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SUTTON HOO - My Buried History

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Bianca
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« Reply #75 on: January 16, 2008, 06:57:42 pm »



Excavations in progress under the proposed new Visitor Centre.



 






The most important grave was that of a warrior. He was buried covered by his shield, and these fierce
images decorated his shield.

The top image possibly represents a sea creature with his jaws to the right,
the bottom one perhaps a bird of prey with a snake in his claws.
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« Reply #76 on: January 16, 2008, 07:03:50 pm »



There were not only burials (inhumations) in the cemetery, but also cremations.

One of the cremations was in the splendid bronze hanging bowl, with 'Celtic' style decorations.






 


In 1986, a local farmer, harrowing a field at Bromeswell, not far from the cemetery found three pieces
of a shallow bronze bucket about the size of a casserole dish. There was an inscription around the top:

"Use this in good health, Master Count, for many happy years".









When the bowl was cleaned, they discovered a frieze of hunters. The bucket was probably made in a
workshop in Antioch during the 6th century AD,
and eventually made its way to the Anglo-Saxon world.


http://www.archaeology.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=26&Itemid=30&limit=1&limitstart=0
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« Reply #77 on: January 16, 2008, 08:04:38 pm »








An Anglo Saxon cemetery has been uncovered during an archaeological dig at one of the UK's most important historic sites.

The 1,500-year-old burial plots were found at Sutton Hoo, in Suffolk, where a 24m (80ft) long, wooden ship
and treasure were discovered in 1939.

The investigative dig was being done ahead of construction work for a new visitors' centre on the site, due
to open in 2002.

Archaeologists found artefacts and remains that indicated at least 18 cremations and five burials dating from
the 6th or early 7th centuries.

The discovery included a rare type of ornamental bronze bowl, called a hanging bowl, which accompanied one
of the cremations.

The Suffolk County Council Archaeological Field Project Team said the male bodies were buried with spears and shields, and the females with ring brooches and beads.

What remains of these items has been removed from the site for safe keeping and further investigation.






Medieval Britain



The exact location of the cemetery is about 500m from the boat find of 61 years ago, on the bank of the
River Deben near Woodbridge.

"We're thrilled that these discoveries will add to the knowledge we have about Sutton Hoo," said Dr Rosemary Hoppitt, chairman of the Sutton Hoo Society.

 
"And we are delighted the visitor centre is being built because it will help present this important site to the
public in the way it should be for the first time.

"If the development had not been going ahead we would never have found these new items."

The treasures uncovered in 1939 are now on display in the British Museum. The hoard of gold and silver items - believed to be the treasure of one of the earliest English kings, Radwald, King of East Anglia - included a
ceremonial helmet that has become one of the defining images of early Medieval Britain.

The find forced a rethink of the period known as the Dark Ages and showed people living at that time had previously unimagined sophistication and culture, as well as a structured society.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/low/sci/tech/802819.stm
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« Reply #78 on: March 01, 2008, 09:16:43 am »

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« Reply #79 on: March 01, 2008, 09:19:57 am »

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« Reply #80 on: March 01, 2008, 09:29:50 am »



EXHIBITION HALL ENTRANCE. SUTTON HOO









http://www.sheshen-eceni.co.uk/sutton_hoo_info.html
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« Reply #81 on: January 18, 2009, 11:11:25 am »










                                                           Ghost Ship of Sutton Hoo


 
                      The Anglo-Saxon ghost ship of Sutton Hoo was uncovered by archaeologists in 1939.







It is the best preserved example of North European boat building that has been discovered to date and featured a burial chamber located above the ship’s central area that has yielded many priceless and beautiful historical treasures, including armour, weapons, gold objects, coins and clothing.

Although no body was uncovered at the Sutton Hoo ship site, chemical remains suggest that somebody was interred there, possibly that of King Raedwald or King Sigebert, who were both 7th century kings in the area.

The Sutton Hoo boat is referred to as a “ghost ship” because none of the solid material that the boat was constructed from is still remaining - the boat was painstakingly uncovered in fossil form after the wood and other organic materials used to construct the boat dissolved into the surrounding sand and a fossilised cast of the boat was created over hundreds of years.

As well as being the best preserved example from the period, the Sutton Hoo ship is also the largest excavated boat, measuring over 27 metres in length and 4.5 metres in width.

Experts examined artefacts recovered from the site and the ship’s design itself to date it as hailing from between 625 and 637AD.

