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GOLDSMITH'S ART - Faberge' Eggs

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Author Topic: GOLDSMITH'S ART - Faberge' Eggs  (Read 7839 times)
Bianca
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« on: May 23, 2008, 11:37:00 am »




             

The Renaissance Faberge' egg is displayed during the
exhibition 'Treasures of Imperial Russia' in Croatia's
Adriatic town of Dubrovnik on November 3, 2007.

(Nikola Solic/Reuters)









                                        Revived Faberge' To Create First Egg Since 1917






By Eric Onstad
May 23, 2008
 


LONDON (Reuters) - A revived Faberge luxury goods group plans to resurrect its founder's work next year with the launch of the first jewel-encrusted egg since 1917, when the Faberge family was scattered by the Russian revolution.
 
 
A group of investors bought rights to Faberge' last year -- which had been used to market cosmetics like Brut men's fragrance -- and have been working to restore the firm to its origins with the support of the Russian founder's relatives.

"Faberge' will announce their first new collection, the first authentic, family-blessed collection since 1917, in the course of next year," Sean Gilbertson, a partner in the Pallinghurst fund that owns Faberge', told Reuters.

The original Faberge' company was founded in 1842 by Russian jeweler Gustav Faberge', who gained fame for designing elaborate jewel-encrusted eggs for Russian Tsars.

The last Faberge' egg completed before the Russian revolution was military egg made of steel since gems and precious metals were not available, Gilbertson said.

Tatiana and Sarah Faberge', among the descendants of Gustav Faberge', agreed to sit on a council to restore the exclusive nature of the company.

The new Faberge' will at least initially stick to the founders' products -- objects of art, fine jewellery and items such as ashtrays and pillboxes.

"It's very much sticking to what Faberge' was originally all about. For the foreseeable future there's no clothing or anything along those lines," Gilbertson said.

The original Faberge' family was scattered by the Bolshevik revolution in 1917, but Gustav's grandsons who established a new Faberge' firm in Paris discovered after World War Two that a U.S. businessman was selling perfume under their family name.

They launched a lawsuit, but ran out of money and ceded rights to their family name to a U.S. firm in 1951 for $25,000. The Faberge' brand then went through many owners before being sold for $1.55 billion to consumer goods group Unilever in 1989. Pallinghurst bought the rights last year from Unilever for an undisclosed sum.

Faberge' has appointed as chief executive Mark Dunhill, former president of Alfred Dunhill, the leather and accessories brand of Swiss luxury goods maker Richemont.

Its creative director is Katharina Flohr, former jewellery editor of Tatler magazine, Gilbertson said.

(Reporting by Eric Onstad; Editing by Elizabeth Piper)
« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 04:31:21 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2008, 07:07:44 am »

                                     



                           






                                               IMPERIAL EASTER EGGS (FABERGE EGGS)






Faberge's first Imperial Easter egg was commissioned by Tsar Alexander III in 1885.

Due to its instant success, a permanent order was given to Faberge, who crafted one egg after another
for the Imperial Family.

Ten were for Tsar Alexander III, who gave them to his wife Maria Feodorovna until his death in 1894.

An additional forty-four were created for Tsar Nicholas II from 1895 until 1916 as presents for his mother, the Dowager Empress, and for his wife Alexandra Feodorovna, thus bringing this to a total of fifty-four eggs.

 It is also conceivable that some eggs were given to other members of the Imperial Family.

Forty-four Imperial Easter Faberge eggs are known to exist, while a further five are known from descriptions.

One of the two half-finished Imperial eggs for 1917 has also survived.

These eggs are now scattered over the world since their sale by Soviet commissars in the 1920s and 1930s.

 Ten have remained in the Kremlin Armoury, eleven were in the FORBES Magazine Collection.

But recently the Russian Oil and Gas industrialist Victor Vekselberg bought nine eggs from this collection valued at about $90 million. He intends to display them in Russian museums.

