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How to Build a Pyramid

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Author Topic: How to Build a Pyramid  (Read 7190 times)
Catastrophe
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« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2007, 03:39:30 am »

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You didn't bother to read Davidovits' work did you?

Yes, I have read most of it through again today (UK time).

I was looking for the alleged 'hair'. I could not find the circumstances of its alleged finding. How was it found if it was in the stone? Was the stone cut or pulverized?


Since you have experience in making concrete please tell me if you add the aggregate to the slurry or make the slurry with the aggregate already added. I cannot see the latter as a possibility.

You have pointed out that the slurry gives smooth surfaces in the mould and to do this it must be of small (tiny) particle size. I understand what you say about aggregate containing fossils.


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Qoais
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« Reply #46 on: April 29, 2007, 03:49:40 am »

The dry ingredients are mixed first - then I add just enough water for the consistency I want.  In the old days, I had to shovel the sand and gravel myself, but with these ready-mix powders, it's much easier.  It used to be that we'd rent a little cement mixer, now I just mix with a shovel in my wheel barrow.  It is much like making a cake, in that you combine enough of the dry incredients to make the volume you intend to pour - as in for me - a wheel barrow full.  Then add just enough water like I said, to make it the consistency needed.

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The Geological Proof




Jumbled fossil shells in a limestone block of the
Great Pyramid. Natural sedimentation at sea
bottom normally leaves them in horizontal layers
In prehistoric times most of present-day Egypt was submerged under the sea. The decomposing remains of marine organisms, shells and skeletons, plants, seaweed and algae, fallen to the bottom of the sea, formed mud that condensed itself into a sedimentary rock we call limestone.

A natural process that lasted thousands of years consolidated and hardened them, forming banks of limestone. The pyramid blocks are made of this limestone, a sedimentary rock formed from skeletons and large fossil shells of marine organisms. These fossil remains are normally found in sedimentary horizontal layers. Yet in the stones of the Great Pyramid Professor Davidovits found them in disarray, jumbled up together quite haphazardly as if they were artificially mixed with some kind of pestle.

Another phenomenon observed in the pyramid stones was the presence of air bubbles, organic fibers, hair, bones and animal teeth, foreign materials never found in natural limestone - which would seem to be further proof that the stones were man-made.


Here's the picture that goes with the above:


http://www.relevant-television.com/arikat/proofs.htm
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 03:58:43 am by Qoais » Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
Catastrophe
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« Reply #47 on: April 29, 2007, 03:55:27 am »

I was asking how a hair was discocered inside a rock?
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #48 on: April 29, 2007, 04:00:41 am »

Have you read Herodotus' description. Some may call him the father if lies but he only repeated what he was told, as he himself stated: Histories Book 2

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123 Such as think the tales told by the Egyptians credible are free to accept them for history. For my own part, I propose to myself throughout my whole work faithfully to record the traditions of the several nations ...
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 04:02:54 am by Catastrophe » Report Spam   Logged
Qoais
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« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2007, 04:07:32 am »

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I was asking how a hair was discocered inside a rock?

Is that the Oxford dictionary spelling for discovered?  Grin

Just teasing.

Did you read the post I posted while you were posting your post? Roll Eyes

I did read what tests Davidovits and others have done on the samples but I can't remember exactly which test showed the hair and bones and animal teeth.

It's my bedtime. 2:00 A.M. 
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

"Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong."
Qoais
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« Reply #50 on: April 29, 2007, 04:09:47 am »

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Have you read Herodotus' description. Some may call him the father if lies but he only repeated what he was told, as he himself stated: Histories Book 2

No.  What did he say about the pyramids?  Not that he'd know for sure if he didn't witness the building.
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An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

Logic rules.

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Catastrophe
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« Reply #51 on: April 29, 2007, 04:11:33 am »

Book Two:

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124 Some (workers) were required to drag blocks of stone down to the Nile from the quarries in the Arabian range of hills; others received the blocks after they had been conveyed in boats across the river, and drew them to the range of hills called the Libyan ...

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125 ... After laying the stones for the base, they raised the remaining stones to their places by means of machines formed of short wooded planks. The first machine raised them from the ground to the top of the first step. On this there was another machine, which received the stone upon its arrival, and conveyed it to the second step, whence a third machine advanced it still higher ...

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Catastrophe
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« Reply #52 on: April 29, 2007, 04:14:15 am »

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It's my bedtime. 2:00 A.M.

Sleep well. It is 10am here.

The chemistry is far from conclusive. Some have found it to be perfectly normal limestone as I linked above.
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #53 on: April 29, 2007, 04:17:00 am »

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What did he say about the pyramids?  Not that he'd know for sure if he didn't witness the building.