The rivet positions in the boat’s fossilised cast showed that the Sutton Hoo boat was “clinker built”, meaning its hull consisted of a series of overlapping planks – a style of boat construction still in use today.

Examination of the ship shows that it was probably powered by 40 oarsmen – 20 on each side – and steered by a rudder – though experts believe the rudder was removed before the ship was transported for burial at the Sutton Hoo site.

Information on the Sutton Hoo burial and some of the artefacts uncovered therein are on display in the British Museum in London.
 
 
 
 Photo:
British Museum



http://www.discoverychannel.co.uk/ships/ancient_ships/ghost_ship/index.shtml
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« Reply #82 on: January 18, 2009, 11:34:38 am »









                                   T.C. Lethbridge and the Sutton Hoo Ship-Burials






11th Oct 2007


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It is said: “When St. Wilfred came to preach to the South Saxons, they had lost the art of fishing with nets altogether except for eels, and he had to teach them afresh.” Bede: ‘Ecclesiastical History’

Before the outbreak of World War II in 1939, T.C. Lethbridge and his friend C.F. Tebbutt were commissioned by the Admiralty to visit Iceland - an account of which appears in Lethbridge’s privately published book News From Tili.(1) However, during their Arctic escapade, a remarkable archaeological excavation was taking place back home in Blighty.

Mrs Edith May Petty – owner of the Sutton Hoo estate - had always been inquisitive about the cluster of ancient burial mounds that existed beneath gorse and bracken near to her home. As a consequence of this curiosity, she commissioned local archaeologist Basil Brown to undertake an exploratory excavation of the site in May 1939. His subsequent discovery of a pagan, Anglo-Saxon ship burial was to result in one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the 20th century.

Realising the magnitude of Brown’s discovery, Charles Phillips of Cambridge University was contacted to oversee the dig. Phillips immediately recognised the magnitude of the discovery and realising that experts on Anglo Saxon antiquities need to be involved, he advised Mrs Petty to contact the British Museum. The subsequent discoveries: seventeen burial mounds, buried treasure, great works of art, sacrificed horses and evidence of human execution amounted to one of the most significant archaeological discoveries in Europe, nee the world.

Martin Carver, Professor of Archaeology at the University of York and Director of Research at Sutton Hoo since 1983 suggests: “The exploration of the site is challenging and the interpretation of its meaning always controversial.”(2) Because of this ambiguity, amateurs and professionals alike have, over the years, voiced their own interpretations of the site. Not one to let a major mystery on his own doorstep pass him by, T.C. Lethbridge had his own unique views on the Sutton Hoo burials.

On his return from Iceland, Lethbridge was fortunate enough to witness the first Sutton Hoo ship burial in her mound, or as he most eloquently put it: “the ghost of the vessel ”.(3) During Brown’s initial investigations in Mound 1, he came across clusters of iron ship rivets in the sandy soil. Astutely, he carefully left the rivets in situ and following a pattern, he revealed the outline of a rising stem of a huge buried ship. All of the wood had long since rotted away and all that was left was an eerie, fossil like shape of the mighty ship. On revealing the great ship, Phillips commented: “To me, one of my most satisfying experiences in 1939 was to be able to show the complete hull of the boat with all her clench nails in position, the details of her gunwale strakes strengthened to resist the strain of forty rowers, the faintly visible ghosts of the tholes against which the oars laboured and the specially strengthened point in the stern where the steersman managed his great steering oar.”(4)

The sandy soil into which the ship-burials had been intered had been responsible for dissolving not only the ships, but also any remains of those buried within. The absence of any trace of bone had left many to speculate that the ‘grave’ was not an actual burial, but a cenotaph to the deceased, whose body may well have been lost at sea. Lethbridge was aware of such ritual in Scandinavia, but not in Anglo-Saxon graves in Britain. Having excavated a number of contemporary cemeteries in Cambridgeshire, most notably; Shudy Camps, Burwell and Hollywell Row, he was well aware of the destructive nature of the soil in the vicinity. He was also aware that the idea of a cenotaph was very different from that of providing the actual body with goods to use at its resurrection, as was the case at Sutton Hoo.

