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Library of Alexandria (Original)

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Raven
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« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2008, 01:16:29 pm »

bluducky

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   posted 07-27-2004 03:19 AM                       
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If one thinks about the Library, (actually, I read somewhere that it was not just one, NOR two, but at least three libraries, scattered about the city)
Perhaps the 'library' was itself the legendary 'Hall of Records'?
Plato is not the only source of the Atlantis story either. There were other scholars of the Classical Period who also considered Atlantis something worth studying/recording. The only name I can think about at the moment is Homer, in His Illiad.



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« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2008, 01:16:56 pm »

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World's 'oldest university' unearthed in Egypt
Wednesday, May 26, 2004 Posted: 4:04 PM EDT (2004 GMT)


CAIRO, Egypt (AP) -- Polish archaeologists have unearthed 13 lecture halls believed to be the first traces ever found of ancient Egypt's University of Alexandria, the head of the project said Wednesday.
"This is the oldest university ever found in the world," Grzegory Majderek, head of the Polish mission, told The Associated Press.

The lecture halls, with a capacity of 5,000 students, are part of the 5th century university, which functioned until the 7th century, according to a statement from Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities.

"This is the first material evidence of the existence of academic life in Alexandria," Majderek said. Knowledge of earlier intellectual pursuits in the Mediterranean coastal city came through historical and literary documents and materials.

Ancient Alexandria was home to a library, which was founded about 295 B.C. and burned to the ground in the 4th century. Ruins were never found, but Alexandria was an intellectual center where scholars are thought to have produced the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Old Testament, and edited Homer's works.

The auditoriums were found near the portico of the Roman Theater in the eastern part of the ancient city.

All the lecture halls are of identical dimensions. Each contains rows of stepped benches in a form of semicircle and an elevated seat apparently for the lecturer, the Antiquities Department statement said.

Alexandria has tried to recapture some of its intellectual glory, building a $230 million library on the city's renovated seaside promenade with help from around the world.

The new library, which opened in 2002, contains about 240,000 books, a planetarium, conference hall, five research institutes, six galleries and three museums.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/science/05/26/egypt.university.discovery.ap/index.html



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« Reply #17 on: March 31, 2008, 01:18:07 pm »

Chronos

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Ideoxaprist, thank you for the compliment, I look forward to reading more of your own contributions.
Rockessence, it seems unlikely that another ancient library also existed in Scotland, at least in the same time as Alexandria, do you have any more information about it?

Tom, I would be interested also in hearing
the Edgar Cayce reading dealing with the library (libraries) when you locate it, if only to compare it with what we already know of the Library of Alexandria.

quote:

"In 2004 a Polish-Egyptian team claimed to have discovered part of the library while excavating in the Bruchion region. The archaeologists claimed to have found thirteen "lecture halls", each with a central podium. Zahi Hawass, president of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities said that all together, the rooms uncovered so far could have seated 5000 students."

This might well be Alexandria. I wish that the article would have been more specific about the location. This should have been given more press, if it's true! I am skeptical at the moment, though, until I hear more information. At least the names mentioned in the article are reputable ones (somewhat anyway).

Dhill, Helios & Docyabut, interesting contributions. I especially liked the sourcing on your article, Helios.

Has anyone come upon anymore information about the specific ancient knowledge kept there as well as any link it may have had to Atlantis?



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« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2008, 01:18:24 pm »

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Magic Engineer said:

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I have a friend who is going to study to be an archeologist...and according to him, some archeologists theorize that the Library of Alexandria wasn't in Alexandria at all! ...That being said, it's possible we might one day find the TRUE library, and find even greater riches...
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I think this attitude probably springs from Clive Cussler's book "Treasure." It has inspired lots of people to think maybe a part of the library exists somewhere, much like "Atlantis, the Antediluvian World," by Ignatius Donnelly has inspired so many people to look for evidence of Atlantis. True, Cussler's book was a novel wheras Donnelly says, "That the description of this island given by Plato is not, as has been long supposed, fable, but veritable history."

