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Clinton, Obama spar in 20th Debate

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Monique Faulkner
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« on: February 27, 2008, 11:01:32 am »

Clinton, Obama spar over healthcare
Posted: 09:12 PM ET
 

Clinton and Obama opened the debate with a sharp exchange on healthcare.
(CNN) — Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama continued their ongoing spat over healthcare at Tuesday's Democratic debate, each accusing the other of distorting their respective policy stands.

"Sen. Obama has consistently said I would force people to have health care whether they can afford it or not," Clinton said.

Obama quickly countered, taking Clinton to task for consistently claiming Obama's plan would exclude 15 million Americans.

"I dispute it and I think it is inaccurate," he said. To suggest somehow that our mailing is somehow different from the kinds of approaches that Senator Clinton has taken throughout this campaign I think is simply not accurate."

The back-and-forth was part of an 16-minute opening discussion on the issue, despite repeated attempts from the debate moderators to move to other topics. It followed a sharp exchange last the weekend over campaign literature the Obama campaign is distributing that claims Clinton would force even those who are not financially able to buy health care.

"I think it's important that you stand up for yourself and you point out these differences so that voters can have the information they need to make a decision," Clinton said of her sharp denouncement of Obama Saturday.

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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2008, 11:02:09 am »

Clinton: I always get the first question
Posted: 09:30 PM ET



 
Clinton and Obama squared off Tuesday night.
(CNN) — Hillary Clinton appeared to suggest Barack Obama has consistently received favorable treatment at recent Democratic debates, saying Tuesday night she is often the first one to field questions from the debate moderators.

"Can I just point out in the last several debates, I seem to get the first question all the time?" Clint said during the second question of Tuesday's debate. "And I don't mind, I'll be happy to field them. I just find it curious that I keep getting the first question on all the issues."

Referencing a recent Saturday Night Live skit that portrayed the press as overwhelmingly in favor of Obama, Clinton also joked, "Maybe we should ask Barack if he's comfortable and needs another pillow.”

Clinton's comments echoed those of her communications director, Howard Wolfson, who on Tuesday sharply criticized the press coverage of the Democratic race.

“I think it is true that every time the Obama campaign in this campaign has attacked Sen. Clinton in the worst kind of personal ways, attacked her veracity, attacked her credibility, said that she would say or do anything to get elected, the press has largely applauded him," he said.

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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2008, 11:02:48 am »

Clinton suggests she may release tax returns
Posted: 10:29 PM ET


 
Clinton indicated she may release her tax returns before the end of the primary season.
(CNN) – Hillary Clinton suggested Tuesday she may release her tax returns before the Democratic primary race is over, a seeming reversal over her long-standing position that she would not release the documents unless she is the party's nominee.

"I will do it as others have done it upon becoming the nominee or even earlier," Clinton said at Tuesday's debate.

Pressed if she would do it before the March 4 primaries, Clinton said she didn't have the time to get them together, but said, "I will certainly work toward releasing them, and we will get that done and in the public domain."

Obama released his tax returns late last year, and suggested Clinton do the same. He stepped up his criticism of the New York senator for not doing so earlier this month when it was revealed she loaned her campaign $5 million.

"I think the American people deserve to know where you get your income from," Obama said then.

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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2008, 11:04:46 am »

Clinton, Obama clash over campaign tactics in debate
Story Highlights
Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton square off in Cleveland, Ohio, debate

Clinton takes Obama to task over health care, NAFTA fliers

Obama says fliers are accurate and that his campaign hasn't "whined" about attacks

Clinton denies knowledge of Obama photo leaked on Internet

Next Article in Politics »


 Read  VIDEO
     
CLEVELAND, Ohio (CNN) -- Democrats Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama sparred with each other over negative campaigning, health care and free trade Tuesday, a week before key primaries in Texas and Ohio.




Sens. Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama faced off Tuesday in the final debate before the March 4 primaries.

 Those contests are must-wins for Clinton if she is to continue to contest Obama for the nomination, as even former President Clinton suggests.

Debating at Cleveland State University, Clinton repeated angry claims from the campaign trail that Obama mischaracterized her stances on health care and NAFTA in political material mailed to voters in Ohio.

"I have a great deal of respect for Sen. Obama, but we have differences," she said. "In the last several days, some of those differences in tactics and choices that Sen. Obama's campaign has made regarding fliers and mailers and other information that has been put out ... have been very disturbing to me."

