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THE PRESUMPTIVE NOMINEE

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Bethany Beightol
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« on: May 07, 2008, 01:13:05 am »

THE PRESUMPTIVE NOMINEE




Obama Dominates In North Carolina... Clinton Wins Indiana By Less Than 2 Points ... Russert: Obama Is The Nominee... Obama Shifting To General Election Strategy... Hillary Cancels Morning Show Appearances... Clinton Camp Message: "Take A Deep Breath"... Watch Video... Full Exit Polls... Clinton Advisers Expect Calls To Resign From Supporters...
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Bethany Beightol
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2008, 01:15:27 am »

Clinton Declares Indiana Victory



Hillary Rodham Clinton pledged to keep going full throttle for the Democratic presidential nomination Tuesday after losing North Carolina and facing a strong challenge from Barack Obama in Indiana.

With thousands of votes yet to be counted in Indiana, Clinton claimed victory there and pronounced it the tiebreaker in her favor.

"Tonight, we've come from behind. We've broken the tie, and thanks to you, it's full speed on to the White House," Clinton told hundreds of supporters in downtown Indianapolis. Former President Clinton and daughter Chelsea were by her side.

Underscoring the difficulty of her effort to block Obama from claiming the Democratic nomination, Clinton also made a direct fundraising appeal to backers to help her compete against his better-financed operation.

"I need your help to continue our journey," Clinton said. "This has always been your campaign, and this is your victory because your support has meant the difference between winning and losing."

"I hope you will go to HillaryClinton.com and support our campaign," she added.

Clinton spoke before it was certain that she had won Indiana. Clinton led narrowly in the state, and Obama said it appeared Clinton had won there. But thousands of votes had yet to be counted, principally in Lake County, a heavily black area not far from Obama's home city of Chicago.

Clinton noted the back-and-forth nature of the protracted fight: "I win, he wins. I win, he wins. It's so close."

Then, in what was perhaps a nod to her uphill struggle to overcome Obama's delegate lead, she pledged anew that she'll swing behind the Democratic nominee "no matter what happens."

She pledged to press on for the nomination, saying: "These next primaries are another test. I will work my heart out in West Virginia and Kentucky. I intend to win them in November."

Clinton hoped an Indiana victory would give her fresh talking points as she works to convince voters yet to cast their ballots and undecided superdelegates -- elected Democratic officials -- to side with her in the punishingly long nomination fight.

The New York senator was heading back to Washington late Tuesday. Her only public appearance Wednesday was an evening fundraiser. She planned to return to the campaign trail Thursday with events in at least one of the remaining states to vote.

Once the Democratic front-runner, Clinton sustained a series of losses to Obama early in the year and in the months since has been slowly clawing her way back into the thick of the race.

Over the past two months, she scored a couple of big-state wins as Obama faltered amid the controversy surrounding his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, and Obama's own comment that people from small towns cling to guns and religion because they are bitter.

Seeking to take advantage of that opportunity, Clinton retooled her campaign to focus on producing results for an anxious middle class and started aggressively courting white, working-class voters at a time of economic anxiety. With that strategy, she triumphed last month in Pennsylvania and kept her candidacy alive.

She used the same bread-and-butter message in Indiana and North Carolina, and the final days of those primaries were dominated by Clinton's call for a summertime suspension of the federal gasoline tax.

Despite her progress, the math in the race to rack up the 2,025 delegates needed to clinch the nomination still favors Obama; he leads Clinton in delegates won in primaries and caucuses, and has steadily whittled away at Clinton's advantage in superdelegates over the past two weeks.

It will be difficult -- if not impossible -- for Clinton to overtake him even if she manages to win a chunk of the states left to vote and convinces many of the unaligned superdelegate to break her way.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/05/06/clinton-declares-indiana_n_100508.html
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Bethany Beightol
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2008, 01:18:46 am »


Hillary Clinton Loan Suspected, Campaign "Close To Broke"



Ben Smith of Politico reported Tuesday night that Hillary Clinton might have made another loan to her campaign:

I asked Clinton campaign chairman Terry McAuliffe just now whether Clinton had given or loaned her campaign more money in the run-up to North Carolina and Indiana.
"Might be. Might not be," McAuliffe said, adding that the campaign would release more fundraising details tomorrow.