But who knows, really? I'd love for it to be true, especially if we could find the lost works of Archimedes. Wouldn't that just Rock?!



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« Reply #19 on: March 31, 2008, 01:18:46 pm »

Anteros

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For those of you who haven't read Donnelly's book, it's available online HERE to read for free.
Sorry, you have to buy the Cussler book!





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« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2008, 01:19:09 pm »

Chronos

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Actually, Anteros, there are several different accounts attesting to the library's existence. It isn't like Atlantis where we only, albeit arguably, have only the one source. In addition, the writers are some of the most respected of antiquity.
The only facts that seem to be up for dispute is how it was actually destroyed, and by whom.

Quote (from Helios' material, see above):

1. Seneca (AD 49), the first writer to mention it (and that nearly 100 years after the alleged event), definitely says that 40,000 books were burned.


2. Plutarch (c. 117) says that the fire destroyed the great Library.


3. Aulus Gellius (123 - 169) says that during the "sack" of Alexandria 700,000 volumes were all burned.


4. Dio Cassius (155 - 235) says that storehouses containing grain and books were burned, and that these books were of great number and excellence.


5. Ammianus Marcellinus (390) says that in the "sack" of the city 70,000 volumes were burned.


6. Orosius (c. 415), the last writer, singularly confirms Seneca as to number and the thing destroyed: 40,000 books.

Of all the sources, Plutarch is the only one to refer explicitly to the destruction of the Library. Plutarch was also the first writer to refer to Caesar by name. Ammianus Marcellinus' account seems to be directly based on Aulus Gellius because the wording is almost the same.



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« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2008, 01:19:31 pm »

Anteros

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   posted 07-27-2004 12:08 PM                       
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quote:
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Of all the sources, Plutarch is the only one to refer explicitly to the destruction of the Library
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So you believe it may actually still exist? Or at least the works thereof? Like I said, that would be very cool.



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« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2008, 01:19:49 pm »

Chronos

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   posted 07-27-2004 12:27 PM                       
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That's a good question. Well, first of all we have to find out where it was, then we can begin looking for lost knowledge. I suppose, if there is any, we'd be lucky for what we would find.
Even though Plutarch is the only one that specifically mentions the library's destruction, you'll notice that most of the ancien scholars mention the destruction of the books, though the numbers seem to vary. As I said, we'd be lucky if we found anything at all. Then, the ruins of Plato's academy have a similar problem!


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« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2008, 01:20:07 pm »

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   posted 07-27-2004 06:41 PM                       
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I agree, the knowledge might well never be found, even if they do stumble on some ruins. Knowledge is the thing that most counts, correct..?
All of Alexandria has taken quite a beating. The Pharos lighthouse, a "wonder of the world" also lies at the bottom of the sea. The archaeologists diving near Alexandria claim to have found parts of it, but, from what I have heard, that is still a matter up for some dispute.


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« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2008, 01:20:26 pm »

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   posted 07-27-2004 07:02 PM                       
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dhill,
The only other thing was rather squirrelly: That when the Library at Alexandria burned, there were those who were relieved that there still remained the one in the North....Who knows?

To repeat my original question:

"I remember hearing years ago that the other "Great Library" (University) of the time was in Scotland and that many great families of the Mediterranean area sent their sons all the way up there to be educated.

Anybody else hear anything on this?"



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« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2008, 01:20:49 pm »

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  posted 07-27-2004 08:50 PM                       
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friends,
I never quite realized before but there is quite an amazing account of the Library in the Urantia book. Not only did Jesus visit the library and give quite a bit of information about it, including the size and volumes contained but the exact location. Additionally, The Urantia papers contain 196 different papers. All 196 of them are by supermortal authors.... but, 2 are about and completely dedicated to Rodan of Alexandria, surely a valuable contributor to the library. the links follow this short account.....
"3. AT ALEXANDRIA


          It had been an eventful visit at Caesarea, and when the boat was ready, Jesus and his two friends departed at noon one day for Alexandria in Egypt.

