.


"Anarchy and looting of archaeological sites has destroyed 25 percent of the sites in southern Iraq," said Field curator James Phillips, who is in charge of the Iraq Cultural Heritage Project.


"We're moving in the right direction now. The Iraqi government acknowledges that archeology is important and they should preserve it."


The program will also help the Field museum better understand its collection of 23,000 artifacts from the 5,000 year-old city of Kish, Iraq which were excavated between 1923 and 1933.

"For us, it's a very interesting exchange," said Hildegard Heine, a German conservator who manages the museum's Kish project and is helping to train the Iraqis.

"They can teach us something about these objects that we didn't know."
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