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CNN projects: Clinton wins Pennsylvania

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Kristina
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« on: April 22, 2008, 08:29:16 pm »



CNN projects: Clinton wins Pennsylvania

Sen. Hillary Clinton will win the Pennsylvania primary, CNN projects. Clinton earlier acknowledged her White House bid was on the line in the state. The win would allow her to pick up a majority of the 158 delegates at stake in Pennsylvania and make a small dent in Obama's lead

PHILADELPHIA, Pennsylvania (CNN) -- Sen. Hillary Clinton will win the Pennsylvania Democratic primary, CNN projects based on early returns.




Sen. Hilllary Clinton visits Tuesday with people at a polling station in Conshohocken, Pennsylvania.

1 of 2more photos »  With 15 percent of precincts reporting, she was leading Barack Obama 53-47 percent.

Obama scored big with new Democrats in Pennsylvania, early exit polls show.

One out of every seven Democratic party voters was not registered as a Democrat at the beginning of the year, and 60 percent of them cast their ballot for Obama, according to the exit polls.

Clinton fared better with voters who made up their mind in the last week, the exit polls showed.

Fifty-eight percent of those voters said they chose the New York senator. That includes voters who made up their mind in the aftermath of last week's heated Democratic debate. See the exit polls

African-American voters in Pennsylvania supported Obama by a substantial margin. According to exit polls, 92 percent cast their vote for the Illinois senator, compared to 8 percent for Clinton.

Clinton got the support of older voters, with 61 percent of those 65 years or older backing her, according to the polls.

She also received more support than Obama among white males, with 55 percent voting for her.

Clinton on Tuesday acknowledged her White House bid was on the line in Pennsylvania.


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"Well, I have to win," Clinton told ABC. "I believe that's my task. And I'm going to do everything I can to win."

Calling Pennsylvania an "uphill climb," Obama declined to predict a victory in the primary, but said his campaign showed he can compete in a big state.

Obama said "we feel good about where we are," but appeared prepared for a victory by Clinton.

"A win is 50 plus one. So, if Sen. Clinton gets over 50 percent she's won the state and, you know, I don't try to pretend that I enjoy getting 45 percent and that's a moral victory -- we've lost the state," Obama said during a stop in South Philadelphia.  Watch what Obama says about the primary »

"What I do believe is that we're coming to the end of this process. We've won twice as many states, we've won the popular vote by fairly substantial margins, we've got a very big lead in pledged delegates and we competed, win or lose," he said.  Watch Obama enjoy pancakes in Pittsburgh »

The race has generated high interest in the state.

Pennsylvania Secretary of State Pedro Cortes said he thought the turnout would be a record for a primary, with some counties reporting 50 and 60 percent of voters showing up at the polls.

"Pennsylvanians have seen, in terms of participation, in terms of interest, what feels like a general election -- a presidential general election -- as opposed to a presidential state primary where there's hardly any interest," Cortes said.

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About 4 million Democrats were registered to vote in Pennsylvania.

In recent weeks, Clinton has fended off calls to drop out of the race as the increasingly bruising primary fight raised worries from within the party that the daily cycle of charge-and-countercharge could hurt the Democrats' chances in the general election.

Obama leads in the delegate count -- 1,648 to 1,504, CNN estimates -- as well as the popular vote and the number of states won so far this primary season. See how the delegate race has played out so far

Clinton's victory will give her a majority of the 158 delegates at stake in Pennsylvania and make a small dent in Obama's lead.  Call races for yourself and see how delegates add up »

"If she wins Pennsylvania by a hefty margin, she can prove she can win the traditional Democratic constituencies needed to win the election, mostly white working-class voters," said Gloria Borger, a CNN senior political analyst.

Could a double-digit victory make Clinton the comeback kid once again?

"If Clinton wins by more than 10 points, which was her margin in neighboring Ohio and New Jersey, her campaign will have new momentum and she will soldier on," said Bill Schneider, also a CNN senior political analyst.  Watch how the polls show Clinton leading »

"If Clinton wins by single digits, we're in a political twilight zone. Nothing changes."

Neither candidate is expected to win the 2,025 delegates needed to clinch the nomination by the end of the primary season in June.

The superdelegates -- party leaders and officials -- then could decide the nomination.

Many factors were in Clinton's favor in Pennsylvania. The state has a lot of older, working-class and Catholic voters, all of whom have made up Clinton's base so far.  Watch where the crucial voting areas are »

Clinton also has the backing of many of the state's top Democrats, including Gov. Ed Rendell and the mayors of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, the state's two largest cities.  Watch how Gov. Rendell and Gov. Richardson views the race »

Obama has the backing of the state's only Democratic senator, Bob Casey Jr.

