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THE BACCHANAL OF BURNS NIGHT - 250 ANNIVERSARY OF BARD'S BIRTH

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Author Topic: THE BACCHANAL OF BURNS NIGHT - 250 ANNIVERSARY OF BARD'S BIRTH  (Read 1523 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2008, 02:58:37 pm »

                           








ITI 6843 Robert 'Rabbie' Burns ~ Corporate.


Designed by Lochcarron of Scotland for Robert Burns World Wide Marketing LTD of Ayrshire.



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« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2008, 03:17:10 pm »

   


             

              Burns Robert Check tartan


« Last Edit: January 25, 2009, 07:27:35 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #17 on: January 21, 2009, 09:04:36 pm »




               

               Burns Heritage Check Corporate
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« Reply #18 on: January 21, 2009, 09:23:22 pm »





             








                                 WEARING OF SASHES BY LADIES IN EVENING DRESS






The manner of wearing tartan sashes or light scarves had customary significance even two centuries ago, and whilst the wearing of sashes in any particular manner has so far no legal significance, a due respect for tradition suggests that uniform practice, and implication consistent with custom, is desirable.

The different methods undermentioned to wearing such are appropriate for ladies in different circumstances. All these suggestions are based on a careful study of old portraits, prints and traditional practice, and bear the authoritative approval of the Lord Lyon King of Arms.



No 1. Style worn by clans-women. The sash is worn over the right shoulder across the breast and is secured by a pin or small brooch on the right shoulder.

No. 2 Style worn by Chieftainesses, wives of clan chiefs and wives of the Colonels of Scottish Regiments. The sash which may be rather fuller in size is worn over the left shoulder and secured with a brooch on the left shoulder.

No. 3 Style worn by ladies who have married out of their clan, but who still wish to use their original clan tartan. The sash usually longer than No 1 style, is worn over the right shoulder secured there with a pin and fastened in a large bow on the left hip.

No 4. Style worn by country dancers or where any lady desires to keep the front of the dress clear of the sash (as, for example, when wearing the ribband of a chivalric order, or any orders and decorations). This style is similar to the belted plaid, and is really a small arisaid. It is buttoned on at the back of the waist, or is held by a small belt, and is secured at the right shoulder by a pin or small brooch, so that the ends fall backwards from the right shoulder and swing at the back of the right arm.



http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/lordlyon_sash.htm
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« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2009, 09:33:59 pm »



                                   



                                    WEARING OF THE KILT

                                         SEAN CONNERY
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 09:34:39 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2009, 07:33:52 pm »



A "Souter Johnny" reciting Robert Burns outside Burn's cottage in Alloway









                                                  Scots celebrate Bard's birthday 
 


BBC NEWS
Jan. 25, 2009

Thousands of people have taken part in events to mark the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, Scotland's national bard.

The celebrations were led by First Minister Alex Salmond.

It also marked the launch of a year-long programme of events which the Scottish Government hopes will raise the country's profile.

A procession took place in Dumfries and there were further events which took place in Alloway, Burns' birthplace.

Sunday's events began with Mr Salmond attending a church service in Alloway, while Culture Minister Linda Fabiani and the Duke of Buccleuch took part in another commemorative event in Dumfries.

Mr Salmond later attended a wreath-laying ceremony at a statue of Burns in Ayr and then went on to the Dumfries lantern procession attended by thousands.



"The 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns has been celebrated
on a global scale and as it should be -
with dancing, singing, laughter and of course the odd dram "

Alex Salmond
First Minister



The first minister quoted from the poem on BBC Scotland's The Politics Show - a quotation which ended with the phrase "the man of independent mind looks and laughs at all that".

A number of events and exhibitions took place at various locations in Ayrshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

The day also marked the start of the "Homecoming 2009" celebrations which will see more than 300 events being held across the Scotland until St Andrew's Day at the end of November.

The Scottish Government is asking "affinity" Scots around the world to return home and join the celebrations with 100,000 tourists expected and a 40m boost to the economy.
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« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2009, 07:41:46 pm »





             









'Flying start'



Mr Salmond said: "Homecoming Scotland could not have got off to a better start with tens of thousands of people taking part in sell out events across Scotland, and around the globe.

"The 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns has been celebrated on a global scale and as it should be - with dancing, singing, laughter and of course the odd dram.

"I have no doubt that if he were here today, Robert Burns would make every effort to attend every single one of the 300 events we have planned across Scotland this year.

