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Finnish Paganism

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« Reply #15 on: March 30, 2007, 11:13:02 pm »

Ilmarinen

Seppo Ilmarinen, the Eternal Hammerer, blacksmith and inventor in the Kalevala, is an archetypal artificer from Finnish mythology. ("Seppo" is a popular boy's name and the Finnish word for blacksmith "seppä" is derived from it, or vice versa.) Immortal, he is capable of creating practically anything, but is notoriously unlucky in love. He is described as working the known metals of the time, including brass, copper, iron, gold and silver. The great works of Ilmarinen include the crafting of the dome of the sky and the forging of the Sampo.

The Forging of the Sampo

When the old sage, Väinämöinen, was traveling wide in the search of a wife, he was captured by the old mistress of Pohjola, the land of the North. In return for giving him safe passage from the land of Pohjola back to his native country, the enchantress Louhi of Pohjola wanted to have made the Sampo, a magic artifact. Väinämöinen replied that he could not make her one, but that Ilmarinen could, and promised to send the great smith to Pohjola to do just that. In return for this wondrous device, Louhi would also give Ilmarinen her daughter's hand in marriage.

On having returned home, Väinämöinen tries to awe Ilmarinen with tales of the maiden's beauty and so lure him to Pohjola. Ilmarinen sees through the ruse, however, and refuses. Not to be outdone, Väinämöinen tricks the smith into climbing a fir tree trying to bring down moonlight that is glimmering on the branches. Conjuring a storm-wind with his magical song, Väinämöinen then blows Ilmarinen away to Pohjola.

Once there, Ilmarinen is approached by the toothless hag, Louhi, and her daughter, the Maiden of Pohjola, and having seen the maiden's beauty, consents to build a Sampo. For three days, he sought a place to build a great forge. In that forge he placed metals and started working, tending the magic fire with help of the slaves of Pohjola.

On the first day, Ilmarinen looked down into the flames and saw that the metal had taken the form of a crossbow with a golden arch, a copper shaft and quarrel-tips of silver. But the bow had an evil spirit, asking for a new victim each day, and so Ilmarinen broke it and cast the pieces back into the fire.

On the second day, there came a metal ship from the fire, with ribs of gold and copper oars. Though beautiful to behold, it too was evil at heart, being too eager to rush towards battle, and so, Ilmarinen broke the magic boat apart and cast back the pieces once more.

On the third day, a metal cow emerged, with golden horns and the sun and the stars on its brow. But alas, it was ill-tempered, and so the magical heifer was broken into pieces and melted down.

On the fourth day, a golden plow is pulled from the forge, with a golden plowshare, a copper beam and silver handles. But it too is flawed, plowing up planted fields and furrowing meadows. In despair, Ilmarinen destroys his creation once more.

Angered at his lack of success, Ilmarinen conjures the four winds to fan the flames. The winds blow for three days, until finally, the Sampo is born, taking the shape of a magic mill that produces grain, salt and gold. Pleased with his creation at last, Ilmarinen presents it to Louhi, who promptly locks it in a vault deep underground.

Returning triumphant to the Maiden of Pohjola, Ilmarinen bids her to become his wife. To his dismay, she refuses to leave her native land, forcing him to return home alone and dejected.


Ilmarinen's Bride of Gold

After the loss of his first wife, the disheartened Ilmarinen attempts to craft a new one from gold and silver, but finds the golden wife hard and cold. Dismayed, he attempts to wed her to his brother Väinämöinen instead, but the old sage rejects her, saying that the golden wife ought to be cast back into the furnace and tells Ilmarinen to "forge from her a thousand trinkets". Speaking to all of his people, he further adds:

"Every child of Northland, listen,
Whether poor, or fortune-favored:
Never bow before an image
Born of molten gold and silver:
Never while the sunlight brightens,
Never while the moonlight glimmers,
Choose a maiden of the metals,
Choose a bride from gold created
Cold the lips of golden maiden,
Silver breathes the breath of sorrow."



The tale of the Golden Wife can be seen as a cautionary tale based on the theme of "money cannot buy happiness". To a contemporary reader, there is also a similarity to the hubristic nature of the Golem legend, or to Frankenstein, in that even the most skilled of mortals cannot rival divine perfection when creating life.


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« Reply #16 on: March 30, 2007, 11:16:09 pm »

Haltija

Haltija is a spirit and often gnome or elf-like creature in Finnish mythology, that guards, helps or protects something or somebody. The word is possibly derived from Gothic *haltijar, and referred to the original settler of a homestead - although this is not the only possible etymology.