          The three enjoyed a most pleasant passage to Alexandria. Ganid was delighted with the voyage and kept Jesus busy answering questions. As they approached the city's harbor, the young man was thrilled by the great lighthouse of Pharos, located on the island which Alexander had joined by a mole to the mainland, thus creating two magnificent harbors and thereby making Alexandria the maritime commercial crossroads of Africa, Asia, and Europe. This great lighthouse was one of the seven wonders of the world and was the forerunner of all subsequent lighthouses. They arose early in the morning to view this splendid lifesaving device of man, and amidst the exclamations of Ganid Jesus said: "And you, my son, will be like this lighthouse when you return to India, even after your father is laid to rest; you will become like the light of life to those who sit about you in darkness, showing all who so desire the way to reach the harbor of salvation in safety." And as Ganid squeezed Jesus' hand, he said, "I will."

          And again we remark that the early teachers of the Christian religion made a great mistake when they so exclusively turned their attention to the western civilization of the Roman world. The teachings of Jesus, as they were held by the Mesopotamian believers of the first century, would have been readily received by the various groups of Asiatic religionists.

          By the fourth hour after landing they were settled near the eastern end of the long and broad avenue, one hundred feet wide and five miles long, which stretched on out to the western limits of this city of one million people. After the first survey of the city's chief attractions÷university (museum), library, the royal mausoleum of Alexander, the palace, temple of Neptune, theater, and gymnasium÷Gonod addressed himself to business while Jesus and Ganid went to the library, the greatest in the world. Here were assembled nearly a million manuscripts from all the civilized world: Greece, Rome, Palestine, Parthia, India, China, and even Japan. In this library Ganid saw the largest collection of Indian literature in all the world; and they spent some time here each day throughout their stay in Alexandria. Jesus told Ganid about the translation of the Hebrew scriptures into Greek at this place. And they discussed again and again all the religions of the world, Jesus endeavoring to point out to this young mind the truth in each, always adding: "But Yahweh is the God developed from the revelations of Melchizedek and the covenant of Abraham. The Jews were the offspring of Abraham and subsequently occupied the very land wherein Melchizedek had lived and taught, and from which he sent teachers to all the world; and their religion eventually portrayed a clearer recognition of the Lord God of Israel as the Universal Father in heaven than any other world religion."

          Under Jesus' direction Ganid made a collection of the teachings of all those religions of the world which recognized a Universal Deity, even though they might also give more or less recognition to subordinate deities. After much discussion Jesus and Ganid decided that the Romans had no real God in their religion, that their religion was hardly more than emperor worship. The Greeks,
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Page 1433
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they concluded, had a philosophy but hardly a religion with a personal God. The mystery cults they discarded because of the confusion of their multiplicity, and because their varied concepts of Deity seemed to be derived from other and older religions.

          Although these translations were made at Alexandria, Ganid did not finally arrange these selections and add his own personal conclusions until near the end of their sojourn in Rome. He was much surprised to discover that the best of the authors of the world's sacred literature all more or less clearly recognized the existence of an eternal God and were much in agreement with regard to his character and his relationship with mortal man.

          Jesus and Ganid spent much time in the museum during their stay in Alexandria. This museum was not a collection of rare objects but rather a university of fine art, science, and literature. Learned professors here gave daily lectures, and in those times this was the intellectual center of the Occidental world. Day by day Jesus interpreted the lectures to Ganid; one day during the second week the young man exclaimed: "Teacher Joshua, you know more than these professors; you should stand up and tell them the great things you have told me; they are befogged by much thinking. I shall speak to my father and have him arrange it." Jesus smiled, saying: "You are an admiring pupil, but these teachers are not minded that you and I should instruct them. The pride of unspiritualized learning is a treacherous thing in human experience. The true teacher maintains his intellectual integrity by ever remaining a learner."