Clinton Advisers Expect Calls To Withdraw From Supporters: The New York Times article on Tuesday's primary results includes some interesting details about the state of the Clinton campaign following her big loss in North Carolina:

Mrs. Clinton's advisers acknowledged that the results of the primaries were far less than they had hoped, and said they were likely to face new pleas even from some of their own supporters for her to quit the race. They said they expected fund-raising to become even harder now; one adviser said the campaign was essentially broke, and several others refused to say whether Mrs. Clinton had lent the campaign money from her personal account to keep it afloat.


The advisers said they were dispirited over the loss in North Carolina, after her campaign -- working off a shoestring budget as spending outpaces fund-raising -- decided to allocate millions of dollars, some key operatives and full days of the candidate and her husband there.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/05/06/new-hillary-clinton-loan_n_100492.html
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Bethany Beightol
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2008, 01:24:54 am »


North Carolina, Indiana Primaries: Full Results, Exit Polls

INDIANA RESULTS - 99% Reporting

Clinton
638,192
51%

Obama
615,753
49%

NORTH CAROLINA RESULTS - 99% Reporting

Obama
889,513
56%

Clinton
657,616
42%

See complete exit poll breakdown here.

ELECTION RESULTS NEWS:

1:30 AM - Obama Shifts To General Election Mode: "The Obama campaign appears poised to begin running its general election campaign after Tuesday night’s primaries seemed unlikely to change the math or the momentum in the Democratic nomination," the Wall Street Journal reports.

David Axelrod, the top Obama strategist, told reporters that Barack Obama would compete for the six remaining Democratic contests, where 217 delegates are at stake. But he said that the campaign would soon focus on the general election because likely Republican nominee John McCain had “basically run free for some time now because we’ve been consumed with this." He added: “I don’t think we’re going to spend time solely in primary states.”

Pressed by reporters whether that meant the campaign would make stops in general election states over the next month, Axelrod said: “You could infer that from what I said.



1:05 AM - Pledged Delegate Race Is Over: Politico's delegate counter estimates a net +15 for Obama: Clinton +2 in Indiana, Obama +17

What's interesting if these numbers hold is that this assures that Obama will win a majority of the 3,253 pledged delegates [excluding Florida and Michigan]. He's now at 1,494. Under this set of numbers, he picks up 101 for a total of 1,595. A majority is 1,627, so he's 33 short. If you assume he makes threshold in each of the remaining 24 districts for one delegate and then picks up at least one PLEO and one at-large in each of the 6 remaining contests, he's at 1,631. The battle for the majority of pledged delegates is over.
12:30 AM - Russert: Obama Is The Nominee: "We now know who the Democratic nominee is going to be," NBC's Tim Russert just declared on MSNBC.

The Meet the Press host was referring to Barack Obama, who won a decisive victory over Hillary Rodham Clinton in today's North Carolina primary and is within just a few percentage points of her in the Indiana vote count.

The network's Chuck Todd just ran through the math and calculated that Obama now leads Clinton in the "popular vote" by about 710,000 -- and by 200,000 if the disputed primaries in Florida and Michigan are counted. He also leads by about 160 Democratic convention delegates, Todd said.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/05/06/north-carolina-indiana-pr_n_100400.html
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Bethany Beightol
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2008, 01:32:58 am »

 
Terry McAuliffe Has Become Baghdad Bob

Matt Littman

After the United States took the airport in Baghdad, Iraqi Minister of Information Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf, aka "Baghdad Bob," stood in front of the world's media and exclaimed, "We butchered the force present at the airport. We have retaken the airport! There are no Americans there!"

Was Baghdad Bob delusional? Did he truly believe that the American forces were killed at the airport? Or did he know the truth and just recite his hopes?

