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Beaker Burials on Thanet Earth

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Desolate Angel
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« on: March 26, 2008, 03:28:29 am »

Beaker Burials on Thanet Earth 

 A Bronze Age ‘Beaker' burial skeleton has been uncovered by archaeologists in east Kent.  The 4,000 year old remains were found in a small grave at the centre of a double ring-ditch, all that remains of an earth barrow at Monkton, Isle of Thanet. Although 'Beaker' burials are rare in this part of the country, similar burials have been found on the Thanet Earth site. However, this latest find is far more elaborate and contains burial goods suggesting it belongs to a person of high status within the community.
 

The body had been buried in a crouched position with a beaker vessel at the feet.  A copper alloy object, possibly a blade or spearhead, was found just beneath the right shoulder and a flat stone wrist guard was found beneath the upper arm.  This wrist guard is believed to have been used to protect an archer's inner wrist against the bow string when releasing an arrow and is a particularly unusual find. Further examination of the bones will confirm the gender of the skeleton, believed to be male, as well as age and any signs of disease.



The Thanet Earth site, which covers the area equivalent to 70 fooball pitches and has a team of more than 30 archaeologists, has also uncovered evidence of Bronze Age 'barrow' cemetries, an Iron Age hut, a Romano-British village and a small Anglo-Saxon cemetry.  Marion Green from the Canterbury Archaeological Trust says: 'The history of the site is now beginning to take shape and it seems that Thanet Earth has a very long farming tradition. The Bronze Age burials are the oldest remains the archaeologists have found so far.'


http://www.archaeology.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1589&Itemid=26
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