Lethbridge was curious to know if the boat burials at Sutton Hoo were a distortion of an ancient Roman burial custom. The idea of creating a home for the dead was common in Britain, with roots as far back as the Neolithic. He therefore concluded that the boat burial was an extension of this conjecture. Having already pursued the correlation between the skin-covered tent and the upturned boat, he was certain that the Sutton Hoo burials were related to this line of thinking.(5) Although the ship burial culture was prevalent in Scandinavia during Anglo-Saxon times, he was astutely aware that there had been no close exchange of ideas of personal ornament between Norway and England in the Dark Ages until the Viking raids began two hundred years later.(6)

Lethbridge observed that the Sutton Hoo ship he had visited looked like a large canoe. Having had the privy of examining Icelandic open cod-boats – direct descendents of the Viking boats – he realised that the ship uncovered by Brown and Phillips was not of this lineage. He noted that the direct ancestors of the Viking ships were like those discovered at Kvalsund in Norway. He therefore concluded that the Sutton Hoo boats were more likely representatives of a Baltic line of origin.

If, as our opening quote from the Venerable Bede suggests: St. Wilfred had to reacquaint the South Saxons with the art of fishing, then it is likely that he taught them something he learnt from Roman provincials. Lethbridge was familiar with the Sussex luggers and suggested that the designs past on by St. Wilfred were direct descendents of this line of evolution and bore no resemblance to the war ships buried at Sutton Hoo. Nearly all of the Viking Age and Danish boats found on the Continent are double-ended, but he understood that only two out of the three Anglo-Saxon boats found in East Anglia had square sterns(7) and Lethbridge adjudged these to be boats of the coble type.(Cool He suggested that this feature, hitherto unknown in Teutonic shipbuilding, indicates some outside influence at work in England. He believed that local types - in use on estuaries to which the Saxons came - had influenced the Saxon boat-builders in the seventh century C.E. He suggested that if we could associate this long, sheerless type of boat all up the east coast of England, then the case for Viking ancestry would be stronger, but this did not appear to be the case.

It is likely that Lethbridge was invited to view the Sutton Hoo site by his good friend Sir Thomas Kendrick – Keeper of British and Medieval Antiquities at British Museum. In turn, it was Charles Phillips who had requested Kendrick – the eminence grise of Anglo-Saxon art – onto the dig when Edith Pretty kindly bequeathed the Sutton Hoo finds to the British Museum. On realising the significance of the undertaking, Kendrick charged Rupert Bruce-Mitford – an assistant keeper in the British Museum’s Department of British and Medieval Antiquities to bring the ship-burial to publication: it was a task that was to become Bruce-Mitford’s life work. Although Lethbridge and Phillips were known to each other at Cambridge, Phillips did not hide the fact that he questioned his colleague’s approach and methodology,(9) so it is likely that the Lethbridge’s invitation down to Sutton Hoo came directly from Kendrick.

Phillips might not have welcomed Lethbridge’s contribution, but without doubt, his intervention added to the rich tapestry of ideas that contributed to making Sutton Hoo one of the most remarkable and intriguing archaeological finds ever. Lethbridge was astutely aware of the dogma that was accumulating around his profession and he astutely realised that even the layman’s opinion had a role to play in his vocation. He realised the importance of local knowledge and took every opportunity to encourage and nurture the thoughts and opinions of even those with peripheral expertise. His report ‘Boredom in Archaeology’ (‘The Archaeological News Letter’ Vol.3/No.6 – December, 1950) later provided a persuasive anthropological argument for this train of thought.


welbourn TEKH
- Grantham
- October 2007
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« Reply #83 on: January 18, 2009, 11:36:03 am »



             








Notes and References:




1. Note: Iceland, or Tili, as it was known in the days of the Venerable Bede, was considered to be six-days sail from Britain.

2. Carver, M. (1998) “Sutton Hoo: Burial Ground of Kings?” British Museum Press. pxii.

3. Lethbridge, T.C. (1948) “Merlin’s Island” Metuen & Co. p.106

4. Phillips, C.W. (1987) “My Life in Archaeology” Alan Sutton. P78.

5. Note: These ideas were later to surface in ‘Merlin’s Island’

6. Schetelig, H. (1907) “Cruciform Brooches of Norway” John Brieg: Bergen.

7. Note: The 42’ boat discovered at Snape Common had a square stern. Phillips informed Lethbridge that the boat found beneath the smaller mound at Sutton Hoo also had a square stern.

8. Note: As well as the two Sutton Hoo ship-burials discovered in 1939 above the river Deben, another was found in 1862 at Snape Common near Aldeburgh overlooking the River Alde.

