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ATLANTIS & the Atlantic Ocean 1 (ORIGINAL)

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« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2007, 09:10:47 pm »








dhill757

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                                                              TENERIFE





http://www.abouttenerife.com/tenerife/legend2.asp

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For centuries, even after the Spanish conquest, it was believed that the islands were the uppermost peaks of the lost continent of Atlantis of which Plato wrote in his "Timeos and Critias".
Atlantis was a big island, "larger than Libya and Asia together", located beyond the Columns of Hercules (the Strait of Gibraltar). It was the dominion of Poseidon, god of the Sea, and it was inhabited by the Atlants, descendants of its first king Atlas, son of the god and a mortal women.

Atlantis was immensely wealthy and the Atlants were the most advanced people of the world. In the center of the continent raised the great capital town with the Palace and the Temple of Poseidon. Its scientists transmitted their skills and civilization knowledges to other peoples, with whom they maintained peace.

Atlants observed their laws of justice, generosity and peace for many generations. But in time they degenerated and became greedy and warlike. Others add that they discovered the secrets of the gods, secrets of cosmic energies and forces which could destroy mankind.

About 11,500 years ago Zeus, king of the gods, punished the Atlants. In the course of a single night volcanoes and tidal waves destroyed the big island in a disaster of cosmic proportions.

According to the legend, only the islands of Azores, Madeira, Canaries and Cape Verde remain from Atlantis. These were the lost continent's highest summits. But its palaces and temples are still to be found in the bottom of the sea, a sea which took its name from Atlantis: the Atlantic Ocean.




"Its steady palaces inhabited by dolphins,

its meadows and gardens carpeted with seaweed..."


(Jacinto Verdaguer - "La Atlántida")
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« Reply #16 on: December 21, 2007, 09:13:17 pm »








Essan

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Well, I'd better add my tuppence worth of objections...
Actually, just the one point really. As I've mentioned elsewhere, there's no conceiveable way for large fauna to reach a mid Atlantic island other than by boat. If there were elephants in a mid Atlantic Atlantis, the Atlanteans must have brought them. Not impossible, but unlikely: although I suppose if Noah loaded 2 of every animal into his ark, maybe the first settlers in Atlantis did the same?
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« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2007, 09:15:20 pm »








Chronos

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Interesting work, Dhill,


There are several things I take from this:


(1) The Egyptians would have described the vicinity Atlantis was situated in as "the Western Ocean," meaning that whatever word the Greeks would have had for it would have been applied, meaning it could have not been within the Pillars of Hercules.

(2) The greater landmass around the Azores that existed around the Ice Age would have been approximately the size of Spain.

(3} The flora of the Azores resembles that of Atlantis, even if there is, like Essan says, still some question as to where the elephants came from.

(4} Local legends of the Azores clearly embrace the Atlantis story, much as the people do in Santorini.
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« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2007, 09:16:55 pm »








Tom Hebert
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These were all good points Dhill and Chronos. As Smiley and I have been preaching for years, the evidence for Atlantis in the Atlantic is overwhelming.

As for the elephants, I don't think it's illogical for them to be in the Atlantic area if you take into account the size of the territory--larger that Asia and Libya combined!

A while back I posted this website showing where scientists have discovered mastodon bones in the Atlantic Ocean!



http://www.graysreef.nos.noaa.gov/information.html


Tom
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« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2007, 09:18:26 pm »








dhill757

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Great points, Chronos, I am especially behind you on the "before" and "beyond" the Pillars point.
Tom,

Thanks for the link on the mastadons! I was missing information on them. Anymore information you have on the mammoths, mastodons and how they relate to the Atlantic Ocean would be greatly appreciated!





Some sad news - Fay Wray (from King Kong) died today. She was always one of my favorite actresses. She was 96. Rest in peace, Fay...
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« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2007, 09:20:30 pm »








dhill757

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                                                           THE DARK OCEAN





A few - it would appear very few - sea explorers reached the Canary Islands during ancient times. The islands lie in the Atlantic Ocean, the so-called "Dark Ocean", into which very few sailors dared to venture. Furthermore, the ocean current called "Canaries Stream" flows in a southwesterly direction before veering to the west to sweep the unwary ocean vessel off to the end of the world, as it was believed during centuries.