There are lots of different haltijas. Nature has its own haltijas, like haltijas of water and haltijas of forest. Graveyard have its own haltijas, Kalman väki, ("folk of death").
Human settlements have haltijas. One type of them is Tonttu or Maan haltija (Haltija of land). Tonttu is a Finnish version of the Swedish Tomte. Both tonttu and tomte are related to words tontti (Finnish) and tomt (Swedish). They mean a piece of land, on which a house is built, and later protected by a local spirit, a tonttu. Kotihaltija (home elf, home gnome) is the word for a tonttu that lives in every home. He takes care of the house, but it is also important to treat him with respect. Saunatonttu lives in the sauna and protects it, but also makes sure that people will not behave improperly in it. Joulutonttu is Finnish for Christmas elf. Unlike some christmas elves, Finnish Joulutonttu is thought not to have pointy ears.
Even humans have their personal haltijas, which are their protecting spirits like angels in christianity. One of them is Luonto, which means "nature".
In Estonian mythology a similar being is called haldjas.
When written as haltia, the term usually refers to the elves in Tolkien's mythology or other such fantasy works.

Folk and power

Some haltijas are divided in races or folks, which are called väki. There are different kind of väkis of haltijas, like veden väki (water folk) or metsän väki (forest folk). However, väki should not be simply translated to folk or race, because it has also another meaning at the same time; it means folk, and it means (magical) powers. Sometimes väki is more like folk, and then it is a group of individual haltijas. Sometimes väki is more like magical power, and then it is the qualities of certain environments and elements, or powers that can make diseases or cure. Usually the both meanings are true at the same time. Magical powers are caused by groups of haltijas. For example, if someone gets sick while swimming, this can be caused by väki of water that is attached to a person. In this sense väki is more like magical power of water that can make people ill, but it can also mean that very small or invisible haltija-spirits are attached to a person. However, if someone goes fishing, (s)he can ask for väki of water to bring fish by calling individual haltijas belonging that väki by their names. In latter case väki is understood more as a folk, but it can be seen also as (luck bringing) magical force.
Some väkis of haltijas:
•   Väki of forest (metsän väki) means haltijas of forest. Their leader is Tapio, the king of forest. It also means magical powers of forest.
•   Väki of water (veden väki) means haltijas of water. Their leader is Ahti, the king of the sea. Veden väki is also magical power of water that can make people sick or heal them.
•   Väki of woman (naisen väki) is usually understood as special magical powers of women
•   Väki of death (kalman väki) means ghosts and spirits, but also magical power that can be found from graveyard. This power can make people ill, and it can also be used against other people.
•   Väki of fire: (tulen väki) means spirits of fire, but also the destructive forces of fire and healing power of warm air of sauna
•   Väki of mountain (vuoren väki) means usually evil haltijas of hills and big stones
•   Väki of wood (puun väki) means race of haltijas of trees, and also power of wood material, which can cause for example pain if you are hit by wooden object
•   Väki of iron (raudan väki) means haltijas of iron, that can hurt people which are hit by bladed weapons. Väki of steel can also be commanded to heal the wounds they have done.
Haltija väkis of different environments and materials were thought to be in conflicts with each other. For example, when wood is burned, it is an assault in which väki of fire is beating väki of wood. Väki of fire can be used to scare other väki away. For example, if you were made ill by väki of water, that has attached you while you were swimming, this väki and the illness could be removed in sauna that had a lots of väki of fire.
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« Reply #17 on: March 30, 2007, 11:17:07 pm »

Haltija

Haltija is a spirit and often gnome or elf-like creature in Finnish mythology, that guards, helps or protects something or somebody. The word is possibly derived from Gothic *haltijar, and referred to the original settler of a homestead - although this is not the only possible etymology.

There are lots of different haltijas. Nature has its own haltijas, like haltijas of water and haltijas of forest. Graveyard have its own haltijas, Kalman väki, ("folk of death").
Human settlements have haltijas. One type of them is Tonttu or Maan haltija (Haltija of land). Tonttu is a Finnish version of the Swedish Tomte. Both tonttu and tomte are related to words tontti (Finnish) and tomt (Swedish). They mean a piece of land, on which a house is built, and later protected by a local spirit, a tonttu. Kotihaltija (home elf, home gnome) is the word for a tonttu that lives in every home. He takes care of the house, but it is also important to treat him with respect. Saunatonttu lives in the sauna and protects it, but also makes sure that people will not behave improperly in it. Joulutonttu is Finnish for Christmas elf. Unlike some christmas elves, Finnish Joulutonttu is thought not to have pointy ears.
Even humans have their personal haltijas, which are their protecting spirits like angels in christianity. One of them is Luonto, which means "nature".
In Estonian mythology a similar being is called haldjas.
When written as haltia, the term usually refers to the elves in Tolkien's mythology or other such fantasy works.