9. Phillips, C.W. (1987) “My Life in Archaeology” Alan Sutton. “In general such archaeological activities as there were at Cambridge were in the hands of a little clique of substantial means headed by T.C. Lethbridge of Trinity, who was an able enough man but unpredictable and often uncooperative.” p.7 “Men like T.C. Lethbridge and Charles Leaf seemed to be able to do rather second-rate work and get away with it. Leaf was a victim of the late war but Lethbridge, though very able and producing interesting ideas, had no real conscience in his work in the last analysis.” P.33



http://www.tc-lethbridge.com/tekhs_journal/?id=121
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« Reply #84 on: January 18, 2009, 12:01:56 pm »



BRITAIN ca 600CE









                                                     KINGDOM OF THE EAST ANGLES






The Kingdom of the East Angles or Kingdom of East Anglia was one of the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

The kingdom was named after the homeland of the Angles, Angeln in northern Germany, and initially consisted
of Norfolk and Suffolk, names which possibly arose during or after the Danish settling ("North folk [people]" and "South folk [people]").

Upon the marriage of the East Anglian princess Etheldreda, the Isle of Ely also became part of the kingdom.
The boundaries of the region, however, are vague. The modern region of East Anglia is named after it.

The Kingdom of the East Angles, formed about the year 520 by the merging of the North and the South Folk (Angles who had settled in the former lands of the Iceni during the previous century) was one of the seven Anglo-Saxon heptarchy kingdoms (as defined in the 12th century writings of Henry of Huntingdon). For a brief period following a victory over the rival kingdom of Northumbria around the year 616, East Anglia was the most powerful of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms of England, and its king Raedwald was Bretwalda (overlord of the Anglo-Saxons kingdoms). But this did not last: over the next forty years, East Anglia was defeated by the Mercians twice, and it continued to weaken relative to the other kingdoms until in 794, Offa of Mercia had its king Æthelberht killed and took control of the kingdom himself.

The independence of the East Anglians was restored by a successful rebellion against Mercia (825–827), in course of which two Mercian kings were killed attempting to crush it. On November 20, 870 the Danes killed King Edmund and took the kingdom, which they named East Anglia (see Ivar the Boneless). The Saxons retook the area in 920, only to lose it again in 1015–1017, when it was conquered by Canute the Great and given as a fiefdom to Thorkell the Tall, who was made Jarl of East Anglia in 1017.
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« Reply #85 on: January 18, 2009, 12:09:34 pm »









                                             List of monarchs of East Anglia







This is a chronological list of the monarchs of East Anglia, formally known as The Kingdom of the East Angles, one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy.

It was founded in the 6th century and ceased being independent in 918, having been conquered by Wessex, another member of the Heptarchy.

Many of the dates of this time are considered unreliable, often being based on computation from known dates. Regnal years may be counted twice, since all or part of a year may be attributed: for instance, the period attributed below to Ricberht (the East Anglian apostasy) is said by the contemporary author Bede to have lasted for three years, and is computed allowing all or part of the years 627, 628 and 629 to this interregnum or unknown reign.

The names are given in modern English form, followed by the names and titles (as far as is known) in contemporaneous Anglo-Saxon English and Latin, being the recorded languages of the time. Note that the title 'REX' is not recorded specifically for any East Anglian ruler before Rædwald: the earlier names derive from the genealogical tally (not regnal list) in the Anglian Collection and the Historia Britonum.

They are normally styled rulers of the East Angle people (Angli Orientales), not of East Anglia (Anglia Orientalis). The title Rex Anglorum is used of Rædwald, and Rex Ang. (indeterminate, probably Anglorum) of Aethelstan and Eadmund in their coinage.

This was a time when spellings varied widely, even within a document. A number of variations of the details below exist. Amongst these are the preference between þ and ð (voiceless and voiced th).

A character resembling '7' (the so-called Tironian et) was used as the ampersand '&' in contemporary Anglo-Saxon writings. The era pre-dates the emergence of forms of writing accepted today, notably minuscule, and the letters 'W' and 'U'. Where W was followed by U this was generally rendered as 'VV' (which was also used for 'W' alone).

