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Taino Indians Still Thrive in Cuba

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Author Topic: Taino Indians Still Thrive in Cuba  (Read 21528 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2008, 06:58:10 pm »









Doggies and Indianboy



Archeological discoveries and studies of village sites and burial places indicate that
there existed at least three cultures in Cuba: the Guanahatabeyes, the Ciboneyes,
and the Taínos.

The Guanahatabey was Cuba's first culture.

Cuba's second culture were the Ciboney.

The Taínos occupied the central and eastern parts of Cuba, as well as most of Hispaniola,
Jamaica, and Puerto Rico.

More info or become a member of Liceo Cubano on this


http://www.liceocubano.com/Eng/Circular/Edicion_IV/Inhabitants.asp
« Last Edit: February 27, 2008, 07:00:27 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #31 on: February 27, 2008, 07:03:38 pm »



http://www.elmuseo.org/taino/







Taino culture was dominant throughout the Caribbean, a sea and island world that
was in turn cradle of Taino civilization.

The original Caribbeans spoke Arawak.

The people of the Arawak language family still comprise one of the more widespread
American Indigenous cultures.

Aspects of the animistic and material culture of the Taino-Arawak have been adopted
by the mestizo populations of the Caribbean.

The naked people Columbus first sighted lived in an island world of rainforests and
tropical weather, and adventure and fishing legends at sea. They could build a dwelling
from a single tree (the Royal Palm) and from several others (gommier, ceiba), a canoe
that could carry more than one hundred people.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2008, 07:10:01 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2008, 10:55:00 am »



BABY'S SKELETON







Baby skeleton





- Qu'emi means Rabbit

- Tanama means Butterfly

- Ita means Don't know

- Macu' means Big Eyes



I can believe my own eyes, I found a dictionary on the internet....when I started this page I knew as much as there is with the first picture (and a little more) but now, almost finished I know more about Taino's then about the Netherlands.....

If you like to speak more Taino see the


http://members.dandy.net/~orocobix/tedict.html
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 10:57:37 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2008, 10:59:25 am »



B/W PICTURES OF EXCAVATIONS







What happend



This picture shows you one by one how the skeletons were digged up. On the right of this
pictures you see Yovani, he was our guide and he was a good one, although i forgot most
of his words. (but they were more like...this is the doctor, this is a hunter, and you are in
a cabin now..)

He was our guide cause he became a friend when an other friend of us meet him in Cuba
the other year
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:01:40 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2008, 11:04:26 am »











GOLD !

Our knowledge of the Taíno comes from several sources.

Sixteenth-century Spanish chronicles provide incomplete but crucial information about

Taíno society. Intensive archaeological excavation of Taíno sites, which began about
1950, has unearthed many types of pottery and artifacts, confirmed Taíno burial customs,
and revealed what their ancient communities looked like.

The Taíno were the dominant culture in Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba,
Jamaica and the Bahamas from about 1200 AD to the arrival of Columbus in 1492.

For more art then there was found on the skelons place you can have a look at this page,
and recover some simular gods !



http://www.elmuseo.org/taino/
TIP !! Its a great page with a lot of info!
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Bianca
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« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2008, 11:06:01 am »









Scary?




Art and Archaeology of Pre-Columbian Cuba
(Pitt Latin American Series)
by Ramon Dacal Moure, Manuel Rivero De La Calle,

Daniel H. Sandweiss
Our Price: $35.00
Availability: On Order; usually ships within 1-2 weeks.
Hardcover (December 1996) Univ of Pittsburgh Pr (Txt);
ISBN: 082293955X

This is the first English-language publication to synthesize Cuban prehistory in over fifty
years, the book covers five millennia of human life in Cuba.

It features the two kinds of prehistoric art found on the island: that of original settlers,
the Ciboneys, and that of the Tainos, who had largely replaced the Ciboneys by the time
of Columbus.

The authors are both professors at Havana University. With forward by Thor Heyerdahl.

FERCO provided support for this publication.




Wanna order this or other books about the Taino Indians, go to this


http://www.iluminated.com/taino.

and learn all about the Tainos.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:08:56 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2008, 11:10:39 am »









Skeletons




Most skeletons are showing coloured signs. Each sign is telling something about what
is found at the person who was burried. On some persons they found gold, clothes,
copper, grain, seeds and amulets.

Its worth going to this cemetery.

You can go to this place with the little train that comes along most of the Hotels.

You will also see the local doctor, the farmer, a school and plenty of local people.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:14:47 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2008, 11:18:17 am »









More of them




This skeletons were found like this, the only thing the people did was digging them up
and show them to the rest of the world. Some other who were found in the neighbour-
hood were taken for research.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:20:05 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2008, 11:21:37 am »









Princess




They think this was the princess of the tribal.