Folk and power

Some haltijas are divided in races or folks, which are called väki. There are different kind of väkis of haltijas, like veden väki (water folk) or metsän väki (forest folk). However, väki should not be simply translated to folk or race, because it has also another meaning at the same time; it means folk, and it means (magical) powers. Sometimes väki is more like folk, and then it is a group of individual haltijas. Sometimes väki is more like magical power, and then it is the qualities of certain environments and elements, or powers that can make diseases or cure. Usually the both meanings are true at the same time. Magical powers are caused by groups of haltijas. For example, if someone gets sick while swimming, this can be caused by väki of water that is attached to a person. In this sense väki is more like magical power of water that can make people ill, but it can also mean that very small or invisible haltija-spirits are attached to a person. However, if someone goes fishing, (s)he can ask for väki of water to bring fish by calling individual haltijas belonging that väki by their names. In latter case väki is understood more as a folk, but it can be seen also as (luck bringing) magical force.
Some väkis of haltijas:
•   Väki of forest (metsän väki) means haltijas of forest. Their leader is Tapio, the king of forest. It also means magical powers of forest.
•   Väki of water (veden väki) means haltijas of water. Their leader is Ahti, the king of the sea. Veden väki is also magical power of water that can make people sick or heal them.
•   Väki of woman (naisen väki) is usually understood as special magical powers of women
•   Väki of death (kalman väki) means ghosts and spirits, but also magical power that can be found from graveyard. This power can make people ill, and it can also be used against other people.
•   Väki of fire: (tulen väki) means spirits of fire, but also the destructive forces of fire and healing power of warm air of sauna
•   Väki of mountain (vuoren väki) means usually evil haltijas of hills and big stones
•   Väki of wood (puun väki) means race of haltijas of trees, and also power of wood material, which can cause for example pain if you are hit by wooden object
•   Väki of iron (raudan väki) means haltijas of iron, that can hurt people which are hit by bladed weapons. Väki of steel can also be commanded to heal the wounds they have done.
Haltija väkis of different environments and materials were thought to be in conflicts with each other. For example, when wood is burned, it is an assault in which väki of fire is beating väki of wood. Väki of fire can be used to scare other väki away. For example, if you were made ill by väki of water, that has attached you while you were swimming, this väki and the illness could be removed in sauna that had a lots of väki of fire.
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« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2007, 01:37:47 am »

Terrific...!
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« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2007, 12:39:09 am »

Thank you!

Finnish mythology has many features shared with fellow Finnic Estonian mythology and its non-Finnic neighbours, the Balts and the Scandinavians. Finnish. There myths are also shared with other Fenno-Ugric speakers like the Lapps.

Finnish mythology survived within an oral tradition of mythical poem-singing and folklore well into the 18th century.

Although the gradual influence of surrounding cultures raised the significance of the sky-god in a monolatristic manner, the father god "Ukko" (Old Man) was originally just a nature spirit like all the others. The most sacred animal, whose real name was never uttered out loud, was the bear. The bear was seen as the embodiment of the forefathers, and for this reason it was called by many euphemisms: "mesikämmen" ("mead-paw"), "otso" ("wide brow"), "kontio" ("dweller of the land").

The first historical mention of the beliefs of the Finns is by the bishop Mikael Agricola in his introduction to the Finnish translation of the New Testament in 1551. He describes many of the gods and spirits of the Tavastians and Karelians. Wider studies into Finnish mythology were made only in the 18th century by the preacher-ethnologist Lars Leevi Laestadius in his treatise of Lappish beliefs. The greatest studies were made through historians in the 19th century recording old rural poetry and folklore, most notably Elias Lönnrot who compiled the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic.

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« Reply #20 on: April 01, 2007, 12:41:41 am »



The origins and the structure of the world
 
Structure of the world, according to Finnish mythology.
 
A Sky Domes. For example 6 or 9 of them.
B North star
C Column of sky
  D Kinahmi, the Whirl
E Northern region, Pohjola
F Habitable world
  G Lintukoto at the edge of the world
H Land of the dead, Tuonela, probably upside down

 
The world was believed to have been formed out of a bird's egg exploding. The sky was believed to be the upper cover of the egg, alternately it was seen as a tent, which was supported by a column at the north pole, below the north star.