For a graphical chart of the first kings, see this family tree.
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« Reply #86 on: January 18, 2009, 12:17:53 pm »










                                            List of the Kings of the East Angles






Reign Incumbent Contemporary title Notes



Huh to Huh Wehha VVEHHA VVILHELMING ESTANGLE CYNING

VVEHHA REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 'The first to rule over the East Angles' (Historia Britonum)
ante 571 to 578 Wuffa VVFFA VVEHHING ESTANGLE CYNING

VVFFA REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Eponymous ancestor of the Wuffing dynasty, 'ruling' in 571 (Roger of Wendover)
578 to 599 Tytila TYTTLA VVFFING

TYTTLA REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 'Took up the helm of the kingdom' (Roger of Wendover)
599 to 624 Rædwald RÆDVVALD TYTTLING ESTANGLE CYNING

RÆDVVALD REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Imperium; Rex Anglorum (Bede). Bretwalda (Anglo-Saxon Chronicle).
617 to 618 Eni ENI TYTTLING ESTANGLE CYNING

ENI REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM not known to have reigned
c.624 to c.627 Eorpwald EORPVVALD RÆDVVALDING ESTANGLE CYNING

EORPVVALD REX ANGLORUM ORIENTALIUM Murdered by Ricberht.

c.627 to c.629 Ricberht RICBRYHT REX ANGLORUM ORIENTALIUM not known to have reigned

c.629 to ?634 Sigeberht SIGEBRYHT RÆDVVALDING ESTANGLE CYNING

SIGEBRYHT REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Joint king with Ecgric; abdicated; Slain in battle; Saint Sigeberht.


Son or Stepson of Rædwald.


ante 634 to ?636 Ecgric ECGRIC ESTANGLE CYNING

ECGRIC REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Slain in battle; kinsman of Sigeberht
presumed son of Rædwald or Eni.
636 to 654 Anna ANNA ENING ESTANGLE CYNING

ANNA REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Slain in battle
654 to 15 November 654 Æthelhere ÆÞELHERE ENING ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELHERE REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 
late 654 to 664 Æthelwold ÆTHELVVOLD ENING ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELVVOLD REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 
663 or 664 to 713 Ealdwulf EALDVVLF ESTANGLE CYNING

EALDVVLF REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 
c.713 to 749 Ælfwald ÆLFVVALD ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆLFVVALD REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 
749 to ? Hun HVN ANGLORUM ORIENTALIUM Joint ruler (possibly mythic)

749 to c.760 Beorna BEORNA ESTANGLE CYNING

BEORNA REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Joint king
749 to ? Alberht ALBERHT ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Joint ruler; also known as Æthelberht I

?c.760 to ?c.779 Æthelred I ÆÞELRED ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELRED REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Possibly mythic

?779 to 794 Æthelberht II ÆÞELBRYHT ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELBRYHT REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Saint Æthelbert.
Executed at the command of Offa





Mercian Dynasty



c.760 to 796 Offa OFFA ÞINCFRIÞING MIERCNA 7 ESTANGLE CYNING

OFFA REX MERCIA ET ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS

OFFA REX ANGLORVM Held dominion over East Angles





East Anglian Dynasty



after 794 to ? Eadwald EADVVALD ESTANGLE CYNING

EADVVALD REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 





Mercian Dynasty



c.796 to 821 Coenwulf COENVVLF MIERCNA 7 ESTANGLE CYNING

COENVVLF REX MERCIA ET ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Held dominion over East Angles

821 to 823 Ceolwulf COELVVLF MIERCNA 7 ESTANGLE CYNING

COELVVLF REX MERCIA ET ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Held dominion over East Angles

823 to 826 Beornwulf BEORNVVLF MIERCNA 7 ESTANGLE CYNING

BEORNVVLF REX MERCIA ET ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Held dominion over East Angles





East Anglian Dynasty



c.821 to c.839 Æthelstan ÆÞELSTAN ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELSTAN REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM styled Rex Anglorum (coins)

c.839 to 855 Æthelweard ÆÞELVVEARD ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELVVEARD REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM 

855 to 20 November 870 Eadmund EADMVND ESTANGLE CYNING

EADMVND REX ANGLORVM ORIENTALIVM Martyred; Saint Edmund.
Styled Rex Anglorum (coins)
Sub-kings under Norse Suzerainty

870 to 876 Oswald OSVVALD ESTANGLE CYNING
OSVVALD REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Died 876

876 to 879 Æthelred II ÆÞELRED ESTANGLE CYNING

ÆÞELRED REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Replaced by Alfred the Great of Wessex in 879

879 to 890 Guthrum the Old AÞELSTAN ESTANGLE CYNING

AÞELSTAN REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Norse ruler Guthrum the Old, took name Æthelstan at baptism

890 to 902 Eohric

(Eohric) ERIC ESTANGLE CYNING

ERIC REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Killed in battle December 902

902? Æthelwold of Wessex AÞELWALD ESTANGLE CYNING

AÞELWALD REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Killed in battle December 902?