After Pennsylvania, Indiana and North Carolina hold votes in two weeks as the primary season rolls on toward its end in June. E-mail to a friend

CNN's Paul Steinhauser and Chris Welch contributed to this report.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/04/22/pa.primary/index.html
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Kristina
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2008, 08:30:56 pm »

Exit polls: gun owners choose Clinton
Posted: 09:00 PM ET

(CNN) — According to early exit polling, 36 percent of the voters in today's Pennsylvania Democratic primary have a gun owner in the household. This group voted for Hillary Clinton over Barack Obama, 60 percent to 40 percent.
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Kristina
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« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2008, 08:32:32 pm »

Exit polls: Race, gender play role
Posted: 08:22 PM ET


 
Voters cast their ballots in Oakmont, PA.
(CNN) – Race and gender may have played a role in the Democratic primary results, the exit polls show.

Twenty percent of Pennsylvania Democrats said the race of a candidate played an important role in determining their vote. Clinton won those voters by nearly 20 percentage points, 59 percent to 41 percent.

Twenty percent of voters in neighboring Ohio, which voted last month, also said race helped decide their vote – and went for Clinton by 20 percentage points, 59-39.

Twenty-one percent of Pennsylvania primary voters said the gender of a candidate was an important factor in how they voted. Clinton overwhelmingly won among those voters, 71 percent to 29 percent.

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Kristina
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2008, 08:34:04 pm »

Exit polls:  No "Bitter-gate" fallout

Posted: 08:39 PM ET


 
(CNN) – Was there any fallout from the so-called "bitter-gate?"

On the whole, no, the exit polls suggest.

Hillary Clinton seized on Barack Obama's now famous comments about small town Americans, characterizing them as elitist and suggesting the Illinois senator is out of touch with many small-town Americans.

But Pennsylvania Democrats said Tuesday night they don't view Obama any more out of touch than Clinton: 66 percent of Pennsylvania Democrats said Clinton is in touch with people like them, while 65 percent said the same for Obama.

Translation: The elitist charge on Obama, at least among Democrats, does not appear to have stuck.

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Kristina
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« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2008, 08:35:12 pm »

Exit polls: Obama viewed as more honest than Clinton
Posted: 08:20 PM ET
 


(CNN) – Pennsylvania Democrats view Barack Obama as more trustworthy than Hillary Clinton.

According to the exit polls, 67 percent of Pennsylvania Democrats said they believed Obama was honest and trustworthy while only 54 percent said the same for Clinton.

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Kristina
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2008, 08:36:34 pm »

Exit polls: Clinton blamed for more unfair attacks
Posted: 07:17 PM ET


 
(CNN) – The Democratic presidential race has taken a negative turn over the last several weeks — and most Pennsylvania Democrats appear to blame Hillary Clinton.

According to the exit polls, two thirds of Pennsylvania Democrats say Clinton has launched unfair attacks against Barack Obama. Only 30 percent of voters say she hasn't.

Meanwhile, 49 percent of Pennsylvania Democrats said Obama has attacked Clinton unfairly while 48 percent say he has not.

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Kristina
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2008, 08:37:42 pm »

Exit polls: Religious voters show up in large numbers
Posted: 07:06 PM ET


 
(CNN) – Religious voters were the subject of much speculation before the Pennsylvania primary. Early exit polling shows 39 percent of today's voters attend church weekly. Fifty-nine percent of them voted for Hillary Clinton while 41 percent voted for Barack Obama. Forty-three percent of today's voters say they attend church occasionally. Of this group, 51 percent went for Clinton and 49 percent went for Obama.

Thirty-six percent of today's Democratic primary voters were Catholic. Twenty-seven percent of today's voters were Protestant. Thirteen percent descibed themselves as "other Christian." Ten percent say they have no religion and 7 percent of today's voters were Jewish.

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Kristina
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2008, 08:42:43 pm »

Exit polls: Pennsylvania Dems think Obama will win
Posted: 06:10 PM ET


 
Obama addresses the crowd at the University of Pittsburgh.
(CNN) – Barack Obama will win the Democratic nomination, a majority of Pennsylvania voters believe.

According to the exit polls, 54 percent of primary voters said Obama will be the party's nominee while 43 percent said Clinton will win.

In what could be a troubling sign, only 38 percent of voters said they'd be satisfied if either candidate was the nominee. Meanwhile 32 percent said they'd be satisfied only if Clinton wins, while 25 percent said they'd be satisfied only if Obama wins.

For the time being at least, the party is sharply divided between these two candidates.

From: CNN Senior Political Analyst Bill
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Kristina
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2008, 08:46:02 pm »

Exit polls: How did Clinton win?
Posted: 09:25 PM ET
 


(CNN) — CNN just called the Pennsylvania primary race for Hillary Clinton. How did she win?

Her clear support from white voters and women. Both groups constituted large majorities in Tuesday's primary, and both voted for Clinton handily.

Whites made up over 80 percent of Pennsylvania Democrats. Clinton bested Obama among those voters by 20 points, 60 to 40 percent.