I ask this because I have watched Terry McAuliffe on television tonight, and it sounds as if the reporters interviewing him, and certainly the people watching the news, no longer take Terry seriously. He has morphed into someone who speaks in untruths, and here's the really bad news for Terry McAuliffe: tonight, his candidate suffered an incredible defeat. She is going to lose the nomination because she failed to capitalize on Pennsylvania and the Rev. Wright issue, and Senator Obama's big victory

But for millions of Americans who watch the news and specifically the cable news networks, Terry McAuliffe will forever be known as someone who is not to be taken seriously. And that's sad. Let's remember, Mr. McAuliffe was the head of the Democratic National Committee. He was a respected figure in the party. But those days are gone, and let's just use an interview he did tonight on Fox News as an example of why Terry McAuliffe's reputation morphed from party leader into Hillary Clinton's Minister of Disinformation.

Terry McAuliffe said that North Carolina would be tough because they were 25 points down and outspent 2-1.

But Obama went from 20 down in Pennsylvania to lose by nine. Hillary was down in one poll by 23 points, but in most polls it was 14 points or less. The most recent polls had her down by around eight points. The reason Senator Clinton is outspent is because people are voting with their wallets. 1.5 million people have contributed to the Obama campaign. Many are people without much money who have not contributed to a candidate until this election. So the fact that Hillary is being outspent is akin to saying she's being outvoted.

Terry: Hillary will clearly be ahead in the popular vote. Michigan and Florida voted - no one has an issue about that. No one argues that they voted.

Let's remember: Michigan moved up its election to a date earlier than the DNC allowed. Democrats took their names off the ballot - except for Senator Clinton. So there was no Obama, no John Edwards. Just Hillary - and she beat Uncommitted 55-40. That's not an overwhelming victory. Further, Governor Jim Blanchard, a big Hillary supporter, said that a revote said, "I think if we had a vote in Michigan, it could easily be close. The amount of delegates wouldn't make much difference." If Michigan was going to count, would John Edwards have won? I don't know, but his message would have been perfect for the state. Further, right now, Obama is ahead in the popular vote. There is no network, no commentator, no independent source who says that Hillary has more popular votes than Obama, because she doesn't. Obama is up by a few hundred thousand votes.

Terry: Hillary wins Ohio and Florida, so she is better to take on McCain.

Uhhh... okay. So because Hillary won Ohio, Obama wouldn't be able to beat McCain? Sure, Terry. Of course, Obama won Virginia and North Carolina. Would he be able to win those states in the general election? Certainly, Virginia is up for grabs. California, New York and Illinois will all go to the Democrat. Wisconsin is likely to go to Obama.
Certainly, new voters and independents are likely to favor Obama against McCain. And 58% of Indiana Repubicans just said that Obama is more likely to defeat McCain. Add to that, Rush Limbaugh is urging Republicans to vote for Hillary in the primaries so the Republicans can run against her and not him. And, the big one: Hillary has not been vetted. Obama has gone through a trial by fire, while his campaign never brings up Whitewater, Impeachment, Filegate, Travelgate, the scandals involving Hillary's brothers, the secrecy around the Clinton Library donors, or the Pardon Scandals. The Republicans are drooling at the prospect of running against those issues - hence, Rush Limbaugh urging Republicans to vote for Hillary.

The sadness here is that Obama is going to be the nominee, and Democrats who were once counted on, like McAuliffe, will not be remember for the good they did. They'll be happy in the private sector but their public service will be a memory only discussed with their former colleagues. Baghdad Bob? He's a memory, too, and his colleagues from the Hussein era probably toast his service. But to the rest of the world, Baghdad Bob is punchline. And Terry McAuliffe will have the rest of his life to know how that feels.

Read more reactions from Huffington Post bloggers to the Indiana and North Carolina primary results

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matt-littman/terry-mcauliffe-has-becom_b_100493.html
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Volitzer
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2008, 02:43:39 am »

Looks like Hillary has run her course.