"And he would be delighted to see his year of birthday celebrations off to such a flying start."
« Last Edit: January 25, 2009, 08:05:57 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #22 on: January 25, 2009, 08:00:33 pm »





http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/250th-Birthday-Poet-Robert-Burns/ss/events/lf/012709robertburns250
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« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2009, 10:53:54 pm »





               









                                             250TH CELEBRATION OF ROBERT BURNS' BIRTH






Prime Minister Gordon Brown (L) and Chancellor of the Exchequer Alistair Darling inspect a commemorative
Robert Burns coin at No. 10 Downing Street on January 20, 2009.

Scots all around the world are celebrating the 250th anniversary of the birth of Burns -- whose works include "Auld Lang Syne" -- with whisky, haggis and poetry readings.


(AFP/Pool/File/Sang Tan)
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« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2009, 10:57:26 pm »





               






A bronze statue of Scottish poet Robert Burns on display at the Domain Gardens in Sydney. Scots all around the world are celebrating the 250th anniversary of the birth of Burns -- whose works include "Auld Lang Syne" -- with whisky, haggis and poetry readings.

(AFP/File)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2009, 10:59:30 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2009, 11:00:30 pm »




             






Scots around the world are celebrating the 250th anniversary of the birth of national bard Robert Burns -- whose works include "Auld Lang Syne" -- with whisky, haggis and poetry readings.


(AFP/File/
John Paul)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2009, 11:01:21 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2009, 11:06:58 pm »



             






Prime Minister Gordon Brown (right) looks at the commemorative Robert Burns coin presented to him by Chief Executive of Royal Mint Andrew Stafford (left) as Scottish Secretary Jim Murphy looks on during a reception at 10 Downing Street, in London, to mark the 250th anniversary of the poet's birth, on January 20.


(AFP/Pool/File/
Sang Tan)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2009, 11:07:50 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #27 on: February 22, 2009, 11:09:16 pm »




               






Prime Minister Gordon Brown looks at stamps of Scotland's national poet Robert Burns on January 20, 2009. Scotland on Saturday began a year of events to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of national poet Robert Burns, targeting a tourism boost to its recession-hit economy.


(AFP/POOL/File/
Sang Tan)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2009, 11:10:04 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2009, 11:11:12 pm »




               






Commemorative British stamps featuring Scottish poet Robert Burns. Scotland on Saturday began a year of events to commemorate the 250th anniversary of the birth of national poet Robert Burns, targeting a tourism boost to its recession-hit economy.


(AFP/POOL/File)
« Last Edit: February 22, 2009, 11:12:08 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2009, 12:29:21 pm »












                                           Hands off our haggis, say Scots after English claim


             Food historian revives debate by claiming first printed reference to haggis was in book called


                                                              The English Hus-Wife






James Meikle
guardian.co.uk,
Monday 3 August 2009
Haggis from Patricks of Camelon.
Photograph:
Andrew Milligan/PA

A former world champion haggis maker today defended Scotland's claim to the dish after a food historian said the first recipe she could find for the dish was in an English book.

Catherine Brown caused consternation by citing the first printed reference to haggis as being in a book called The English Hus-Wife, from 1615 well before the first Scottish mention, in 1747, and 171 years ahead of Robert Burns's paean to "the great chieftain o' the puddin' race". Brown said the book, by Gervase Markham, indicated haggis was first eaten in England before being popularised in Scotland.

Robert Patrick, from the butchers Patricks of Camelon, in Falkirk, said: "I find it hard to believe. I think we can still call it Scottish. There could well be some recipe in England that's similar. But the things that go in it are Scottish. There's a lot of mutton and oatmeal in the product."

Patrick, who was world champion haggis maker in 2003/4 and runner-up in 2007/8, said: "I am sure the customers will be as upset as me to think that England will steal our recipe."

Brown is standing firm, however. "It was originally an English dish. In 1615, Gervase Markham says it is very popular among all people in England. By the middle of the 18th century another English cookery writer, Hannah Glasse, has a recipe that she calls Scotch haggis, the haggis that we know today."

The dispute is not the first over the origins of haggis, which is traditionally made using sheep's heart, liver and lungs cooked in a sheep's stomach with oatmeal and onions, and served with neeps and tatties (turnips and potatoes). The chef Clarissa Dickson Wright has suggested the dish may have had Scandinavian origins, while other theories have pointed to Homeric antiquity, the Romans and the Norman French.
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