Those few Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans who reached the islands and managed to return home to tell their story, surrounded the Canaries in a mist of magic and legend.

According to the Mediterranean sailors' tales, the Atlantic Ocean was inhabited by all kind of monsters which destroyed the vessels and devored their daring crews. You could find at any moment giant whirlpools, storms caused by angry gods or... the end of the world. Once arrived at the world's edge, which was thought to be a flat disc, the unwise seamen would fall into the abyss.

In the opinion of some historians, there was an economic or militar reason for some of these legends. The Phoenicians, skillful sailors and trademen, knew some Atlantic searoutes along the African and European coast. They were not interested at all in having other people as competitors, so they tried to keep visitors at a distance by means of spreading awful rumours and legends.
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« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2007, 09:22:04 pm »








dhill757

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                                                  THE GARDEN OF HESPERYDES





Hesiod -a Greek poet of the 8th century b.C.- wrote about the legendary Garden of Hesperydes. The story starts with Atlas.

Atlas was a Giant, titan Japeto's son. The titans were defeated by Zeus, king of the gods, who confined them in the Tartarus -the hell. Atlas had fought the war on his father's side. According to some opinions, Zeus condemned Atlas to support the vault of heavens upon his shoulders. Other maintain that an angry Perseus showed him Medusa's head thus converting him into a high mountain that supported the sky. Be that as it may, Atlas had to hold up the sky beyond the Columns of Hercules -the Strait of Gibraltar.

Atlas had three daughters, the Hesperydes: Egle, Eritia and Aretusa. The three lived in the most westernly land of the world, some wonderful islands in the Atlantic Ocean, a Garden of Eden where weather was always mild and where golden apples grew on the trees. Goddess Gea (Mother Earth) made sprout those apples as a wedding gift to the king and queen of the gods, Zeus and Hera.

The Hesperydes cultivate the Garden, but a fierce dragon looked after it. It was called Ladon, and it had hundred flame-spewing heads.
Hercules -also called Herakles-, the greatest hero of ancient times, had to perform twelve very difficult tasks, almost impossible to accomplish, the "Twelve Labors of Hercules". Labor number eleven consisted in stealing the Hesperydes' Golden Apples.

Hercules found Atlas supporting the sky near the Ocean, in the mountains which we call today Atlas (Morocco). Since the Garden of Hesperydes' dragon knew Atlas, Hercules persuaded him to go to the islands and steal the apples, while he stayed as supporter of the sky in his place. Atlas went to the Garden in which he could enter since the dragon recognized him, killed the monster, stole the golden apples and returned to the place where Hercules stayed. Atlas, tired of his task, intended to leave Hercules with the burden upon his shoulders, but the hero managed to cheat him. He passed him the burden again and fled with the apples.

And the Garden of Hesperydes? Did it lose its Golden Apples forever? No! They ended by returning to the islands, since they were given to goddess Athena, who gave them back to the gardeners, the Hesperydes.


Concerning Ladon, the watch-dragon killed by Atlas... it lives on in their children, the dragon-trees. According to the legend, the blood flowing from the dragon's wounds fell all over the Garden of Hesperydes. A dragon tree sprouted from each blood drop. Dragon trees -dracaena drago- have massive trunks from which raise a bunch of twisted branches, Ladon's hundred heads. When a piece of bark or a branch are broken, the tree "bleed" a dark-red sap called "dragon-tree blood", which can be used with medical purposes. Dragon trees grow slowly, but they can live for several centuries. There is a specimen at Icod de los Vinos -Tenerife- which is called the "Thousand-year old Dragon Tree". The Guanches, Canarian natives, revered the places where these trees grew as specially meaningful and full of energies. Today, several superstitions of the Canarian folklore are still refered to a dragon tree, growing lonely at the edge of a crag or a cliff.