Thirteen are still in American museums, and the remaining ten are housed in private collections.

Problems concerning the chronology of these Faberge eggs is addressed in another chapter (see Lopato,
'A Few Remarks Concerning Imperial Easter Faberge Eggs'. Suffice it so say that earlier speculative datings of eggs have been somewhat thrown into disarray due to findings in the Imperial archives.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2009, 04:54:18 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2008, 07:20:43 am »




             

               PETER CARL FABERGE`









 
Peter Carl Fabergé, known as Carl Gustavovich Fabergé (Russian: Карл Густавович Фаберже, May 30 1846 – September 24 1920) was a Russian jeweler, best known for the famous 'Fabergé Eggs', made in the style of genuine Easter eggs, but using precious metals and gemstones rather than more mundane materials.

He was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia, to the jeweller Gustav Faberge and his Danish wife Charlotte Jungstedt. Gustav Fabergé’s father’s family were Huguenots, originally from La Bouteille, Picardie, who fled from France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, initially to Germany near Berlin, then in 1800 to the Baltic province of Livonia, then part of Russia.

Carl and his younger brother Agaton were a sensation at the Pan-Russian Exhibition held in Moscow in 1882.

Three years later, Czar Alexander III appointed him an official Court Supplier, as a reward for making him a splendid Easter egg to give to his wife. Thereafter, Fabergé made an egg each year for the Czar to give to
the Empress Maria. The next Czar, Nicholas II, ordered two eggs each year, one for his mother and one for
his own wife, Alexandra, a practice which continued from 1885 to 1917.

He became the Czar’s Court Goldsmith in 1885.

The Imperial Easter eggs were a sideline; Fabergé made many more objects ranging from silver tableware to
fine jewelry. Fabergé’s company became the largest in Russia, with 500 employees and branches in Saint Petersburg, Moscow, Odessa, Kiev and London. It produced some 150,000 objects between 1882 and 1917.

In 1897 the Swedish court appointed Fabergé Court Goldsmith.

In 1900 his work represented Russia at the 1900 World’s Fair in Paris.



RETRIEVED FROM:

wikipedia.org





                                                                  *        *        *







The series of Imperial Easter Faberge eggs is the most ambitious project ever entrusted to a
goldsmith.

The only conditions set appear to have been an oviform shape, a surprise of some form, and no repetitions.

Surprises were frequently linked to some occurrence in the history of the Imperial Family — births, anniversaries, inaugurations.

Some bear royal monograms and/ or dates, and many exhibit miniatures of the Imperial children, or
their abodes.

Two contain models of Imperial vessels.

Faberge took this commission extremely seriously, often planning eggs years ahead of time. Some did indeed require several years to finish.

Much secrecy surrounded the surprise in the Faberge eggs, which was never divulged in advance, not even to the Tsar himself.

The solemn presentation of the egg was made by Faberge or by his son Eugene, and the recipient was invariably delighted.
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« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2008, 07:24:08 am »





             

              IMPERIAL CORONATION EGG









The first two Faberge eggs, each with a hen motif, appear to have been designed and produced under close supervision.

In the following years a certain dependence on earlier models can be detected.By the mid-1890s, however, the designs of the eggs become increasingly audacious.

Among the most felicitous examples are the 1897 Coronation Coach egg, the 1898 Lilies-of-the-Valley egg, the 1899 Pansy egg, the 1901 Gatchina Palace egg, the 1913 Romanov Tercentenary egg, and the 1914 Mosaic egg. The series ends on a subdued note with two plain Red Cross eggs for 1915 the simple Order of St. George egg, and the stark Military egg for 1916. Some of Faberge's clients dared to emulate the Imperial Family in their Easter customs, ordering their own Faberge eggs. A documented series was commissioned by Aleksandr Ferdinandovich Kelch, the Siberian gold magnate, for his wife Barbara, nee Bazanova, between 1898 and 1904. Single Faberge eggs were also made for the Yusupovs and the Nobels.


