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MYTHS OF CRETE & PRE-HELLENIC EUROPE

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Author Topic: MYTHS OF CRETE & PRE-HELLENIC EUROPE  (Read 5319 times)
Skinwalker
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« Reply #810 on: February 27, 2010, 12:33:38 pm »

When Troy VI was set on fire it did not suffer so greatly, being largely built of stone, as did the second city. The houses were, however, overthrown, and the upper portions of the walls demolished. Scarcely an object of any value survived the sack of the wealthy city. The ceramic remains are partly Mycenæan, or Late Minoan III, and partly Trojan.
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« Reply #811 on: February 27, 2010, 12:33:55 pm »

After the fall of Troy the European elements in Anatolia were strengthened. Carian and Lycian pirates infested the seas. There were also settlements of Ægean stock in Cilicia. The Muski-Phrygians, pressing eastward from central Anatolia, appear to have contributed to the overthrow of the tottering empire of the Hittites. In Palestine the Philistines gradually extended their area of control, moving steadily southward, as the Empire of Egypt shrank by slow degrees.
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« Reply #812 on: February 27, 2010, 12:34:11 pm »

The Achæans of Greece met in time the same fate as their predecessors of the Late Mycenæan Period, the Pelopid Dynasty. About two generations after the Trojan war the Dorians, who had been gradually filtering south

p. 336
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« Reply #813 on: February 27, 2010, 12:34:26 pm »

ward through Thessaly, gradually achieved ascendancy. In time, assisted by Illyrian allies, they overran the Peloponnese. The dispossessed Achæan aristocracy and followers were forced into the land of the Ionians, which afterwards became known as Achaia. Dorians also found their way to Crete, which, like Rhodes, was eventually conquered.
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« Reply #814 on: February 27, 2010, 12:34:46 pm »

For generations Greece was devastated by inter-tribal wars, and lapsed into a condition of decline. Periodic migrations took place of its merchants and traders and artisans, and these settled in Crete, Sicily, Sardinia, and Italy. Many found refuge in Anatolia, where grew up Ionian Greece along the coastland of Lycia and Caria.
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« Reply #815 on: February 27, 2010, 12:35:19 pm »

"It was in Ægean Ionia", writes Mr. Hall, "that the torch of Greek civilization was kept alight, while the homeland was in a mediæval condition of comparative barbarism; Cyprus, too, helped though she was too far off for her purer Minoan culture to affect the Ægean peoples very greatly. It was in Ionia that the new Greek civilization arose: Ionia, in whom the old Ægean blood and spirit most survived, taught the new Greece, gave her coined money and letters, art and poesy, and her shipmen, forcing the Phœnicians from before them, carried her new culture to what were then deemed the ends of the earth." 1
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« Reply #816 on: February 27, 2010, 12:35:36 pm »

Footnotes

314:1 In this tradition two Semitic rulers, Sharrukin and the later Shargan-Sharri, were confused.

315:1 Genesis, xiv, 1-2.

315:2 Ibid., xiv, 4 et seq.

318:1 That is, non-Greeks.

319:1 Herodotus, I, 173.

321:1 III, 46.

322:1 VIII, 2.

323:1 History of the Peloponnesian War, I, 4, 5 (Richard Crawley's translation).
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« Reply #817 on: February 27, 2010, 12:35:51 pm »

324:1 Breasted's History of Egypt. p. 319.

326:1 The Journal of Egyptian Archæology (January, 1914), pp. 18-19.

327:1 One theory is that Ictis is the Isle of Wight. Some geologists contend that at this period the island was not entirely cut off from the mainland. The Isle of Thanet has also been identified as Ictis. Another theory is that the reference is to St. Michael's Mount on the south coast of Cornwall, which is connected with the mainland at low water by a causeway.

328:1 Herodotus, VII, 170, 171.
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« Reply #818 on: February 27, 2010, 12:36:05 pm »

329:1 The Peloponnesian War, I, 2-8.

329:2 Before 1375 B.C.

330:1 The Dawn of History, p. 215.

330:2 The Peloponnesian War, I, 6-9.

331:1 Ezekiel, xvi, 3.

332:1 Iliad, Book I, 309-15 (Derby's translation).

333:1 Pronounced Moosh'ke. In the Old Testament they are referred to as "the Meshech" (Ezekiel, xxxii).

336:1 The Ancient History of the Near East, p. 79.
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« Reply #819 on: February 27, 2010, 12:37:03 pm »

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