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Obama Wins Big in North Carolina, Indiana still too close to call

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Kristina
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« on: May 06, 2008, 08:47:26 pm »



Obama claims victory in North Carolina

Barack Obama will win today's primary in North Carolina, giving him a larger share of its 115 delegates, CNN projects. It's still too early to call the race in Indiana, where Hillary Clinton is hoping to pick up more of the 72 delegates at stake. "We will be united in November," Obama told supporters. developing story
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Kristina
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« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2008, 08:52:15 pm »

Obama takes North Carolina, CNN projects

Story Highlights
NEW: Too early to call race in Indiana

NEW: Obama wins in North Carolina, CNN projects

187 delegates are at stake in Tuesday's primaries


     
(CNN) -- Sen. Barack Obama will win the North Carolina Democratic primary, CNN projects, but it is too early to call Indiana because not enough results are in from key areas.




Sen. Barack Obama thanks his supporters in Raleigh, North Carolina.

1 of 2 As North Carolina results came in, Obama was leading Sen. Hillary Clinton by a margin of roughly 57-41.

The win will give him the larger share of the state's 115 delegates.

"Some were saying that North Carolina would be a game-changer in this election. But today, what North Carolina decided is that the only game that needs changing is the one in Washington," Obama told supporters in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Obama congratulated Clinton on what he called her apparent victory in Indiana.

Obama took an overwhelming 91 percent of the black vote in North Carolina, according to exit polls, while Clinton claimed only 6 percent.

Clinton took 59 percent of the white vote compared to 36 percent for Obama, according to the polls.

With 75 percent of Indiana precincts reporting, Clinton was leading Obama, 52-48 percent.

There are 72 delegates at stake in Indiana.

Poll workers in Indiana and North Carolina reported heavy turnout in the two primaries.

Turnout in the North Carolina Democratic primary was expected to reach 50 percent, according to Gary Bartlett, executive director for the North Carolina Board of Elections.

That figure would far exceed the 15 percent to 30 percent that usually turn out for a primary, he said.

The Indiana secretary of state's office said turnout was high throughout the day.

Indiana Secretary of State Todd Rokita will not release official figures until the end of the day, but said turnout looked more like a general election than a primary.

A judge ordered some polling stations in Indiana to stay open past closing time because the lines were so long.

Polling officials in Indianapolis said they had set a record for voter turnout after being open for only six hours.  Watch the final push in North Carolina and Indiana »

According to early exit polls, half of Clinton's supporters in Indiana would not vote for Obama in a general election match up with Sen. John McCain, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.  Watch what the exit polls show »

A third of Clinton voters said they would pick McCain over Obama, while 17 percent said they would not vote at all. Forty-eight percent of Clinton supporters said they would back Obama in November.

Obama got even less support from Clinton backers in North Carolina where 45 percent of Clinton supporters said they would vote for him over McCain. Thirty-eight percent of Clinton supporters said they would vote for McCain while 12 percent said they would not vote.

Obama voters appear to be more willing to support Clinton in November. In Indiana, 59 percent of Obama backers said they'd vote for Clinton, and 70 percent of Obama backers in North Carolina said vote for her against McCain.

Obama on Tuesday said he didn't agree with those who said his party would not be able to unite.

"Tonight, many of the pundits have suggested that this party is inalterably divided -- that Sen. Clinton's supporters will not support me, and that my supporters will not support her," he said.

"I'm here tonight to tell you that I don't believe it. Yes, there have been bruised feelings on both sides. Yes, each side desperately wants their candidate to win. But ultimately, this race is not about Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama or John McCain.

"This election is about you -- the American people -- and whether we will have a president and a party that can lead us toward a brighter future."

Voters from both states were spilt over the controversy surrounding Obama's former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, early exit polls suggest.

In Indiana, 49 percent of voters in the Democratic primary said the issue was not important, compared to 48 percent who said it was an important factor in their vote.

In North Carolina 50 percent of voters said the Wright controversy was important, and 48 percent said it was not.

In both states, those who said it was an important issue largely broke for Clinton, and those who said it was not backed Obama.

Obama currently leads in pledged delegates and in states won, and he is ahead in the popular vote, if Florida and Michigan are not factored into the equation. Those states are being penalized for moving their primaries up in violation of party rules.

In all, only 404 pledged delegates remain to be chosen, and Tuesday's total of 187 makes it the biggest single primary day left. Clinton would need to win 70 percent of the remaining pledged delegates to catch up with Obama.

With neither candidate expected to win the 2,025 delegates needed to clinch the Democratic nomination by June 3, the end of the primary season, the final decision will most likely fall to the 796 superdelegates: Democratic governors, members of Congress and party officials.

Both candidates have spent the past two weeks shuttling between Indiana and North Carolina, each arguing to crucial working-class voters that their rival is out of touch when it comes to the pocketbook issues that are dominating the campaign.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/05/06/primaries.change/index.html
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Kristina
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« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2008, 08:55:33 pm »

Obama: 'We need change in America'Posted: 09:27 PM ET


 
Obama addresses supporters at a primary election night rally in Raleigh, North Carolina.
RALEIGH, North Carolina (CNN) – Barack Obama celebrated a clear victory in North Carolina's Democratic primary Tuesday, congratulating Hillary Clinton for her apparent win in Indiana while dismissing pundits who say the Democrats are hopelessly divided between the two.