When the traveler approaches the Canaries by sea, he can glimpse the misty form of the Teide floating over the clouds many miles before arriving at the islands. When we imagine how it looked when the volcano has been in eruption, we shall understand how the legend was born of a fierce fire-spewing dragon who watched over a wonderful Garden where the Golden Apples grew...
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« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2007, 09:24:08 pm »








dhill757

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                               THE GHOST ISLAND: SAN BORONDON (SAINT BRENDAN)





The Canaries are seven islands... but an eigth isle is still searched! It is the ghost island, the mysterious one, the island of San Borondón. San Borondón is the Canarian name of Saint Brendan or Saint Brandan of Clonfert (480-576 d.C.), an Irish monk who plays the lead in one of the most famous legends of the Celtic culture: the voyage of Saint Brendan or Brandan to the Promised Land of the Saints, the Islands of Happiness and Fortune.

The Irish poem tells that Brendan was a monk of Tralee, County Kerry. He was ordained priest in the year 512 d.C.. He sailed with 14 other monks on a small vessel which went far away in the Atlantic Ocean. The legend tells about their adventures, how they took with them along their voyage three other monks, their encounter with fire-hurling demons, with floating crystal columns, with monstruos creatures as large as an island.

Brendan and his fellow travellers landed on island where they found trees and other sort of vegetation. They said mass, and suddenly the island started to sail. It was a gigantic sea creature and they were on its back.
After many vicissitudes Brendan managed to go back to Ireland.

Many base on this legend the affirmation that Irish sailors reached possibly in the High Middle Ages the shores of North America or Newfoundland, Iceland and other Atlantic isles.


When the Canaries were conquered throughout the 15th century, stories were insistently told about an eigth island which sometimes was seen to the West of La Palma, El Hierro and La Gomera. When sailors tried to reach it and approached to its shores, mountains and valleys, the island was covered by mist and vanished. The island was obviously identified as mythical Saint Brendan's whale-island, and was called "San Borondón" in the Canary Islands. People believed firmly in its existence, and there were even detailed accounts from an odd sailor or two who swore that they had landed on the island and explored it before the land had sunk again into the Ocean. In some international treaties signed by the Kingdom of Castille it was stated, concerning the Canary Islands, the Castilian sovereignty over *the islands of Canaria, already discovered or to be discovered*; just in case... The island was called "Aprositus", the Inaccesible, and in other versions of the legend is named "Antilia" or "Island of the Seven Cities", cities which were supposed to have been founded by seven legendary bishops.

The archives of the 18th century inform about official inquiries by the authorities of El Hierro, where tens of witnesses declared having seen the bewitched island from the summits of El Hierro's mountains. An expedition in search of the island sailed from Santa Cruz de Tenerife as a result of this inquiry.

The persistence of this legend in the islands' folklore is amazing. San Borondón is still alive in the islands' people imagination. There is probably no one islander of Tenerife, La Palma, La Gomera or El Hierro who sometime has not looked from the mountains of his island into the sea, searching the lost island of San Borondón in the western horizon where the sun sinks in the cobalt-blue waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

"Let the Guanche drums resound
and the conch shells blow,
for the mysterious island
is appearing in the midst of the waves;
here comes San Borondón,
showing up in the mist
like a queen
with the surf as suite..."

"San Borondón", Cabrera/Santamaría


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The prior three posts come from this website:


http://home.pi.be/~p4u00071/canarias/canleyend-eng.html#Dark
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« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2007, 09:26:45 pm »








dhill757

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                                                 History of the Canary Islands





http://www.canaryislandbreaks.com/history.php

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Background





The origins of the Canary Islands are by no means clear, however we do know the islands are estimated to be 30 million years old. The Canarian archipelago is made up of seven islands and six islets, located approximately 100km off the coast of North Africa.

Legend has it the Canary Islands were formed when the mythical continent of Atlantis sank into the ocean. In Roman times Pliny referred to the islands as the "Fortunate Isles", a name that is still used today, due to the favourable winds and stable climate conditions. Information about the islands was lost in the dark ages, folklore has it that it was too dangerous for boats to venture into the Atlantic for fear of the "dragon infested waters".
 






Conquest





In 1402, Jean de Bethencourt of Normandy in France, left La Rochelle and headed towards the Canary Islands. He arrived first in Lanzarote, but later moved on to Fuerteventura. After running out of supplies and with very few men, he headed next for mainland Spain only to return to Fuerteventura in 1404. On returning to Fuerteventura, El Hierro and La Gomera came under his control. The Spanish King, Enrique III appointed him Lord of the islands and Bethencourt encouraged farmers from his Norman homeland to begin settling there.

