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Easter Island - Virtual Tour

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Moabite God
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« on: February 03, 2008, 08:47:14 pm »



Despite being such a tiny island, Easter has a wealth of beauty both man made and natural. The links above will take you to some of the key sights on the island. So important that the United Nations made it a World Heritage site, Easter Islands ruins are still very accessible. So far there are no fences or signs telling you to stay our or watch where you walk. Perhaps this is because it seems everywhere you walk is an archeological site! One big open air museum! Enjoy.

http://mysteriousplaces.com/Easter_Island/html/sites.html
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Moabite God
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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2008, 08:50:59 pm »

« Last Edit: February 03, 2008, 08:53:14 pm by Moabite God » Report Spam   Logged
Moabite God
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2008, 08:55:21 pm »

Anakena Beach



This is the most Polynesian-looking part of the island, a true paradise with a grove of coconut palms that stretches to a white sand beach and a calm blue cove of warm Pacific waters. Anakena is one of two sand beaches on an island that is otherwise surrounded by a rough, black rock coastline. The idyllic setting here is interrupted by an ahu with six moai, a stark reminder that you are still on Easter Island. The distinct features of the moai, with carvings on their backs, are accented by the red scoria top knots, or pukaos, on their heads. This is where the island's first settlers, Hotu Matu'a and his family, are believed to have landed.
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Moabite God
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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2008, 08:57:14 pm »

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Moabite God
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2008, 08:59:55 pm »

Paro



It is difficult to imagine how the islanders moved such a large statue from the quarry four miles (six kilometers) away; Paro is the island's largest transported moai. Lying face down, toppled from its ahu, Paro weighs 82 tons and is 32.45 feet (9.89 meters) long. Some theorists estimate it could have taken four to five hundred people to move Paro. Paro's pukao alone is almost six feet (two meters) across, 5.5 feet (1.7 meters) high, and weighs 11.5 tons.

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Moabite God
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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2008, 09:02:37 pm »

Orongo

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Moabite God
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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2008, 09:07:39 pm »

Hanga Roa



Hanga Roa is the only town on Easter Island. Most of the 2,000 Rapanui people that live on the island reside here, where Easter Island's only port is located.

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Moabite God
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« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2008, 09:09:53 pm »


Rano Raraku



The main quarry for Easter Island's statues, this volcanic crater is a virtual moai graveyard. The stone-faced giants lie in various states of production. Some are half carved, many are broken, and many seem to have been abandoned in mid-transport. Most remarkably, at the base of the quarry, moai stand half buried in the slope -- up to their chins and noses -- from years of erosion. To some observers the quarry looks like a graveyard of stone giants. It's as if the production of moai was abruptly abandoned, leaving us a frozen snapshot in time so we can look closely at exactly how the moai were carved out of the available rock. This quarry and the nearby transport road is the staging area on which many speculators base their theories on how the moai were transported. Archaeologist Jo Anne Van Tilburg suggests that the moai production in Rano Raraku quarry probably started and stopped often over the years, possibly due to periodic resource shortages or to political disagreements.

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« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2008, 09:11:18 pm »

Terevaka


The highest point on the island, Terevaka lies 500 meters above sea level. It is the youngest of all the volcanoes on the island, dated at 240,000 years old, compared to the volcano at Rano Kau, near Orongo, which is about one million years old. There are some 70 volcanic centers on Easter Island.

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Moabite God
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« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2008, 09:13:07 pm »

Ahu Akivi



Ahu Akivi is situated nine miles (15 kilometers) from the quarry. It has been estimated that the moai at this site were probably transported and erected after AD 1400. The replica moai was created from photogrammetric data collected on one statue at Ahu Akivi by Jo Anne Van Tilburg, but is actually represents the statistically average shape, height and weight of 134 statues found intact outside of the quarry where they were carved. Ahu Akivi is an unusual site because it is inland. Although many visitors assume the statues were placed here to face the ocean, in fact they were meant to look out over a very large village which today is in ruins. The site was restored in 1960 by the American archaeologist William Mulloy. During the restoration, it took a full month -- using a stone ramp and two wooden levers -- to raise the first of the seven moai. By the time they got to the last moai, the same task took them less than a week.

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« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2008, 09:14:32 pm »

Ahu Tahai



Situated near the town of Hanga Roa, the ahu at Tahai sits near a canoe ramp made of rounded beach stones, and was restored by the American archaeologist William Mulloy. Tahai is thought to be among the earliest ahu structures on the island, dating back to AD 690.
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« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2008, 09:16:04 pm »

Ahu Tongariki



In 1960, an earthquake in Chile triggered a tidal wave, which hit the coast of Easter Island at Tongariki. The tidal wave sent the 15 Tongariki moai—some of which weigh 30 tons—several hundred feet inland. The ahu, the largest on Easter Island, was effectively destroyed. It wasn't until 1992 that the site was restored, under the direction of Chilean archaeologist, Claudio Cristino. The task took five years.


 
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Moabite God
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« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2008, 09:17:12 pm »

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« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2008, 09:19:49 pm »

Ahu Vinapu



If size signified importance, Ahu Vinapu was one of the most important ahu on Easter Island. The precisely fitted large basalt cut slabs have perplexed some archaeologists, in particular Thor Heyerdahl. He points to this Inca-like stone ahu as a key indicator to a distinct Peruvian influence on the island. Few experts disagree that the stonework here is more advanced than that of other ahu on the island. Was this the result of an Inca influence on the island, or was it due to years of experience attained by Rapanui stoneworkers? An average slab here is eight by 5.5 feet (2.5 x 1.7meters) and weighs seven tons.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/easter/
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Moabite God
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« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2008, 09:22:49 pm »




This is the story of a team of archaeologists and a 75-person crew who sought to unravel a central mystery of Easter Island: how hundreds of giant stone statues that dominate the island's coast were moved and erected. For one month, the team struggled to raise a 10-ton moai, using only the tools and materials available to the ancient Easter Islanders.

Photo: © Cliff Wassmann

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/easter/
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