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Art & Literature Throughout the Ages - Original

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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #45 on: November 20, 2008, 03:13:48 pm »

Helios

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   posted 07-24-2006 02:08 AM                       
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The Colossus of Rhodes may have only stood fifty-six years, and yet it lay on the ground, split off at the legs, for some six hundred. Then, when the Arabs invaded the island, one of their traders carted it off to the Middle East, using a great number of camels. We must assume that they had to break it apart even more to transport it.

In recent years, they have made plans to rebuild the Colossus, but, as far as I know they haven't gotten off the ground yet.

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"This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was an island situated in front of the straits called the Pillars of Heracles; the island was larger than Libya and Asia put together..."

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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #46 on: November 20, 2008, 03:14:01 pm »

rockessence

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   posted 07-24-2006 03:03 AM                       
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A Wonder Destroyed...

"After Ice-Time the original Aser rebuilt their old capital called Hel (clear; whole; home; complete) or Hel-stad. They founded a new center in Nyslott (Olavin-linna) from whence they populated all the land eastwards to the Pi-Kingdom of China. Via Götland and Åland they sent two sons of the As-King to establish two more "races" or "rays" as from the Sun (the father of all things)! They originated the Kingdoms of Sweden and Denmark, the home of all European nobility.


"When the Vatican seized control of northern Europe they equipped a huge army from middle Europe to invade and demolish the oldest city in Europe, Hel. In 1050 they arrived and the whole coastal area of 270 km around Helsinki was ransacked. All its citizens were killed by sword or fire and many "heathen" temples, treasures and buildings were completely destroyed."

http://www.bocksaga.com/articles/bo_olsson/thenordicconnection.html

One of the great stone buildings destroyed was the real and true Valhalla. The Vatican mercenary army dismantled it, and in the middle of winter, dragged every bit of it out onto the frozen Bay of Finland to be swallowed up in the spring thaw.

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"Illigitimi non carborundum!"
All knowledge is to be used in the manner that will give help and assistance to others, and the desire is that the laws of the Creator be manifested in the physical world. E.Cayce 254-17

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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #47 on: November 20, 2008, 03:14:10 pm »

Jennifer O'Dell

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   posted 07-24-2006 03:33 AM                       
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Boy did that Vatican destroy a lot of pagan stuff over the years. I guess to them the ends justified the means.
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #48 on: November 20, 2008, 03:14:22 pm »

Amy Lewton

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   posted 07-24-2006 09:39 PM                       
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You have to wonder what the Colossus of Rhodes actually looked like, what pose it was in. I heard that they actually made it with it's legs apart, which would have explained why it broke apart in the earthquake. To actually straddle the harbor, it would have had to have been twice as big as the 100 feet it was supposed to be.
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #49 on: November 20, 2008, 03:15:08 pm »

Nicole Jimmelson

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   posted 07-25-2006 12:15 AM                       
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My favorite painting of all time has to be the Scream, by Edward Munch - there were actually four of it, and one is missing to this day:

The Scream (Skrik, 1893) is a seminal expressionist painting by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. Regarded by many as his most important work, it is said by some to symbolize modern man taken by an attack of existential angst. The landscape in the background is Oslofjord, viewed from the hill of Ekeberg. The Norwegian word skrik is usually translated as "scream", but is cognate with the English shriek. Occasionally, the painting has been called The Cry.

There is a tempera on cardboard version (measuring 83.5 x 66 cm) formerly in the Munch Museum, Oslo, Norway (shown below), and an oil, tempera, and pastel on cardboard (measuring 91 x 73.5 cm) in the National Gallery (shown to right), also in Oslo. A third version is also owned by the Munch Museum, and a fourth is owned by Petter Olsen. Munch later also translated the picture into a lithograph (shown below), so the image could be reproduced in reviews all over the world. However, one version is currently missing from the Munch Museum, having been stolen by art thieves in August 2004.

Sources of inspiration

Munch translated The Scream into lithograph in 1895 so that it could be reproduced all over the world.Munch described his inspiration for the image thus:

I was walking along a path with two friends – the sun was setting – suddenly the sky turned blood red – I paused, feeling exhausted, and leaned on the fence – there was blood and tongues of fire above the blue-black fjord and the city – my friends walked on, and I stood there trembling with anxiety – and I sensed an infinite scream passing through nature.
This has led some commentators to propose that the person in the painting is not screaming, but reacting with despair to the "scream passing through nature".