She has the most coloured arrows on her body. Maybe she died giving birth to a child,
cause her body shows this.

On her body they found gold....which maybe comes all the way from Peru or Mexico
(gold isn't something that is found in Cuba).
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:25:15 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2008, 11:26:51 am »









Sleepy??




When we went to Cuba in 1999 we had to pay $1 to see the Indian village and $1 to
see the skeletons. We had to pay $1 to make pictures and again $1 to make a video.......

in 2000 when we went again we had to pay $3 for the Indian village, $5 for the skeletons,
$3 to make pictures and $5 to make a video (and this is per person and if you like to make
pictures on the other side you have to pay again !!!!!!!!!!!!).

So beware of what you pay, do or say you will do.

But its worth seeing all this.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:28:50 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2008, 11:30:05 am »









Map




Arawak (or Taino) Indians inhabiting Cuba when Columbus landed on the island in 1492
died from diseases brought by sailors and settlers.

By 1511, Spaniards under Diego Velásquez had established settlements.

Havana's superb harbor made it a common transit point to and from Spain.

Christopher Columbus, whose name literally means "Christ-bearing colonizer," wrote
in his diary shortly after the landfall that he and his sailors saw "naked men" (there
were also women), whom they found "very healthy-looking."

Landing at Guanahani, in the Bahamas, and sailing on to Cuba and Bohio (Haiti/Santo
Domingo), renamed Española, Columbus soon noted a widespread language and system
of beliefs and lifeways. Conferring with various caciques (chiefs), he heard them call
themselves "Taino." (Tyler 1988)
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:32:42 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #41 on: February 28, 2008, 11:34:39 am »









Village




Taino culture was dominant throughout the Caribbean, a sea and island world that
was in turn cradle of Taino civilization. The original Caribbeans spoke Arawak.

The people of the Arawak language family still comprise one of the more widespread
American Indigenous cultures.

Aspects of the animistic and material culture of the Taino-Arawak have been adopt-
ed by the mestizo populations of the Caribbean.

The naked people Columbus first sighted lived in an island world of rainforests and
tropical weather, and adventure and fishing legends at sea.

They could build a dwelling from a single tree (the Royal Palm) and from several
others (gommier, ceiba), a canoe that could carry more than one hundred people.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:36:33 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2008, 11:37:58 am »









The River




The houses (bohios) were (and are today among Dominican and Cuban Cuajiros) made
of palm tree, trunk and thatch lashed together in a rectangle or sometimes a circle pattern.

The wood of the Royal Palm is still today considered the most resistant to tropical rot,
lasting untreated as long as ninety years.

The Tainos lived in the shadows of a diverse forest.

We know that their world would appear to us, as it did to the Spanish of the fifteenth
century, as a tropical paradise.

It was not heaven on earth, but it was one of those places that was reasonably close.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:39:59 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #43 on: February 28, 2008, 11:42:46 am »









Dance




The people lived in small, clean villages of neatly appointed thatch dwellings along rivers
inland and on the coasts. They were a handsome people who had no need of clothing for
warmth.

They liked to bathe often.

They painted their bodies with earth dyes and adorned themselves with shells and metals.

Men and women chiefs often wore gold in the ears and nose, or as pendants around the neck.
Some had tattoos.


From all early descriptions the Tainos were a healthy people who showed no signs of distress
from hunger or want. The Tainos, whose color was olive-brown to copper, reminded Columbus
of the people of the Canary Islands.

In parts of Cuba and Santo Domingo, some of the caciques, village or clan and nation chiefs,
wore a type of tunic on ceremonial occasions, but they saw no apparent need to cover their
breasts or genitals and they were totally natural about it.

The Taino had plenty of cotton, which they wove into mats, hammocks and small sails and numerous "bejucos" or fiber ropes.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:45:59 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #44 on: February 28, 2008, 11:48:00 am »









Music




The Taino islands provided a vast array of edible fruits.

The Arawaks made specific use of many types of trees and plants from an estimated
floral and faunal range of 5,800 species. Further upriver in the villages, they saw large
fields of corn, yucca, beans and fruit orchards covering whole valleys.

The Taino were a sea-going people and took pride in their courage on the high ocean
as well as their skill in finding their way around their world. They visited one another
constantly.

Columbus was often astonished at finding lone Indian fishermen sailing in the open ocean
as he made his way among the islands.



More good information can be found on this page


http://www.hcc-online.com/floridahistory/history/indian.htm
« Last Edit: February 28, 2008, 11:51:29 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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