902 to 916 Guthrum II GUTHRUM ESTANGLE CYNING

GUTHRUM REX ANGLIÆ ORIENTALIS Killed in battle 916



After 917, East Anglia was under the rule of Wessex, with subsequent rulers downgraded to the status of Earl of East Anglia.



RETRIEVED FROM

wikipedia.org
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« Reply #87 on: March 19, 2009, 02:08:00 pm »








                                     70th anniversary of Sutton Hoo's discovery






Thursday, 19 Mar 2009

It was in 1939 an astonishing discovery was made at Sutton Hoo in Suffolk - the ship burial of an
Anglo-Saxon warrior king and his most treasured possessions.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of this amazing discovery and to celebrate the occasion
The National Trust are holding a 1930s garden party, just as there was 70 years ago.

Mrs. Edith Pretty owned the estate at the time of discovery in 1939. She had brought in local archaeologist Basil Brown the year before to investigate the mounds located on the site, under
the supervision of Guy Maynard, curator at Ipswich Museum.

The mounds that he excavated had previously been looted, but several ornaments and remains
that were left behind suggested that these had been the graves of important pagan Anglo-Saxons.

However, in the spring of 1939, as the outbreak of the Second World War loomed and Hitler was threatening to invade - Basil Brown made the discovery of a lifetime.

With the help of Edith Pretty’s Gardener John Jacobs and Gamekeeper William Spooner, he discovered the remains of a 27 metre long ship and the undisturbed remains of a burial chamber, of what is now thought to be Raedwald, Anglo-Saxon king of East Anglia.

Realising the importance of the discovery, Edith Pretty sought the advice of Charles Phillips of Cambridge University, who was then brought in to take over the excavation.

Before long a breathtaking array of treasures was uncovered, the most impressive being the numerous large gold ornaments of the finest workmanship. It was to become one of the richest graves ever excavated in Europe.

Not many knew what was unravelling at Sutton Hoo and the discovery was kept highly secret,
despite this Edith Pretty sent out 300 invitations for a sherry party to give selected guests the
chance to ‘view the excavations of a Viking (sic) Ship'.

It was in fact an Anglo-Saxon ship and referring it to something else would have enraged Phillips.

Charles Phillips and Guy Maynard were both in attendance at the party. There had been bad feeling between the two for some time and it reached a head on the day of the party, consequently the
story of the find was prematurely leaked to the press the following day by Maynard.

Seventy years later, the National Trust, which now cares for the site, will be holding its own 1930s garden party to celebrate the anniversary. Re-enactors will be dressed as characters from the period creating the ambience of the era.

There will be small vignette plays throughout the day by Peppy Barlow and her team of professional actors recreating different aspects of the discovery, such as the procession from the mounds to the house after the treasure had been discovered.

Visitors will be able to see inside Tranmer House, Edith’s former home which is not normally open to
the public. Listen out for the sounds of swing music or why not sit back and enjoy period style sandwiches, orange squash and a cup of tea.

As well as all this, there will be talks by experts and guided tours of the burial mounds.

So, come along to Sutton Hoo and find out more about the archaeological discovery of the century.
The 70th anniversary garden party will be held on Bank Holiday Sunday May 24th, from 10:00 to 17:00.

Normal admission applies.



Chris O'Toole

http://www.travelbite.co.uk/news/uk/england/cambridgeshire/70th-anniversary-sutton-hoo-s-discovery-$1281576.htm
« Last Edit: March 19, 2009, 02:10:24 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #88 on: May 28, 2009, 06:05:41 pm »



Angus Wainwright with a replica of King Redwald's helmet 








                                                          Who's buried at Hoo?






ANDREW CLARKE
EastAngliaDailyTime
5/28/2009

SEVENTY years after its discovery the debate still rages over who was buried in the mound overlooking the River Deben.

Andrew Clarke spoke to National Trust archaeologist Angus Wainwright about the most likely candidate for Sutton Hoo's most celebrated resident.