The movement of the stars was explained to be caused by the sky-dome's rotation around the North Star and itself. A great whirl was caused at the north pole by the rotation of column of sky. Through this whirl souls could go to the underground land of dead, Tuonela.

Earth was probably believed to be flat. At the edges of Earth was Lintukoto, "the home of the birds", a warm region in which birds lived during the winter. The Milky way was called Linnunrata, "the path of the birds", because the birds were believed to move along it to Lintukoto and back. The Milky Way is still called "Linnunrata" in Finnish.

Birds had also other significance. Birds brought a human's soul to him at the moment of birth, and took it away at the moment of death. In some areas, it was necessary to have a wooden bird-figure nearby to prevent the soul from escaping during sleep. This Sielulintu, "the soul-bird", protected the soul from being lost in the paths of dreams.

Waterfowl are very common in tales, and also in stone paintings and carvings, indicating their great significance in the beliefs of ancient Finns.

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« Reply #21 on: April 01, 2007, 12:53:32 am »

Tuonela, the land of the dead

The Finnish version of Hades, the land of dead was Tuonela. It was an underground home or city for all the dead people, not only the good or the bad ones. It was a dark and lifeless place, where everybody slept forever. Still a brave shaman could travel to Tuonela in trance to ask for the forefathers' guidance. To travel to Tuonela, the soul had to cross the dark river of Tuonela. If he had a proper reason, then a boat would come to take him over. Many times a shaman's soul had to trick the guards of Tuonela into believing that he was actually dead.
Ukko, the God of sky and thunder
Ukko ("old man") was a god of the sky, weather, and the crops. He was also the most significant god in Finnish mythology and the Finnish word "ukkonen" (thunder) or "ukonilma" (Ukko's weather), is derived from his name. In the Kalevala he is also called "ylijumala" (overgod), as he is the god of things above. He makes all his appearances in myths solely by natural effects when invoked.
Ukko's origins are probably in Baltic Perkons and the older Finnish sky god Ilmarinen. Also Thor is related to Perkons. While Ukko took Ilmarinen's position as the Sky God, Ilmarinen's destiny was to turn into a smith-hero. In the epic poetry of the Kalevala, Ilmarinen is credited with forging the dome of the sky and the magic mill of plenty, the Sampo.
Ukko's weapon was a hammer, axe or sword, by which he struck lightning. While Ukko mated with his wife Akka ("old woman"), there was a thunderstorm. He created thunderstorms also by driving with his chariot in clouds. The original weapon of Ukko was probably the boat-shaped stone-axe of battle axe culture. Ukko's hammer, the Vasara (means merely "hammer"), probably meant originally the same thing as the boat-shaped stone axe. While stone tools were abandoned in the metal ages, the origins of stone-weapons became a mystery. They were believed to be weapons of Ukko, stone-heads of striking lightnings. Shamans collected and held stone-axes because they were believed to hold many powers to heal and to damage.
The viper with the saw-figure on its skin has been seen as a symbol of thunder. There are stone-carvings which have features of both snakes and powerful legs.