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« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2008, 07:31:57 am »











RUSSIAN EASTER EGGS



Easter eggs are well-known Russian memorabilia, whose fame outside of this country is probably second only to painted wooden matryoshka dolls. Lately, however, the interest toward the Easter egg has been of a special nature. It is explained by its somewhat illegal status during 70 years. Antique Easter eggs were stored away in different museums, almost inaccessible to the public. It goes without saying that in Soviet times the good tradition of giving and receiving artistically painted Easter eggs on the bright holiday of Christ's Resurrection almost disappeared. In the late 1980s forgotten customs and rituals returned, including the old Russian tradition of a triple kiss and the giving of an Easter egg.

Recently, the famous Winter Easter Faberge Egg, which Emperor Nicholas II gave to his mother, Empress Maria Fedorovna, for the 300th anniversary of the House of Romanov, has been sold for a sensational sum of $7.5 million at a Christie's auction in Geneva.

Easter eggs are an attribute of one of the most important Christian holidays: the day of prayer for
the «miraculous Resurrection» of crucified Jesus Christ.

According to a tradition, the first Easter egg Saint Mary Magdalene coequal with the apostles gave to Roman Emperor Tiberius.

Shortly after Christ the Savior's Ascension, Mary Magdalene came to Rome to preach the gospel. In those times, people coming to see the emperor were supposed to bring him a present. Wealthy people used to bring jewelry, and poor people, what they could afford. Therefore, Mary Magdalene, once a noble and rich woman, who then lost everything, except her faith in Jesus, offered to Emperor Tiberius a chicken egg and exclaimed: «Christ has resurrected» The emperor, doubting her words, noted that nobody could rise from the dead and that it was as hard to believe in what she had said as in that a white egg might turn red. Tiberius was still saying those words when the egg began changing its color and turned scarlet.
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« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2008, 07:32:52 am »




             
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« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2008, 07:34:34 am »




             









Thus, from the very first century of Christianity, colored eggs have always been the symbol of Jesus' Resurrection and, with it, a purification in the name of a new, better life to the believers in God the Son. The eggs' red color has symbolized Christ's blood and at the same time was the symbol of the Resurrection. By giving each other Easter eggs, Christians profess the faith in their Resurrection. Once it was customary to give away an egg as a simple, little offering to pagan gods, to give eggs to friends and benefactors—on the first day of the New Year and on birthday. Rich people, instead of painted chicken eggs, often offered golden or gilded eggs, symbolizing the Sun.

The celebration of Easter in Russia was introduced in the late 10th century. Orthodox Easter is observed on the first Sunday following the spring equinox and March full moon. Easter in Russia was accompanied by ceremonies that came from pagan times but now consecrated by the Light of Christ.

Easter coincides with the time when spring comes. By this day, as a sign of blossom, boiled eggs used to be painted in different colors from time immemorial. Easter in Russia has always had a universal, comprehensive nature. The Great Day was a church celebration, a ritual, human happiness, etc. Every nation has its own holidays, but among them there is a principal one. In Russia, such has for centuries been Holy Easter.

The tradition of giving and receiving painted eggs on Easter has existed in Russia from time immemorial. Once, in the reign of Czar Alexis (1645-1676), some 37,000 eggs were prepared by Easter to be given out. Along with natural (chicken, swan, goose, pigeon, and duck) painted eggs, there were carved and painted wooden and bone ones.
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« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2008, 07:35:35 am »





             









The first documented golden painted egg appeared in 1664. Procopius Ivanov, herbal ornamental design artist of the Trinity-Sergius Monastery, was summoned to Moscow to paint eggs. Two years later he brought to the court 170 wooden eggs painted over gold «in various colored paints in beautiful herbal patterns.»