The Money Masters.




Endgame




America: Freedom to Fascism




The Track Records:

http://knowbeforeyouvote.com


Too bad Obama is lying just as much as Hillary is in their campaigns.  They are both CFR pawns.

Their voting records prove it.

 Wink
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2008, 04:34:38 am »


Hillary Clinton Loan Suspected, Campaign "Close To Broke"



I suspect this is how she would run the country, as well.   Sad
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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2008, 10:45:48 am »

Quote
Too bad Obama is lying just as much as Hillary is in their campaigns.  They are both CFR pawns.

Their voting records prove it.

Not!  This is an honest guy, let's all give the guy a chance to actually change things before turning on him, shall we?  We all know that the other candidates are all Washingon insiders and it would simply be more of the same.
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Volitzer
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« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2008, 01:00:52 pm »

Quote
Too bad Obama is lying just as much as Hillary is in their campaigns.  They are both CFR pawns.

Their voting records prove it.

Not!  This is an honest guy, let's all give the guy a chance to actually change things before turning on him, shall we?  We all know that the other candidates are all Washingon insiders and it would simply be more of the same.

Look at how Obama has voted.  Why won't you stop being so enamored by him and go for a guy who votes on the side of the Americans and not the Globalists.

Show me proof of why I should vote for him.

I have shown proof of why you shouldn't.  http://knowbeforeyouvote.com

He has literally been caught campaigning against NAFTA all the while taking money from corporate interests who stand to benefit from more free-trade deals.  Obama literally tells them, 'Don't worry I'm just pandering to my base.'  Now from what I know about women they usually hate being lied to.

So tell me again why I should vote for Obama other than the fact he knows how to charm the masses.
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2008, 01:10:11 pm »

I agree, Monique.  Nobody knows how any candidate will do on the job.  The Presidency is a unique office.  But let's at least give Obama a chance.  He already has a excellent track record.  His opponents are nothing but Washington insiders, and America is sick and tired of business as usual.
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Volitzer
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« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2008, 02:38:08 pm »

He already has a excellent track record.


Prove it.

http://knowbeforeyouvote.com

Please go ahead and disprove the information here.

Come on Monique, Tom H, and others let's have more than just Oprah's endorsement as a valid campaign debate.

 Smiley
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Jeremy Dokken
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« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2008, 04:10:39 pm »

Quote
I have shown proof of why you shouldn't. http://knowbeforeyouvote.com

That's a pro-Ron Paul site, Volitzer, the info there favors him.

Quote
He has literally been caught campaigning against NAFTA all the while taking money from corporate interests who stand to benefit from more free-trade deals. Obama literally tells them, 'Don't worry I'm just pandering to my base.' Now from what I know about women they usually hate being lied to.

Clinton talking point.  I suppose you are talking about the story before the Ohio primary where one of his advisors met with the Canadians about NAFTA?  The Canadian government stated that the discussions they had did not differ (in any way) from his public position, which is that the provisions for American workers for NAFTA would be re-evaluated once he was in office.

The reason why this was even a story was because the conservative Canadian government (assisted by the Clinton people) released the info to try and affect the American elections.

Quote
So tell me again why I should vote for Obama other than the fact he knows how to charm the masses.

Because he will bring the troops home from Iraq, stop illegal wiretaps, intrusions on people's privacy, not wage the upcoming war with Iran and, I imagine, bring a little economic fairness back to the poor and middle class!  Vote for McCain or Ron Paul and you just get more of the same.  Paul's policies favor the rich, whether you want to admit it or not.
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Jeremy Dokken
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« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2008, 04:14:52 pm »