Heroes, gods and spirits

•   Ahti (or Ahto), god of the depths, giver of fish.
•   Ajattara (sometimes Ajatar), an evil forest spirit.
•   Akka ("old lady"), female spirit, feminine counterpart of "Ukko".[citation needed]
•   Äkräs, the god of fertility and the protector of plants, especially the turnip.
•   Antero Vipunen, deceased giant, protector of deep knowledge and magic.
•   Hiisi, demon, originally meaning a sacred grove, later a mean goblin.
•   Iku-Turso, a malevolent sea monster; probably same as Tursas.
•   Ilmarinen, the great smith, maker of heaven. Originally a male spirit of air.
•   Ilmatar, female spirit of air; the daughter of primeal substance of creative spirit. Mother of Väinämöinen in Kalevala.
•   Jumala, a generic name for a major deity. Originally the name given by the Finns to the sky, the sky-god, and the supreme god. Later taivas and Ukko were used as the names for the sky and the sky-god. The word means god and was later used for the Christian God. The origin of the word is unknown – some possible explanations are derivation from Jomali, the supreme deity of the Permians and origination from the Estonian word jume.
•   Kalevanpoika (son/man of Kaleva), a giant hero who can cut down forests and mow down huge meadows, identical with Estonian national epic hero Kalevipoeg.
•   Kave, ancient god of sky, later the deity of the lunar cycle. Father of Väinämöinen. Also Kaleva.[citation needed]
•   Kotitonttu, tutelary of the home.
•   Kullervo, tragic antihero. Model for Túrin Turambar in Tolkien's Silmarillion.
•   Lemminkäinen (Ahti Saarelainen, Kaukomieli), a brash hero.
•   Lempo, originally a fertility spirit,[citation needed] became synonymous with demon in the Christian era.
•   Lalli, Finn who slew Bishop Henry on the ice of Lake Köyliö, according to a legend.
•   Louhi, the matriarch of Pohjola, hostess of the Underworld.
•   Loviatar, the blind daughter of Tuoni and the mother of Nine diseases.
•   Luonnotar, spirit of nature, feminine creator.
•   Menninkäinen, a fairy spirit, gnome.
•   Mielikki, wife of Tapio, the goddess of the forest.
•   Nyyrikki, the god of hunting, son of Tapio.
•   Näkki, the fearsome spirit of pools, wells and bridges. Same as Nix.
•   Otso, the spirit of bear (one of many circumlocutory epithets).
•   Pekko (or Pellon Pekko), the god of crops, especially barley and brewing.
•   Perkele, the Devil. Originally Perkele was not the Devil but a god of thunder and can be seen as an earlier form of Ukko. Related to Baltic Perkunas and Germanic Thor.
•   Pellervo (or Sampsa Pellervoinen), the god of harvest.
•   Pihatonttu, tutelary of the yard.
•   Piru, spirit, demon. Probably later loan word related to "spirit".[citation needed]
•   Päivätär, the goddess of day.[citation needed]
•   Rahko, the Karelian god of time; Rahko tars the moon describes the phases of the moon.[citation needed]
•   Surma, the personification of a violent death.
•   Saunatonttu, tutelary of the sauna.
•   Tapio, the god of the forest.
•   Tellervo, the goddess of the forest, daughter of Tapio and Mielikki.
•   Tonttu, generally benign tutelary. Originally, a patron of cultivated land, keeper of lot.
•   Tuonetar, name referring to both the mistress and the daughter of Tuoni.
•   Tuoni, the personification of Death.
•   Tursas, the Tavastian god of war. May be same as the Norse Tyr and the Germanic Tîwaz.
•   Tuulikki, daughter of Tapio and Mielikki, goddess of animals.
•   Ukko ("old man") the god of the sky and thunder, related to Thor (Estonian Taara).
•   Vellamo, the wife of Ahti, goddess of the sea, lakes and storms. A current image of Vellamo can be seen on the coat of arms of Päijänne Tavastia.
•   Vedenemo ("mother of waters"), Karelian goddess of water.[citation needed]
•   Väinämöinen, the old and wise man, who possessed a potent, magical voice. The central character in Finnish folklore and he is the main character in the Kalevala
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« Reply #22 on: April 01, 2007, 12:57:34 am »

Kyöpelinvuori, in Finnish mythology, is the place where dead women haunt. It is rumoured that virgins who died at a young age gather there after their death at the start of their afterlife.

Kyöpelinvuori is also well-known in Finland due to Easter: it is said to be the ancient home of mountain witches who fly on brooms with black cats. The witches leave the area only during Easter in order to spook children.



Lemminkäisen äiti by Akseli Gallen-Kallela. The mother of young Lemminkäinen has gone to the river of Tuoni to find the corpse of her dead son. One of the myths told in Kalevala.

Tuonela
 
Tuonela is the realm of the dead or the Underworld in Finnish mythology, similar to Hades in Greek mythology. Tuonela, Tuoni, Manala and Mana are often used synonymously.

Tuonela is best known for its appearance in the Finnish national epic Kalevala. In the 16th song of Kalevala, Väinämöinen, a shamanistic hero, travels to Tuonela to seek the knowledge of the dead. On the journey he meets the ferryman (similar to Charon), a girl, Tuonen tytti, or Tuonen piika (Death's maid), who takes him over the river of Tuoni. On the isle of Tuoni, however, he is not given the spells he was looking for and he barely manages to escape the place. After his return he curses anyone trying to enter the place alive.

Tuonela is used as the translation for the Greek word ᾍδης in Finnish translations of the Bible. In Christianity it is often interpreted as the resting place of the dead before the Last Judgement.