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142 Thus far I have spoken on the authority of the Egyptians and their priests. ...

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Catastrophe
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« Reply #54 on: April 29, 2007, 04:31:33 am »

I am the more convinced by Herodotus on this point because:

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The same King (after Mycerinus)desirous of eclipsing all his predecessors upon the throne, left as a monument of his reign a pyramid of brick. It bears an inscription, cut in stone, which runs thus: "Despise me not in comparison with the stone pyramids; for I surpass them all, as much as Zeus surpasses the other gods. A pole was plunged into a lake, and the mud which clave thereto was gathered; and bricks were made of the mud, and so I was formed." ...

Note 267 explains "The use of crude brick was general in Egypt, for dwelling houses, tombs and ordinary buildings, the walls of towns, fortresses, and of the sacred enclosures of temples, and for all purposes where stone was not required ..."

Hence "A great number of peoplewere employed in this extensive manufacture ..." hence its portrayl on Rekhmire's tomb along with other mundane occupations.
 
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #55 on: April 29, 2007, 04:43:01 am »

Did D really say this?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Davidovits

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The humidity inside the pyramids is much higher than would be expected in a desert environment; this is caused by the moisture released into the halls and galleries while the blocks cure

The humidity is due to the number of humans passing through. Any humidity from slurry would be long gone.

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Catastrophe
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« Reply #56 on: April 29, 2007, 04:54:38 am »

Right. I will give you my best guess as to how the GP was constructed.

First you have to know the volume of a pyramid. It is given by the formula:

(area/height)/3. It happens that the large granite monoliths are just less than half way up the GP. Source "Giza: The Truth" p. 179. I will check this.

Since the area half way up is 1/4 base area the volume of the top 'half' (by height) is only 1/8 the total. Thus to get 7/8 of the bulk up there requires a ramp only half the length if all were taken up ramp(s) to the very top. Since the large granite features could not have been poured, a ramp or ramps were used to construct up to half height.

After that the method told to Herodotus was probably used, although I know he was told it was used from the bottom. I do not believe the granite features could have been so elevated.
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #57 on: April 29, 2007, 05:13:12 am »

Have you read what "Giza: The Truth" has to say about D's theory.

G:TT page 183:

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... there are three fundamental objections to this analysis. First, as far as we are aware, Davidovits is not suggesting that the granite blocks could have been cast, and consequently - at least as far as the Great Pyramid is concerned - he must be of the opinion that these blocks were pre-prepared and raised in the centrefrom the ground up as each course progressed, using either machines or small temporary ramps (if this were not the case he would have to revert to the full-ramp hypothesis, which would invalidate his whole argument). However, we will see later that we are not convinced that this would be logistically feasible.

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Second, the mere fact that the limestone blocks do not appear to have any uniform shape, especially in the core but also in the casing, would tend to argue against a casting theory - unless each block had its own wooden mould that was not built to any uniform pattern - which in our view would make no sense. Besides, there are too many anomalous shapes on the core blocks that would not be compatible with the use of moulds.

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And, third, why would some of the limestone core blocks have quarry marks on them if they were cast in situ?

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All in all this cannot be considered a serious threat to the spiral ramps theory

I know you will claim the blocks are more uniform so I will do some digging (factually).
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #58 on: April 29, 2007, 05:32:58 am »

I asserted previously that the GP is not made uniformly of blocks (except of course for chambers etc.) and you, as is your prerogative, disagreed.

I can now cite my source:

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It is also clear that the quality of the core masonry varied from edifice to edifice, and even within the same one. Staying with the Great Pyramid, we have already seen that Vyse encountered wide, sand-filled spaces between the core blocks underneath the entrance to the Queen's Chamber. This would suggest they were quite irregularly laid.

He records Perring on this issue as follows:
(Vyse "Operations", Vol. 1, page 6, Note 7.)

Quote
Mr Perring observed, that the mortar used for the casing and lining of the passages was of lime only; that in the body of the pyramid it was composed of red brick, gravel, Nile earth, crushed granite, and calcareous stone, and of lime; and that for fillings in desert sand was employed in a grout of liquid mortar.

It is also stated that "the quality of their core masonry was excellent in placesthat mattered."
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Catastrophe
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« Reply #59 on: April 29, 2007, 05:54:49 am »

I have checked and the height of the actual Kings Chamber (according to my sources) is much less than half way up, although the relieving chambers go quite a bit further up. If so, it would mean that a shorter ramp (perhaps 1/3 that suggested to reach to the top). The relieving chambers could then be built using short internal ramps and building completed around them.

Note that the presence of fill rather than 'solid block' construction would greatly cut down the work in one of the most critical areas; namely cutting the blocks.

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