The scene is from a road overlooking Oslo, the Oslofjord and Hovedøya, from the hill of Ekeberg. At the time of painting the work, Munch's manic depressive sister Laura Catherine was interned in the mental hospital at the foot of Ekeberg.

In 1978, the renowned Munch scholar Robert Rosenblum suggested that the strange, sexless creature in the foreground of the painting was probably inspired by a Peruvian mummy which Munch could have seen at the 1889 Exposition Universelle in Paris. This mummy, which was crouching in foetal position with its hands alongside its face, also struck the imagination of Munch's friend Paul Gauguin: it stood model for the central figure in his painting Human misery (Grape harvest at Arles) and for the old woman at the left in his painting Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?. More recently, an Italian anthropologist speculated that Munch might have seen a mummy in Florence's Museum of Natural History which bears an even more striking resemblance to the painting[1].

In 2003, astronomers claimed to have identified the time that the painting depicted. The volcanic eruption of Krakatoa in 1883 caused unusually intense sunsets throughout Europe in the winter of 1883-4, which Munch captured in his picture[2].


Thefts

Thieves taking paintings from the Munch Museum, August 2004On 12 February 1994 the National Gallery's Scream was stolen. Initially the theft was linked to various anti-abortion groups active in Norway, but this turned out to be false. After three months, the painting was offered back to the Norwegian government for a ransom of USD $1 million. The ransom was refused, but the painting was nevertheless recovered on 7 May, following a sting operation organised by the Norwegian police with assistance from the British Police and the Getty Museum.

On August 22, 2004, the Munch Museum's Scream was stolen at gunpoint, along with Munch's Madonna. Museum officials expressed hope that they would see the painting again, theorizing that perhaps the thieves would seek ransom money. The paintings are still missing. On April 8, 2005, Norwegian police arrested a suspect in connection with the theft[3]. On April 28, 2005, it was rumoured that the two paintings had been burnt by the thieves to conceal evidence[4]. On June 1, 2005, the City Government of Oslo offered a reward of 2 million Norwegian kroner (about USD $320,000) for information that could help locate the paintings. In early 2006, six men with previous criminal records were scheduled to go on trial, variously charged with either helping to plan or execute the robbery. Three of the men were convicted and sentenced to between four and eight years in prison in May of 2006. Two of the convicted art thieves, Björn Hoen, 37, and Petter Tharaldsen, 34, were also ordered to pay 750 million kroner (US $122 million) to the City of Oslo which is where the paintings were previously located. [1] None of the suspects had been persuaded to reveal the paintings' current location, perhaps due to fear of retaliation. The Munch Museum itself was closed for 10 months for a $6 million security overhaul.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scream

[ 07-25-2006, 12:17 AM: Message edited by: Nicole Jimmelson ]
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #50 on: November 20, 2008, 03:15:44 pm »



This painting by Edvard Munch is in the public domain in the United States because it was first published more than 95 years ago. The painting is protected by copyright in Norway until 2015 (the life of the author + 70 years). The painting may also be covered by copyright in the countries of the European Union
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #51 on: November 20, 2008, 03:16:38 pm »



The Scream by artist Edvard Munch. Lithography, 1895.
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #52 on: November 20, 2008, 03:17:27 pm »


This version, executed in tempera on cardboard, was stolen from the Munch Museum in 2004, and recovered in 2006.

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« Reply #53 on: November 20, 2008, 03:18:05 pm »

rockessence

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   posted 07-25-2006 12:44 AM                       
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I got to see one of the SCREAM paintings in Oslo in 1969. It was situated right next to a window! As I recall, all the museums I visited that year were woefully under-guarded. In Amsterdam in the Rjiksmuseum, I spent a long while in a 12X12 foot dimly lit room all by myself with about six or seven Vermeers! None of the canvasses were too large to fit under my shirt! A ways across the museum there was a single permanent guard in the room with the huge "Nightwatch" by Rembrandt which had a velvet rope to hold back people from approaching the canvas.

Ah, I still think longingly of those delicious Vermeers!

[ 07-25-2006, 12:48 AM: Message edited by: rockessence ]

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"Illigitimi non carborundum!"
All knowledge is to be used in the manner that will give help and assistance to others, and the desire is that the laws of the Creator be manifested in the physical world. E.Cayce 254-17

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Posts: 3129 | From: Port Townsend WA | Registered: Feb 2004   
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #54 on: November 20, 2008, 03:18:21 pm »

Jennifer O'Dell

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   posted 07-25-2006 12:58 AM                       
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That's pretty cool, Rockessence, is that how your connection to Norway first began? Have you travelled there a lot?