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« Reply #23 on: April 01, 2007, 08:27:12 pm »

The Return of Väinömöinen

As the years passed Wainamoinen [sic]
Recognized his waning powers,
Empty-handed, heavy-hearted,
Sang his farewell song to Northland,
To the people of Wainola;
Sang himself a boat of copper,
Beautiful his bark of magic;
At the helm sat the magician,
Sat the ancient wisdom-singer.
Westward, westward, sailed the hero
O'er the blue-back of the waters,
Singing as he left Wainola,
This his plaintive song and echo:
"Suns may rise and set in Suomi,
Rise and set for generations,
When the North will learn my teachings,
Will recall my wisdom-sayings,
Hungry for the true religion.
Then will Suomi need my coming,
Watch for me at dawn of morning,
That I may bring back the Sampo,
Bring anew the harp of joyance,
Bring again the golden moonlight,
Bring again the silver sunshine,
Peace and plenty to the Northland."

Kalevala / Rune 50 (John Martin Crawford translation)

Finnish Paganism by Anssi Alhonen

http://nic-nac-project.de/~anssix/finnish_paganism.html
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« Reply #24 on: April 07, 2007, 07:32:58 pm »

"Suns may rise and set in Suomi,
Rise and set for generations,
When the North will learn my teachings,
Will recall my wisdom-sayings,
Hungry for the true religion."

This is really beautiful!

Thanks Aphrodite and Boreas!

Aphro,

I wish I knew more of the saga and the Rot that I could tell you about Ukko and Aka and the others from the standpoint of Ior Bock.   
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Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
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« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2007, 08:41:43 pm »

...adding to the above:

Ukko and Ata are the Alfather and Il-matar (earth mother) ...now these are not gods, they are ancestors.  Each generation had one of each.  In the early times, the king and queen had sons and daughters and each had a role to fulfill in the culture and community. 

"Frej and Freja, the first Bock and Svan (cf English “swan”) bore 12 sons and 7 daughters, at least. The first son was C po il Marinen, called Ra, and the first daughter Maia (cf English May and maypole). These first born became king and qvena (king and queen) of the entire human family being procreated; although they did not themselves bear children. They represented the Moon and wisdom upon Earth among humans, while Bock and Svan, their parents, represented the Sun and generation. Only very recently, in Egypt, but several millennia ago, was Ra first misappointed to represent and thus became associated with the Sun.

S = Solen = Sun; VAN means One. S…VAN, SVAN, the one with the Sun, the Bock, the breeder, hence Bock and Svan, who became OK and AKA (“ooo-co” and “ah-ka”); ALFADER and MATAR “All Father and Earth Mother, to ALL humans.
The roles of the next 6 daughters and the next 10 sons born to Bock and Svan are being omitted from this brief introduction; suffice it to say, for the moment, that none of these ten sons sired offspring, while the six daughters were eligible to become Disas, whose role will be discussed shortly. These direct offspring, plus their parents of Bock and Svan make up the Piroet family.

The 12th son of Bock and Svan received, at the age of 7, the title Lil Bockin, and at age 27 (after, among other preparations, having listened to the saga for 20 years) Lil Bockin was given, like his father, the title and role of Bock (progenitor; procreator), and he then mated with his generation’s svan, the ma tar (Earth mother), bearing 12 sons and 7 daughters (at least), the first born of each being Ra and Maia, the 12th son again Lil Bockin becoming Bock at age 27 and beginning, with Svan, the most beautiful and healthy woman on Earth, to continue this basic round of 12 sons and 7 daughters (at least) comprising the Bock or Piroet family (say “pirouette” as in French, please), the first or head family among the Aser, inside Odenma, before Ice Time. The retiring Bock became Ukko (say “ooo co”, co as in coat) or Per, while the retiring Svan became Aka (ah-kah). Hence all pipol were per sons or per daughters. "

http://www.bocksaga.com/articles/a_barker/bocksaga.html

Note that "piroet" means "spiral" ....as in a DNA strand.....P: pole(north pole) i: (see below) r: a Symbol for the king and the moon, Ra is in the sperm (rolling out)  O:(see below) et: (branch) ...north pole/erect ****/king's sperm/sun female/branch ...Piroet family, spiral family....


The two most important sounds in the Alphabet are "o" ( spoken like: root ) and "i" ( spoken like : read ). "O" means Oden, and Oden is everything that exists. Oden is the sun, and Oden is the ring. connecting every being with the sun. It is also the symbol of the female. "i" is the symbol of an erected ****. The dot on the "i" is the sperm from which all people are begot. "i" also stands for information and "i"nside and represents male energy. Everything else arises from these two polar energies.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2007, 09:10:50 pm by rockessence » Report Spam   Logged

ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
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