For many there is no doubt that the ship burial at Sutton Hoo is that of a king - certainly the rich treasures found in the burial chamber lend weight to this argument - but aggravatingly there is no name inscribed on any piece of jewellery, armour or drinking horn to settle the matter beyond any doubt.

As result there has thrown up an endless debate about the identity of the person buried in such splendour.

National Trust archaeologist Angus Wainwright says that carbon dating tests and examination of the artefacts puts the Sutton Hoo finds firmly at the start of the seventh century - unfortunately there is a 40 year margin of error and a number of kings which could fill the slot.

However, he does concede that the most likely candidate is indeed Raedwald - not only King of East Anglia but king of all the kings of Britain.

“The artefacts date from around 600 AD - maybe just a little before and just a little after. Basically you have a 30-40 year period when that grave could have been created and that covers a lot of Kings of East Anglia - which some people still doubt.

“I think it is safe to assume that it is a king, the riches would suggest that. In fact it is the richest burial discovered in Britain and the richest discovered north of the Alps which would suggest that not only is it a king, it is a very important king. This is what leads people to believe it is Raedwald.”

He said that he believes that this is likely because his reign fits the time window they have for the burial and that it would have to be a king of Raedwald's status to warrant such extravagant grave goods. The other clue is that there are clearly Christian objects included in the grave, such as the silver spoons, and it was well known that although Raedwald was converted to Christianity he kept a foot in both camps and continued to pay homage to both the pagan gods and the new Christian God. Therefore finding Christian artefacts in a pagan burial would not be odd if the grave belonged to Raedwald.

“There is a debate paging saying that perhaps the burial is either completely pagan or alternatively completely Christian because it is right on the cusp of the change over from a pagan world to a Christian one. Abroad there were plenty of rich Christians buried with grave goods.”

He said that the other complicating factor is that Mound Two was also a ship burial and because it was robbed there was no way of knowing who was buried there. Could that have been Raedwald or his father or son or brother?

Angus says that excavations in the 1960s and 1980s have made it clear that Sutton Hoo is a royal cemetery and was used only for a brief period - probably for no longer than 60 years.

Coins recovered from the Mound One ship burial were even struck from the same dies as those found the famous Mound Two Sutton Hoo ship burial, suggesting that they were created during a similar time period.

“As far as I am aware Sutton Hoo is unique in that it is the only burial ground we have found which contains only royal burials. Unless we find a name on something, we will never know for sure, but looking at the evidence, I can see no reason why it shouldn't be Raedwald.”
« Last Edit: May 28, 2009, 06:08:58 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #89 on: August 09, 2009, 07:09:34 pm »



'When I visit, the surrounding meadow is shimmering with heat, as it would have been in that long hot summer before the war'

Photo:
JOHN ROBERTSON









                                      Sutton Hoo, Suffolk: On the trail of the Anglo-Saxons



                                        Seventy years ago, the owner of a Suffolk estate
                                           invited guests to celebrate the unearthing of
                                                       a 'Viking' ship on her land.


       Little did she know it would turn out to be one of the most important Anglo-Saxon finds of the century.
 





By Sophie Campbell
28 Jul 2009
Telegraph.co.uk

The sherry party that Mrs Edith Pretty threw at her home above the River Deben in Suffolk on July 25 1939 was one of those occasions that everyone remembers for the wrong reasons. The invitation, dispatched to the great and good of the locality – including the curator of the Ipswich Museum and the Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk – was to celebrate the discovery of a "Viking ship" buried on her land. Along with the sherry, there was to be a lecture by Charles Philips of Cambridge University, who was the leading archaeologist on the dig.

Unknown to Mrs Pretty, as she was assembling her guest list, the ship – hitherto a collection of iron rivets and ghostly ribs of sand – had suddenly yielded a startling secret. At the centre of its hull lay a 1,400-year-old burial chamber containing the funerary objects of a great king. There was corroded evidence of a magnificent helmet and sword; there were fragments of textiles and the remains of a beautiful lyre. There was gold, there were garnets, there was cloisonné; there was enough to keep headline writers busy for weeks. It was to be the find of the century. And the local press were about to turn up.

Also unknown to poor Mrs Pretty, the ship was actually Anglo-Saxon, not Viking. Moreover, Philips and the curator of the Ipswich Museum loathed each other like poison – and the planned Spitfire aerobatic display overhead was to drown out Philips' speech. It all ended with Philips shouting at the Lord Lieutenant to get off the burial mound, and news of the treasure being leaked to the national press.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2009, 07:19:59 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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