Pundits declare the race over
 
By Jim Rutenberg
Published: May 7, 2008
 
Very early Wednesday morning, after many voters had already gone to sleep, the conventional wisdom of the elite political pundit class that resides on television shifted hard, and possibly irretrievably, against Senator Hillary Clinton's continued viability as a presidential candidate.
The moment came shortly after midnight Eastern time, captured in a devastatingly declarative statement from Tim Russert of NBC News: "We now know who the Democratic nominee's going to be, and no one's going to dispute it," he said on MSNBC. "Those closest to her will give her a hard-headed analysis, and if they lay it all out, they'll say: 'What is the rationale? What do we say to the undeclared super delegates tomorrow? Why do we tell them you're staying in the race?' And tonight, there's no good answer for that."
It was not exactly Walter Cronkite declaring that the Vietnam War would end in stalemate. But the impact was apparent almost immediately, starting with The Drudge Report, the online news billboard that is the home page to many political reporters in Washington and news producers in New York. It had as its lead story a link to a YouTube clip of Russert's comments, accompanied by a photograph of a beaming Obama with his wife, Michelle, and the headline, "The Nominee."
The thought echoed throughout the world of instant political analysis, steamrolling the Clinton campaign's attempts to promote the idea that her victory in Indiana was nonetheless an upset in the face of Obama's heavy spending and his campaign's predictions that he would win there, or that she could still come back if delegates in Florida and Michigan are seated.
"I think there's an increasing presumption tonight that Obama's going to be the nominee," Chris Wallace, the Fox News host, said to Karl Rove, President George W. Bush's longtime political guru, who is now a Fox News analyst. The statement preceded a discussion about what a general election race would look like between Obama and the presumptive Republican nominee, Senator John McCain.
Today in Americas
 
Clinton vows to fight on as Obama widens delegate lead
 
U.S. indicts Russian on four terrorism charges
 
UN watchdog groups denounce 5 nations vying to join rights council
 
 
A posting on the DailyKos Web site included a mock memo to Clinton titled, "To-Do List Before Dropping Out."
Speaking on CNN, David Gergen, a former adviser to several presidents, including Clinton's husband, said, "I think the Clinton people know the game is almost up."
Stating it more bluntly, Bob Franken, the political analyst, told the MSNBC host Dan Abrams shortly after 2 a.m. Eastern time, "Let's put it right on the table: It's over. It's over."
And it picked up again on the major morning news programs in a devastating cascade of sound bites for Clinton and her campaign.
Bob Schieffer on the CBS News program "Early Show": "Basically, Maggie, this race is over."
George Stephanopoulos on the ABC program "Good Morning America": "This nomination fight is over."
Matt Lauer on the NBC News program " Today": "Good morning, is it over?"
The commentary was punctuated by some brutal morning newspaper headlines: "Toast!" blared The New York Post; "Hil Needs a Miracle" declared The New York Daily News.
Of course, the political news media have not exactly showered themselves in glory this year. They have frequently made predictions that have been upended by actual votes from actual people.
But their opinions matter as much as ever in this late phase of the primary race, when Clinton and Obama are battling to sway the opinions of the uncommitted superdelegates the party leaders and elected officials with automatic convention seats, whose support Clinton will need if she is to snatch the nomination from Obama.
The superdelegates are a largely elite group that presumably will track the conventional wisdom of Washington's class of political insiders as they weigh their decisions. And the big donors and fund-raisers whose help Clinton will need to continue her campaign are similarly tapped into the news media echo-sphere.
Clinton's campaign indicated early this morning that it would try to prove the commentariat wrong once again. "Pundits have gleefully counted Senator Clinton out before, and each time they have been wrong, because they don't decide this race voters do," Howard Wolfson, Clinton's communications director, wrote in an e-mail message. "And as the results in Indiana demonstrated, voters are rewarding Senator Clinton with victories, even in states Senator Obama predicted victory in."
Wolfson's statement came in quick response to a request for comment that was sent to him by e-mail after 2 a.m. Eastern time an indication of the campaign's eagerness to undo the new conventional wisdom before it hardens.
And the campaign held a conference call with reporters this morning to send the clear signal that nothing had changed overnight.
Pointing to Clinton's victory in Indiana, and her inroads with what he called swing voters, Geoff Garin, her lead strategist, told the gathered reporters, "We think the results last night strengthen the case that she will be the strongest candidate for the Democratic Party in November."
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/05/07/america/07cndpundits.php