          Alexandria was the city of the blended culture of the Occident and next to Rome the largest and most magnificent in the world. Here was located the largest Jewish synagogue in the world, the seat of government of the Alexandria Sanhedrin, the seventy ruling elders.

          Among the many men with whom Gonod transacted business was a certain Jewish banker, Alexander, whose brother, Philo, was a famous religious philosopher of that time. Philo was engaged in the laudable but exceedingly difficult task of harmonizing Greek philosophy and Hebrew theology. Ganid and Jesus talked much about Philo's teachings and expected to attend some of his lectures, but throughout their stay at Alexandria this famous Hellenistic Jew lay sick abed.

          Jesus commended to Ganid much in the Greek philosophy and the Stoic doctrines, but he impressed upon the lad the truth that these systems of belief, like the indefinite teachings of some of his own people, were religions only in the sense that they led men to find God and enjoy a living experience in knowing the Eternal.

4. DISCOURSE ON REALITY


          The night before they left Alexandria Ganid and Jesus had a long visit with one of the government professors at the university who lectured on the teachings of Plato. Jesus interpreted for the learned Greek teacher but injected no teaching of his own in refutation of the Greek philosophy. Gonod was away on business that evening; so, after the professor had departed, the teacher and his pupil had a long and heart-to-heart talk about Plato's doctrines. While Jesus gave qualified approval of some of the Greek teachings which had to do with the theory that the material things of the world are shadowy reflections of invisible but more substantial spiritual realities, he sought to lay a more trustworthy foundation
for the lad's thinking; so he began a long dissertation concerning the nature of reality in the universe. In substance and in modern phraseology Jesus said to Ganid:

          The source of universe reality is".......
http://www.urantia.com/cgi-bin/webglimpse/mfs/usr/local/www/data/papers?link=http://mercy.urantia.org/papers/paper130.html&file=/usr/local/www/data/papers/paper130.html&line=81#mfs


7. SHINTO

Only recently had the manuscripts of this Far-Eastern religion been lodged in the Alexandrian library. It was the one world religion of which Ganid had never heard. This belief also contained remnants of the earlier Melchizedek teachings as is shown by the following abstracts:
http://www.urantia.com/cgi-bin/webglimpse/mfs/usr/local/www/data/papers?link=http://mercy.urantia.org/papers/paper131.html&file=/usr/local/www/data/papers/paper131.html&line=130#mf s


Aside from Jesus, Paul of Tarsus and Philo of Alexandria were the greatest teachers of this era. Their concepts of religion have played a dominant part in the evolution of that faith which bears the name of Christ.

******

Rodan of Alexandria
http://mercy.urantia.org/papers/paper160.html
http://mercy.urantia.org/papers/paper161.html


enjoy.....





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« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2008, 01:21:13 pm »

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I have enjoyed reading about the available evidence for the existence and destruction of the great library of Alexandria. It amazes me that for such a great institution of knowledge and learning we do not know where the building existed, when it was destroyed or who destroyed it!
The Cayce readings lend support to many of the ideas that have been expressed here so far. The readings especially support the idea the the library had multiple locations and that different groups contributing to the destruction at different time periods.

This reading was for a woman who had lived a life in ancient Egypt.


quote:
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31-1
In the one before this in the period when the entity was as the recorder of conditions then in the land now known as Egypt. The entity then the historian, the writer of the day, and many of those writings as made by the entity were destroyed in the Memphis and Alexandrian libraries; yet some may yet be found in those casements in the pyramid [not] yet uncovered. In that period the entity gave most to the peoples through the ability to coordinate the teachings of the land and the teachings of those in power. Even when the division arose, the entity able to record the actions of each division without showing favor or partiality in either division. Hence the entity was accorded a place of power, position, during that period, by the ruler and by the seer and by him who was ruled as of power in the beginning of this rule. In the name Aassa. The entity gained through this experience, and hence that innate desire to write of such as was experienced often creeps in when the entity least desires same to do so; yet, as given, were the entity to write along these lines the greater success would come to the entity through these channels, for from THIS experience - with that attained in Mercurian forces, as is weighed with the influence of love and Jupiterian - power, glory, honor, bigness of all applicable forces brings the abilities to the entity in the present.
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This reading was for a man who also lived in ancient Egypt. It emphasizes the unique significance of this library and suggests that Alexandria was origially called Deosho.