"This fall, we intend to march forward as one Democratic party, united by a common vision for this country, because we all agree at this defining moment in our history — a moment when we are facing two wars, an economy in turmoil, a planet in peril, a dream that feels like it's slipping away for too many americans. We can't afford to give John McCain the chance to serve out George Bush's third term," the Illinois senator told supporters. "We need change in America."

Filed under: Barack Obama



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Kristina
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« Reply #3 on: May 06, 2008, 08:56:29 pm »

Schneider: Did 'Operation Chaos' succeed in Indiana?
Posted: 09:45 PM ET



 
Limbaugh’s ‘Operation Chaos’ plan was to have republican voters temporarily cross over to vote in the Democratic primary for Hillary Clinton.
(CNN) – How big of an impact did Rush Limbaugh’s ‘Operation Chaos’ have in Indiana? Did GOP voters really cross over to create havoc in the Democratic primary by voting for Hillary Clinton, as he’d asked his listeners to do?

Roughly one in ten of the state’s Democratic primary voters were Republican — and that group did vote for Hillary Clinton, 53 to 47 percent over Barack Obama. But hold on: registered Democrats, who made up two-thirds of Tuesday’s primary voters, gave roughly the same edge to Clinton, 53 to 45 percent. Only Independents — who made up about a quarter of the electorate — voted for Obama, 53 to 47 percent.

For whatever reason, self-identified conservative voters did overwhelmingly support Clinton – two out of three cast their votes for the New York senator.

From: CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider
Filed under: Barack Obama

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« Reply #4 on: May 06, 2008, 08:57:23 pm »

Schneider: The age divide
Posted: 09:03 PM ET


 
(CNN) – Who you backed in Indiana seems to have been based, to some extent, on your birthday – a fact that’s working in Hillary Clinton’s favor.

Voters in most age groups were almost evenly split – except for the youngest and oldest voters.

Sixty-three percent of voters under age 24 backed Barack Obama. But twice as many seniors went to the polls – and 72 percent of them voted for Clinton.

In North Carolina, Obama won young voters 70 to 28 percent, and lost the senior vote to Clinton – but her advantage, though still significant, came by a slightly smaller margin: 57 to 39 percent. Limiting his losses among older voters was a big factor in his win.

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Kristina
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« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2008, 08:58:24 pm »

Schneider: Gender politics take a backseat
Posted: 08:37 PM ET


 
(CNN) – Gender gap? What gender gap?

Indiana’s Democratic primary vote was not dramatically divided along gender lines. Men split their votes almost evenly between Clinton and Obama, 51 to 49 percent. Women still gave the edge to Hillary Clinton – but by only six points, 53 to 47 percent.

There was little sign of a split between the sexes in North Carolina either: 57 percent of the state’s men cast their votes for Barack Obama – but so did 54 percent of women voters.
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« Reply #6 on: May 06, 2008, 08:59:18 pm »

Schneider: Late deciders go for Clinton
Posted: 08:12 PM ET
 


(CNN) — Even in a loss, last-minute deciders keep going Hillary Clinton’s way: in North Carolina, Barack Obama had the edge among voters who made their primary pick within the last month, or even earlier. But those who made their decision on their way to the polls again went for Clinton, 55 to 42 percent.

In Indiana, she added early deciders to the mix: voters in nearly every category there gave the advantage to the New York senator.

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« Reply #7 on: May 06, 2008, 09:02:39 pm »

Schneider: Obama got more than a one-third of N.C.'s white vote
Posted: 08:00 PM ET
 


Schneider: Obama got 36 percent of white voters in North Carolina's Democratic primary.

(CNN) — In this clip, Senior Political Analyst Bill Schneider explains the racial break-down of North Carolina voters who supported Sen. Barack Obama in Tuesday's primary.

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« Reply #8 on: May 06, 2008, 09:03:55 pm »

Schneider: A few keys to Obama’s N.C. win
Posted: 07:57 PM ET



(CNN) – How did Obama do it? His overwhelming support among black voters in North Carolina certainly gave him a major edge – although only one in three primary voters Tuesday night fell into that demographic.

But Obama won every age group except voters 60 and older – by more than 35 points among those younger than 45. And Clinton’s edge with seniors – she won voters 60 and older 54 to 43 percent – wasn’t high enough to compensate.

And remember that voter registration? Obama won those first-time voters, 62 to 28 percent. The results among first-time primary voters – a group that includes Independents and Republicans weighing in for the first time in a Democratic contest – show the party’s fears of GOP mischief seem to have been off the mark: that group supported Obama by an even greater margin, 68 to 26 percent.

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« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2008, 12:42:00 am »

http://knowbeforeyouvote.com

Focus people... focus.
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