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Can a Continent Sink?

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Author Topic: Can a Continent Sink?  (Read 4149 times)
Mario Dantas
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« Reply #45 on: September 02, 2009, 06:16:29 pm »

Dear Adam, and Horus,

An excellent work, thanks for sharing!

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Suffice it to say that Keith believed that the essence of his proposed global model “is that oceanic crust is a principal reservoir and that selective recycling of its components is a counter to weathering and riverine [sediment] transport from continent to ocean, and a key process in the self-regulating Earth system” (p. 282). He has little to say about the forces that drove the Mesozoic mantle surge, other than to say that there is a strong possibility that it may have been triggered by a cluster of meteorite impacts in the western equatorial Pacific. These impacts may have reactivated lower mantle, during a surge-promoted change from layered to whole-mantle convection. Deep “roll-margin” mantle recycling associated with the proposed impact-triggered change from layered to whole-mantle convection, and resultant mantle surge is deduced to have formed a range of mixtures that apparently constituted a source of Cretaceous basaltic magma and oceanic crust.

Science is looking at things partially... there should be a reason for things in the Atlantic to happen the way they did. Since they got stuck with the mantle flow justification, no great advance was made because it was  not the flow of the mantle that sank Atlantis nor is it the reason for Plate Tectonics to occur.

Since there was life on Earth, there were no greater planetary revolution, than the Atlantis proposed sinking. Forget about Dinosaurs extinction or ancient meteors, the same event we search and cherish as the real cradle of Mankind was the most utterly transforming Tectonic procedure since Pangea breakup... it changed the face of the world and the only way to know this is to equate globally what happened. A change can be no longer a change but an entirely new entity, as in the case of Atlantis sink, which became a transfigured byproduct of the literal Tectonic chaos when such profound transformation ceased. It became invisible for too many reasons to be noticed...

Everywhere in the Planet witnessed these changes in Continental Geo-positioning and the hardening of the young Oceanic crust as Ice cooled things down. The 140m Sea level rise could have been a worse remedy than the disease, if the hole crust was to be completely submerged by water... The whole Planetary equilibrium was restored and not only Nature started imitating the previous equilibrium that existed with the previous animal and plants livestok that survived, adapting to new conditions and so on, but also completing or fulfilling the crust integrity, leaving the signals of the Pacific ring of fire as witness of a faulty wiped out crust? A clear Continental dislocation in the Atlantic MAR? or a Severe breach of the Black  and Aegean Seas? As someone once told me, like sugar in a tupperware...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Black_Sea_map.png

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Strabo (7.3.6) thinks that the Black Sea was called "inhospitable" before Greek colonization because it was difficult to navigate, and because its shores were inhabited by savage tribes. The name was changed to "hospitable" after the Milesians had colonized southern shoreline, the Pontus, making it part of Greek civilization.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sea

As a matter of fact all Seas must have become inhospitable when Atlantis sank, the healing took time and certainly brought much misery to those living beings caught in the turmoil...


Can Lands Sink and Rise?


not with the size of Atlantis...

but was there, at the time, any larger island than the Island of Atlantis? Is there, at present, any sufficiently large Island in the Atlantic Ocean? Is there any other larger island in the world or even close to it? Is it presently sunk under water? not salt water... or are its neighbor islands (if any) also large? perhaps the largest in the world? Are they close enough?

regards,
Mario Dantas
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