quote:
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412-5
In the one then before this we find in that experience when there were divisions in the land now known as the Egyptian, land in those periods when there were the reconstruction of those lands and the dividing up of those peoples as to the various rulers, or those who had charge over various portions of the lands and peoples. The entity then among those, or that ONE given charge of that land THEN known as Deosho (?) - now Alexandria - that founded that making for the greatest collection of manuscripts, of writings, of the various forces, that has ever been known in the WORLD of experience in the earth's plane. The ENTITY then the FOUNDER of that as carried on by successive generations of the entity's descendants, as Arieecel [Ariecel]. In this experience the entity gained much through those associations of the ruler and of those that acted with the peoples that became emissaries; for as this was the outlet to many portions of the country to which emissaries and ambassadors were sent, the entity acted in the capacity of the one making the exchange and supplying those forces that builded for relationships with groups and individuals. Hence the ability to meet many elements as may arise in associations or relations with individuals, groups, classes or masses.
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This reading for a contemporary of Barnabas suggests that at least some of the destruction occurred in the second century A.D.


quote:
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452-5
He assisted Barnabas in the establishing of the church in northern Africa, or Alexandria, where so MUCH persecution LATER was shown in the activities in that center. Much that was compiled by the entity in this land was destroyed in or during the second century. This had been compiled in the great library in Alexandria. There are still intact some writings that may yet be reclaimed, in some of the ruins about the place; as well as in some of those cities in Chaldea and Persia where the entity in the last days went in company with Andrew.
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Finally, a reading for an individual who had been one of Herod's wives suggest that Christians, Jews and Muslims may have been partially to blame for the loss.


quote:
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2067-7
(Q) A Reading states that the historic events from the time of the prophets until Christ were written by Thesea, Herod's wife. [See 2067-1, Par. 57 indicating her writings were BASED ON the Alexandrian and the "city in hills" records.] Why did her children destroy these writings in the Alexandrian Library, and are there any of these writings left on earth at the present time?
(A) Her children did not destroy them. They were destroyed by the Mohammedans and the divisions in the church, who were of the Jews and not the Romans nor the mixture of the Roman and Jewish influence. There are not those records save as may be attained from some present in the Vatican.
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« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2008, 01:21:35 pm »

Absonite

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Tom
you just wrote.
"I have enjoyed reading about the available evidence for the existence and destruction of the great library of Alexandria. It amazes me that for such a great institution of knowledge and learning we do not know where the building existed, "
Well Tom besides your following my outstanding post with this Edgar cayce claptrap,.... It really amazes me that I just posted the location of the library......
"By the fourth hour after landing they were settled near the eastern end of the long and broad avenue, one hundred feet wide and five miles long, which stretched on out to the western limits of this city of one million people. After the first survey of the city's chief attractions÷university (museum), library, the royal mausoleum of Alexander, the palace, temple of Neptune, theater, and gymnasium÷Gonod addressed himself to business while Jesus and Ganid went to the library, the greatest in the world. Here were assembled nearly a million manuscripts from all the civilized world: Greece, Rome, Palestine, Parthia, India, China, and even Japan. In this library Ganid saw the largest collection of Indian literature in all the world; and they spent some time here each day throughout their stay in Alexandria. "

Now Tom what about this don't you understand?


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« Reply #28 on: March 31, 2008, 01:21:54 pm »

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Hi Tom ,Cayce did say that Jesus studyed with Judy or Jewry in Egypt,which makes me believe that is where Jewdism might have came from.
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« Reply #29 on: March 31, 2008, 01:22:12 pm »

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He also said there are records of Jesus there in the pyramid, still undiscovered. Maybe the findings will coincide in the meaning of a second comming.
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