In the 18th-19th centuries, artistically decorated Easter eggs become so widespread among the various segments of the Russian population that from that time it is possible to speak about Easter eggs as a peculiar type of popular decorative applied art. By that time, both precious jewelry eggs and simple peasant pisanki (painted eggs) and krashenki (dyed eggs) had become fairly traditional.

As a result of Peter the Great's reforms (from the founding of the city St Petersburg 1703), materials new for Russia appeared — porcelain, glass, papier-mache — and contributed to the development of the art of making Russian Easter Eggs.

The earliest porcelain Easter egg that came down to us was created for the 1749 Easter. From then until the 1917 revolution, the Imperial Porcelain Factory manufactured Easter eggs. For every Easter Sunday, the factory manufactured Easter eggs for the members of the imperial family «to be handed out» at the time of congratulating each other on Easter day. The decoration of Easter eggs, especially porcelain and glass ones, which were the most numerous throughout the 19th century, correlated with a particular trend in the fine arts.
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« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2008, 07:36:53 am »




             










Starting from the second half of the 19th century, the design of Easter eggs becomes more peculiar, with the use of traditional religious Easter subject matters. Czars themselves sometimes acted as inspectors: thus, Alexander III recommended that eggs be painted not only in colors but also in ornaments, and he liked glass samples of one piece with engraved designs.

Well known are late-19th-century Easter eggs made of papier-mache manufactured at N. Lukutin's factory near Moscow, now famous as Fedoskino Factory of lacquer miniature painting. In the late 19th—early 20th century Easter eggs were also painted in Moscow's icon studios created by artists originally from Russia's traditional icon-painting centers: Palekh, Mstyora, and Kholuy.

One of the first persons who tried to combine an Easter egg with a jewel was Carl Faberge. His name is most frequently associated precisely with the brilliant art of the decorative Easter egg – The Faberge Egg. For known reasons the decorative Faberge eggs have until recently been more widely known outside of Russia.
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« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2008, 07:38:25 am »












The Faberge studios created 54 Easter Faberge eggs for Russian Emperor Alexander III and Emperor Nicholas II. Between 1885 and 1894 Alexander III presented his wife with ten Easter eggs, and Nicholas II, from his father's death in 1894 to 1917, presented the Dowager Cziarina, Maria Fedorovna, and his wife with 44 Easter eggs.

The first Faberge Easter egg was made in 1885 by Mikhail Perikhin. In 1886, at the age of 26, this skilled craftsman from the Siberian town of Petrovskiy Zavod became chief foreman of the Faberge firm. Until 1903, when he died, his initials were put on all surprise eggs of the firm made for Emperors Alexander III and Nicholas II. The first egg made by Perikhin consisted of an ivory «shell» with stripes of dark blue enamel; in the «shell» there was a golden-. with-enamel hen with ruby eyes. Inside the hen, there was a golden crown inlaid with pearl. And inside the crown there was a golden ring.
It was precisely in 1885 that the tradition of giving annually Faberge Easter eggs was born. «Your Majesty will be pleased», this answer Faberge used to give when asked about the subject matter of a new egg.







The tradition of making jewelry Easter eggs in Russia was old. For instance, skilled craftsman Nordberg made a silvered surprise egg for Alexander II. But it was the Faberge firm which brought the art of making jewelry Easter eggs to an unsurpassed level of skillfulness, elegance, and creative inventiveness. Faberge never produced exact copies. All Faberge works bear the stamp of a single, inimitable, individual style, which has entered the history of world art forever. The Russian imperial dynasty and its numerous royal and princely relatives in Britain, Denmark, Greece, Bulgaria, Hesse, and Hannover received Faberge eggs as presents from Russia, highly prized those-presents, and passed them down to their heirs.
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« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2008, 07:39:47 am »




             









After the First World War, the fall of monarchy in Russia, and the impoverishment of the aristocracy, many Faberge articles were sold or passed to new owners. In the 1920's, to add hard currency to the treasury, the Soviet government sold a number of works of art from state collections. From the imperial collections, confiscated after 1917, a large portion of apparently «absolutely useless» for Soviet society unique Easter eggs was sold.