Women also constituted a clear majority of Pennsylvania primary voters – 56 percent. They voted for Clinton by a 12-point margin, 56 to 44 percent.

Another reason Clinton won? She beat Obama easily among late-deciders. Those voters who decided in the last three days went for the New York senator by a 15-point margin, 57 percent to 42 percent.

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Kristina
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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2008, 08:54:40 pm »

This looks like it will be a six to eight point victory for Hillary Clinton so far, and she will probably net about fourteen delegates from it.

The bad news?  She is behind by about 160 delegates and needed a bigger victory. According to Chuck Todd from MSNBC, she will need to win the remaining contests by 80% just to pull even with Obama in delegates.

Bad blood is also resulting between the two camps with about 30% of each supporter saying they will not support the other were they the nominee, or they shall stay home and not vote.
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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2008, 10:58:12 am »

Analysis: Did Clinton's latest victory come in time?
Story Highlights
Clinton's 10-point margin of victory was larger than recent polls had shown

Obama's loss in another big state raises electability questions

Hours after Clinton's victory, the campaign says it raised $2.5 million


Next Article in Politics »


 Read  VIDEO  PHOTOS INTERACTIVE
By John Helton
CNN
     
(CNN) -- Hillary Clinton scored a big victory in Pennsylvania on Tuesday to keep her hopes for the Democratic nomination alive. The question is whether the win came soon enough.




Sen. Hillary Clinton scored a must victory in Pennsylvania, but will it be enough?

1 of 2more photos »  Barack Obama's loss in another big state and the margins by which he lost among blue-collar and rural voters on Tuesday, on the other hand, may raise questions about his electability.

Some polls had shown Clinton with a double-digit lead in Pennsylvania. But in the weeks between the last primaries in Ohio and Texas, Obama had whittled down Clinton's advantage.

Clinton's 10-point margin of victory was larger than recent polls had shown; all had her winning but some of them showed only 4 or 5 percentage points between the candidates.  Watch Clinton claim victory »

But because Democratic delegates are allotted proportionally according to the vote, Clinton's Pennsylvania win does little to cut into Obama's lead among pledged delegates or his advantage in the popular vote count.  Watch Obama congratulate Clinton »

The results in Pennsylvania followed trends set in previous contests: Clinton won the white vote, Obama won the black vote; Clinton won the older vote, Obama won the younger vote; Clinton won in rural areas, Obama carried the urban vote.  Watch what Obama's campaign says about the results »

Look for Clinton to head into upcoming contests with the message that Obama can't win in the big states like Pennsylvania and Ohio that Democrats will need to regain the White House.

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The focus is now on the next two contests on May 6: Indiana and North Carolina. Polls show Obama has a comfortable lead in North Carolina but Clinton won't give up on the state. Her husband, former President Bill Clinton, will be campaigning there on Wednesday.

It's doubtful that Clinton can overtake Obama in North Carolina; he has won all the southern states and their large black populations except for Arkansas, where Clinton was first lady when Bill Clinton was governor.

But part of the reason the Clintons will campaign in North Carolina is to make it necessary for Obama to spend more time there and away from Indiana, where polls show a tight race.

Obama needs a victory in Indiana to prove that he can win a large rust-belt state to bolster his case that he can carry the states needed to beat Sen. John McCain, the presumptive Republican nominee.

Clinton has to cut into Obama's base to gain ground. And barring a major misstep by the Obama campaign, her best chance may hinge on attacking Obama and raising doubts in voters' minds.

Clinton's challenging Obama's electability is also aimed at Democratic superdelegates, the elected officials and party leaders who are free to vote for whichever candidate they choose.

With neither candidate able to reach the 2,025 delegates needed for the nomination, those superdelegates will decide who gets the nomination.  Call races for yourself and see how delegates add up »

The outcome in Pennsylvania will certainly have an impact on those superdelegates -- the pressure is on them to vote along the lines of the popular vote. But they'll also consider who has the momentum going into the general election. See how the delegate race has played out so far

Momentum will also help Clinton raise money, in which she has trailed Obama. Indeed, in the hours following her victory on Tuesday, the campaign says it raised $2.5 million.


Clinton told supporters in her victory speech that "the tide has turned." It's more like she's slowed the wave of momentum that appeared ready to carry Obama to the party's nomination.

Whether she did it soon enough is one question. Another issue: the longer the two candidates bang away at each other in the primaries, the less time there will be to repair the damage before the eventual nominee must turn his or her attention toward McCain. E-mail to a friend

CNN Political Editor Mark Preston contributed to this report.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/04/23/primary.analysis/index.html
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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2008, 11:11:30 am »

1Final numbers: 1,258,245 Clinton, 1,042,297 Obama, total votes 2,300,542. That's 54.7% Clinton, 46.3% Obama (slight rounding).

So, Hillary will actually win PA by about 8 points, which makes it no longer a double digit victory.
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