The mailers, which Obama defends, claim that Clinton's health care plan would force people who don't want insurance to buy it. They also say she has been inconsistent on NAFTA, which many in industrial states like Ohio blame for shipping blue-collar jobs overseas.  Watch the candidates' exchange over health care »

Clinton said her health plan would cover everyone and would be affordable to everyone.

While she has made multiple statements saying NAFTA has helped the economy in some parts of the United States, Clinton said she has always maintained that it needs to be improved to provide better labor and environmental protections in Mexico and Canada. If that happened, she said, fewer American jobs would go overseas.

She blasted the health care mailing in particular, saying it's "almost as if the health insurance companies and the Republicans wrote it."  Watch analysts break down the debate performances »

Obama said the mailings are common practice in political campaigns and raise valid differences between his stances and Clinton's. He said he, too, has been targeted by negative Clinton advertisements.

"Sen. Clinton has consistently sent out negative attacks on us," he said. "We haven't whined about it because I understand that's the nature of these campaigns.

"But to suggest that our mailer is somehow different to the kind of approach Sen Clinton has taken throughout this campaign certainly is not accurate."

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With Obama having won 11 statewide contests in a row and a recent set of national polling suggesting he has the support of 50 percent of Democrats to her 40 percent, Clinton has sharpened her attacks on Obama in the past week.

According to CNN estimates, Obama leads Clinton in the delegate race, 1,360 to 1,269. In all, 2,025 delegates are needed to seal the Democratic nomination.

Even Clinton's husband, former President Bill Clinton, has suggested that if she does not win in Ohio and Texas, her campaign will face a dramatically difficult challenge keeping up with the surging Obama. Rhode Island and Vermont also hold primaries on March 4.

Clinton denied knowledge of a photograph of Obama wearing Somali tribal garb that was provided to the Drudge Report Web site Monday. Matt Drudge wrote that the photo was leaked to him by the Clinton campaign in what Obama called an effort to reinforce false notions that he is either foreign-born or a Muslim.

The picture was taken during a 2006 visit to Africa by the senator. It is common for political leaders to be given gifts and asked to wear traditional garb on such trips.

Clinton denied any knowledge of the photo coming from one of her staff.

"So far as I know, it did not," she said. "That's not the kind of behavior that I condone or expect from the people working in my campaign."

Obama, a senator from Illinois, said he believes her.

"I take Sen. Clinton at her word that she knows nothing about the photo," he said.

As in many of their debates, health care was a prime focus, with the first 16 minutes of the debate devoted to it. The two staked out familiar themes -- Clinton saying her plan would guarantee health coverage for all Americans and Obama touting a plan he says would make it affordable for everyone but not require them to buy it if they don't want it.


Responding to a question on NAFTA in which moderator Tim Russert listed comments he said show Clinton once supported the free-trade agreement, the New York senator appeared to lash out at media bias against her -- a claim members of her campaign have made repeatedly -- and in favor of Obama.

"I just find it kind of curious that I keep getting the first question on all of these issues," she said before adding, in reference to a "Saturday Night Live" skit, "Maybe we should ask Barack if he's comfortable and needs another pillow." E-mail to a friend

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/02/26/dems.debate/index.html
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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2008, 11:05:35 am »

Clinton hits Obama over Farrakhan
Posted: 09:08 AM ET


 
Clinton criticized Obama for not outright rejecting Farrakhan's support.
(CNN) — Hillary Clinton criticized Barack Obama at Tuesday night's debate for not directly rejecting the support of Louis Farrakhan.

“There's a difference between denouncing and rejecting," Clinton said. "And I think when it comes to this sort of, you know, inflammatory — I have no doubt that everything that Barack just said is absolutely sincere. But I just think, we've got to be even stronger. We cannot let anyone in any way say these things because of the implications that they have, which can be so far reaching.”

Farrakhan, the head of the Nation of Islam, recently made positive statements about Obama’s candidacy. The controversial leader has made many remarks that have been deemed anti-Semitic, including calling Judaism a "gutter religion." Asked tonight if he accepted Farrakhan's endorsement, Obama denounced those statements.

"I obviously can't censor him, but it is not support that I sought," Obama said. "And we're not doing anything, I assure you, formally or informally with Minister Farrakhan."

Pressed if he specifically rejected the endorsement, Obama said, "I can't say to somebody that he can't say that he thinks I'm a good guy" and that he didn't "see a difference between 'denouncing' and 'rejecting.'"