Just how huge is the Nightwatch anyway?
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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #55 on: November 20, 2008, 03:18:43 pm »

rockessence

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   posted 07-25-2006 11:37 AM                       
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quote:
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Originally posted by Jennifer O'Dell:
That's pretty cool, Rockessence, is that how your connection to Norway first began? Have you travelled there a lot?

Just how huge is the Nightwatch anyway?
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Watch

The "Night Watch", Rembrandt, 1642
oil on canvas, 363 × 437 cm (11.91 feet by 14.39 feet)
I was standing about 10-15 feet back and it was pretty wide. My husband was a painter and some of his work was as big as 8X12 feet.

I went to a Rijksmuseum site and saw only 4 Vermeer's listed.... were there more then? I don't know.

The Milkmaid
The Love Letter
Woman in Blue reading a Letter
The Little Street

As to my interest in Norway/Scandinavia. I spent part of June and part of November 1969 there, with the sweetest family ever. I learned about Theodore Kittelsen, Tove Jansen (Mummintrollet), wartime events and politics. My friends father had been a political cartoonist and during the war he published a lot of cartoons about the Nazis and Hitler. His signature was a star, and no one knew who he was. When Norway was invaded by Germany, finding him was top priority. He was finally captured about a week before Germany lost the war, so just barely escaped being shipped off to a camp. His cell was next to the one holding my friend's mother, and the two became acquainted through tapping out a code. Later they married.

We visited him in Voss, a little town on a lake in the middle of Norway. He lived in an ancient small cabin on the hillside above the lake across from the town. We could watch the tiny train like a toy, chugging through the valley. I tried to make American style pancakes one morning and they were a dismal failure! He drew me a cartoon of himself blasting through the roof of his outhouse....with the label "Pancake I on it's way to Mars"....

My 1969 trip was amazing...I went to England first and then hitchhiked north to Norway and south all the way to North Africa and back again. Some amazing adventures.

[ 07-25-2006, 11:44 AM: Message edited by: rockessence ]

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"Illigitimi non carborundum!"
All knowledge is to be used in the manner that will give help and assistance to others, and the desire is that the laws of the Creator be manifested in the physical world. E.Cayce 254-17

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Crystal Thielkien
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« Reply #56 on: November 20, 2008, 03:19:54 pm »



De Nachtwacht (The Night Watch)
Rembrandt, 1642
Oil on canvas
363 × 437 cm, 142.9 × 172.0 in
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam
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« Reply #57 on: November 20, 2008, 03:20:34 pm »

 
Jennifer O'Dell

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   posted 07-26-2006 01:21 AM                       
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Sounds pretty cool, I didn't know the Night Watch was so huge.

The cartoonist signed his name with a star, like the star of David or something? Was he Jewish and that was the reason he was going off to the camps?

I would love to go to Norway someday. Have you ever met Boreasi in person, by the way?
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« Reply #58 on: November 20, 2008, 03:20:43 pm »

Devlin

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   posted 07-26-2006 01:35 AM                       
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Where exactly did you go in North Africa, Rockessence? And when you went to England, did you stop and see Stonehenge..?
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« Reply #59 on: November 20, 2008, 03:21:04 pm »

rockessence

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   posted 07-26-2006 10:21 AM                       
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Jenni,Devlin,

RE: "The cartoonist signed his name with a star, like the star of David or something? Was he Jewish and that was the reason he was going off to the camps?"

No he was not Jewish. He signed with a little 5-point star...apparently his cartoons had been so scathing for years, the Nazis couldn't wait to get their hands on him.

I have never met Boreas in person or on the phone. Only communicated thru Email. I would dearly love to go and meet him and Ior Bock and Leo Nygren and also the fellow in Germany who keeps the bocksaga.de site. Mr. Nygren has written a lot of material from speaking with Ior Bock and it is on the site. I have spoken to him on the phone and he offered to give a tour to all the important places relating to the Bock material. That sounded really great.

Devlin,

I went to Morocco for almost a month. I had a great time after I recovered from Amoebic Dysentary! In England I had a stunning but fleeting view of Stonehenge from a bus! Whoa Nellie! If I knew then what I know now...blah blah blah.....

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"Illigitimi non carborundum!"
All knowledge is to be used in the manner that will give help and assistance to others, and the desire is that the laws of the Creator be manifested in the physical world. E.Cayce 254-17

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