Even in spite of the belligerent atheism of the postrevolution decades, the tradition of celebrating Easter was passing from generation to generation—it was very deep-rooted in the Orthodox believers throughout Russia. When the making of present, artistic Easter eggs stopped, people continued celebrating Easter with krashenki (those eggs dyed in one or several colors which practically every Russian knows) and pisanki (painted with ornaments).

Almost all manufacturers of traditional painted wooden art works would make Easter eggs as well. True, for a long time this was disapproved of by the officials. Therefore the living art of the wooden Easter egg found refuge in backcountry villages east of the Volga: Polkhovskiy Maydan and Krutets. The most frequently represented motifs and subject matters are images of a cockerel or a pullet, a sun, a temple or a church, etc.

Today there excist well know centers for producing Eastern Eggs such as Nizhni Novgorod area, where one of the first places is held by legendary Khokhloma.
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« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2008, 07:41:28 am »





             









 While in popular artistic centers of woodworking the art of making lathe ornamented eggs survived even in the Soviet period, in the traditional centers of lacquer miniature painting on papier-mache it appeared only in post-Soviet times, after a long interval of oblivion. As before the 1917 revolution, Easter eggs with lacquer miniature painting of the traditional centers of Fedoskino, Dalekh, Mstyora, and Kholuy are made to order and are fairly expensive. The art of Kholmogory handicraftsmen is known from time immemorial to make bone articles, also Eastern Eggs.


Probably the most ancient of all existing Easter eggs from various materials are the eggs from semiprecious and precious stones and minerals. Ceramic enterprises manufacturing porcelain, delft, and majolica articles prefer mass production of eggs. These artistic enterprises approach the decoration of Easter eggs in a fairly traditional way.

Modern Easter eggs by individual authors are an original phenomenon in the Russian artistic culture of the late 20th century. They are fruits of living, free artistic creative work.
Modern Easter eggs by individual authors can be divided into several motif groups: religious, architectural landscape, simple landscape, literature (Russian epic poems, Russian popular fairy tales, works by Russian writes), pagan motifs, symbolic, etc. fiuch a diversity means that the art of the modern Russian Easter egg is developing in various directions. It is noteworthy that some professional artists who a short time ago began painting matryoshka dolls, switched tree or four years later to Easter eggs, and then took up icon painting.

 Russian poet Marina Tsvetayeva once said that all gifts are given to the ignorant and the ungrateful, except the gift, of the soul, which is nothing but conscience and memory. The best examples of Easter eggs with religious images are charged with such energy and impact so strongly that they really can rouse historic memory and illuminate our souls.

The art of Easter eggs is a whole new world, a feature in the living image of Russia.


http://7gifts.com/shop/faberge_eggs/history.html
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« Reply #12 on: May 24, 2008, 07:44:55 am »



Faberge egg in the Armoury Museum in the Kremlin.

MOSCOW, RUSSIA
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« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2008, 07:48:33 am »



Kremlin Armoury

MOSCOW, RUSSIA
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« Reply #14 on: May 24, 2008, 07:51:25 am »









Easter’s most valuable eggs were hand crafted in the 1880s.

Made by the great goldsmith Peter Carl Faberge, they were commissioned by Czar Alexander III of
Russia as gifts for his wife, Czarina Maria Feodorovna.

The first Faberge egg, presented in 1886, measured two and a half inches long and had a decept-
ively simple exterior.

Inside the white enamel shell, though, was a golden yolk which, when opened, revealed a gold hen
with ruby eyes. The hen itself could be opened, by lifting the beak, to expose a tiny diamond replica
of the imperial crown.



http://www.inspirationline.com/Brainteaser/egg.htm
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