Responding later in the exchange directly to Clinton's comments, Obama said, "There's no formal offer of help from Minister Farrakhan that would involve me rejecting it."

"But if the word 'reject' Senator Clinton feels is stronger than the word 'denounce,' then I'm happy to concede the point, and I would reject and denounce," he added.

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Monique Faulkner
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2008, 11:06:19 am »

Ohio's Sherrod Brown satisfied with NAFTA answers
Posted: 08:23 AM ET
CLEVELAND, Ohio (CNN) — Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, an avowed economic progressive who also happens to be an uncommitted superdelegate from a very important state, said he was pleased with both candidate's answers on NAFTA during Tuesday's debate.

Both Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama were asked if, as president, they would opt out of NAFTA in six months. Both candidates said they supported restructuring NAFTA and would use the threat of opting out of the agreement as a negotiating tool.

"They said it exactly right," Brown told CNN. "I want trade and more of it. I want it under different rules."

Brown voiced loud opposition to NAFTA during his 2006 Senate campaign, in which he unseated GOP incumbent Mike DeWine.

"If we say we want a different NAFTA," Brown continued, "they will negotiate, always with the threat of opting out if they don't, and that's exactly the right position. And I was thrilled, because I have not heard either of them specifically say that and they answered the question directly."

Brown said he is not planning to endorse either Democratic candidate.
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Volitzer
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« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2008, 03:56:58 am »

Good for him.

All CFR shamdidates are pro-NAFTA.  The Bilderbergs have to destroy America's  economy first before they bring in the NAU.

Let's insource our money productions back to America where the Constitution says it belongs and get rid of the European owned Federal-Reserve.

Vote Ron Paul.

http://knowbeforeyouvote.com
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2008, 05:42:14 am »

I'm wondering if it's possible to have too many debates.  These two candidates seem to cover the same issues each time and end up with the same answers.  This last debate they spent the first sixteen minutes on health care, but independent experts agree that their two plans are essentially the same.

Ironically, Hillary had been accusing Barack of not wanting to debate, but has suffered more in the outcomes.  She ends up looking more and more bipolar as we are exposed to her continually changing approaches and personalities.   On the other hand, Barack remains consistent, calm and presidential.
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Jeremy Dokken
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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2008, 10:50:55 am »

I think I saw most of the debates.  I remember how, early on, all the pundits would keep saying how she "won" after each of the early ones, no matter what happened on the floor - sometimes Barack won, sometimes Edwards, sometimes Kucinich.  I've never seen what they are talking about. I think the media thinks everyone is stupid and has always tried to prop her up to make her the nominee - especially the right wing pundits.
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2008, 12:40:41 pm »

HI Jeremy,

I don't really blame the media.  Last year Hillary really did look like the obvious front runner.  I supported her because I didn't think Democrats had anyone else that was electable.  However, beginning in 2008, Democrats began to see a darker side of the Clintons, and many of them, including me, didn't like what they saw.  In the meantime Obama began to emerge as the more worthy candidate.  In speeches, debates and interviews people got to know him as a real person with great potential instead of dismissing him as that young upstart with the weird name.  They also got to know his lovely and gracious wife and realized that she could hold her own as well.
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Jeremy Dokken
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« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2008, 01:11:18 pm »

I would have supported her if she was the nominee, but I don't like her dirty tactics and I also don't like the whining she has done when things haven't gone her way.  Win at any cost, is that what the Clintons are all about?

I also don't like the "bandwagon" effect of the media.  Hillary can complain about it all she wants, but if Barack had lost 11 in a row, the media would have clamoured for him to leave.  Why does she get such preferential treatment?
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2008, 01:19:59 pm »

Well, you've got a good point.  Can you imagine Barack whining the way Hillary has done?  The press would have been all over him!  I guess our culture feels it's okay for a woman to whine and get away with it, but I think people take that into account when they go to vote, too.
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Volitzer
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« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2008, 02:06:00 pm »

I would have supported her if she was the nominee, but I don't like her dirty tactics and I also don't like the whining she has done when things haven't gone her way.  Win at any cost, is that what the Clintons are all about?

I also don't like the "bandwagon" effect of the media.  Hillary can complain about it all she wants, but if Barack had lost 11 in a row, the media would have clamoured for him to leave.  Why does she get such preferential treatment?

Because the Billderbergers annointed her that's why.  How dare Obama deviate from the script.  What the hell does he think America is a Republic ??  How dare he ?   Shocked
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