Asked if the harsh assessments on television and in the blogosphere would not drive superdelegates to Obama, Wolfson said, "Thankfully for us the punditocracy does not control this nominating process voters do and voters gave us an important victory in Indiana."
The Clinton campaign initially had some reason for optimism earlier Wednesday.
Many of the gloomier assessments of her chances came late Tuesday night and early this morning, when it appeared that she would not win Indiana as easily as exit polls and early vote tallies indicated earlier in the night. By then, early newspaper deadlines had passed and many voters were probably either asleep or off watching Jay Leno or David Letterman.
If East Coast viewers of "NCIS" saw no news the rest of the night, they certainly went to bed believing that Clinton's campaign was still there to fight another day. CBS, which broadcasts the show, declared that she had won the Indiana primary at 8:09 p.m. Eastern time, and Jeff Greenfield, the CBS analyst, reported, "We go on to June 3, Hillary Clinton got the win she needs to press her case."
Even as Clinton's real-vote lead over Obama in the state dwindled to just 16,000 as later returns came in, the CBS News Web site held on to its headline, "Clinton Wins Ind., Obama Takes N.C."
The headline was vindicated when several other news organizations declared that Clinton had indeed won in Indiana, five hours after CBS made its projection. And it is that view of Tuesday's results that most voters awoke to on Wednesday: A split decision for Clinton and Obama, no matter how narrow.
The question is, will the analysts be talking that way throughout the day and if not, where does it leave Clinton?
As of this afternoon, the climb for her seemed steeper. Obama's campaign responded to the Clinton conference call with one of its own that included some big-name party leaders and superdelegates, among them the last Democratic nominee, Senator John Kerry, who declared, "Barack Obama took a giant and possibly decisive step toward the nomination." Minutes earlier, CNN had broken in with news from The Associated Press: Another former nominee was breaking for Obama, former Senator George McGovern, of South Dakota, which will vote along with Montana on June 3, the last primaries of the contest.
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Jeremy Dokken
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« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2008, 04:15:23 pm »

CONGRESSIONAL SOURCE: Hillary having trouble finding superdelegates who will meet with her... 'No one wants to see her today'... Developing...
http://drudgereport.com/
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Volitzer
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« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2008, 04:39:00 pm »

Quote
I have shown proof of why you shouldn't. http://knowbeforeyouvote.com

That's a pro-Ron Paul site, Volitzer, the info there favors him.

Quote
He has literally been caught campaigning against NAFTA all the while taking money from corporate interests who stand to benefit from more free-trade deals. Obama literally tells them, 'Don't worry I'm just pandering to my base.' Now from what I know about women they usually hate being lied to.

Clinton talking point.  I suppose you are talking about the story before the Ohio primary where one of his advisors met with the Canadians about NAFTA?  The Canadian government stated that the discussions they had did not differ (in any way) from his public position, which is that the provisions for American workers for NAFTA would be re-evaluated once he was in office.

The reason why this was even a story was because the conservative Canadian government (assisted by the Clinton people) released the info to try and affect the American elections.

Quote
So tell me again why I should vote for Obama other than the fact he knows how to charm the masses.

Because he will bring the troops home from Iraq, stop illegal wiretaps, intrusions on people's privacy, not wage the upcoming war with Iran and, I imagine, bring a little economic fairness back to the poor and middle class!  Vote for McCain or Ron Paul and you just get more of the same.  Paul's policies favor the rich, whether you want to admit it or not.

Prove it.

The only thing I ever hear Obama say is "We need change !!"  So does Sheryl Crow but I wouldn't elect her based on that.



Obama's campaign rhetoric in musical form.   Wink

All I'm asking is a track record supplied by someone else other than myself here.

We have 984 or more members here now surely someone of the other 983 can post something that puts some facts behind Obama.
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