During his time in Betancuria, Bethencourt built a chapel in the village which became an important local focal point. The chapel still stands today and continues to dominate the village. In 1406, Bethencourt left his nephew Maciot in charge and returned to Normandy. Although the islands suffered a turbulent history for centuries after, Bethancourt's establishment of the islands under Spanish control has remained permanent.






 

                                                      The Modern Canaries





The Canary Islands were declared a province of Spain in 1821, and Tenerife's Santa Cruz was made the capital. An unsuccessful division of the islands in the 1840's was attempted when feuds developed between Tenerife and Gran Canaria. It wasn't until 1927 when Madrid made the decision to officially separate the Canaries into two provinces. It remains the case today that Tenerife, La Gomera, La Palma and El Hierro make up one province while Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote make up the other.

The establishment of the Canary Islands as a major tourist destination can be attributed to Franco, who began to encourage tourism to the Spanish mainland in the late 1960's. This had a knock-on effect on the Canary Islands, which also gained popularity for their year-round good weather. Millions of holidaymakers now flock to the islands every year.
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« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2007, 09:30:13 pm »








dhill757

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Versión española



                                                      THE GUANCHES





The native people of the Island of Tenerife, which gave name to the different aboriginal peoples of the Canary Islands







                                          THE CANARY ISLANDS IN ANTIQUITY





A few - it would appear very few - sea explorers reached the Canary Islands during ancient times. The islands lie in the Atlantic Ocean, into which very few sailors dared to venture. Furthermore, the ocean current called "Canaries Stream" flows in a southwesterly direction before veering to the west to sweep the unwary ocean vessel off to the Caribbean. Centuries later, Europeans would make use of this current as a powerful aid in crossing the Ocean to reach America. (Cristopher Columbus called in at Gran Canaria and La Gomera, and set sail from this island during his voyage of discovery in 1492. The Canaries were the last land sighted by the Spaniards before landing in the island of Guanahani -San Salvador- on October 12, 1492; and Canarian water and provisions supplied the "Pinta", the "Niña" and the "Santa María").

Those few Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans who reached the islands and managed to return home to tell their story, surrounded the Canaries in a mist of magic and legend. For centuries, even after the Spanish conquest, it was believed that the islands were the uppermost peaks of the lost continent of Atlantis of which Plato wrote. Others identified them with the Elysian Fields, home to the blessed who knew no cold or pains. Similarly, the islands came to be identified with the Garden of Hesperydes, a paradise where golden apples grew under the guard of a gigantic flame-spewing monster (the Teide volcano?).

The Roman general Quintus Sertorius, whose ship was swept from Lusitania (Portugal) by a storm, speaks in the Ist century BC of "some islands higher than Mount Atlas with a gentle climate". Plutarch called the Canaries "the Fortunate Islands", a nickname with they still bear and which has given rise to the term "Macaronesia" (the Happy Islands) to refer to the archipelagos of the Azores, Canaries, Madeira, and Cape Verde in the Atlantic.

Juba, king of Mauritania in Northern Africa and vassal of Rome in the Ist century BC, sent an expedition out to explore the islands according to the writings of the famous naturalist Plinius.








                                        THE NATIVES OF THE CANARY ISLANDS






Europeans re-discovered the Fortunate islands in the first half of the XIVth century. They found living there a people who later came to be known as the Guanches, and who are still the object of great mystery.

Where did they come from? How did they reach the islands? When did they arrive?

They had to have arrived by sea, of course. And they arrived with their domesticated animals: goats, sheep, pigs and dogs. They brought with them wheat and barley. They came from North Africa, originating from the same stock as the Berbers of the Atlas mountains. Yet this simple affirmation has caused - and still causes - virtual rivers of ink to flow in polemical debate in which archeology and ethnography become entangled in politics.

According to the tales of the European conquerors, the Guanches were a "highly beautiful white race, tall, muscular, and with a great many blondes amongst their numbers" Their great height must be understood in relation to the average height of Europeans at that time. As for the presence of blondes, even today after many centuries of invasions and intermarriage, a heritage of blond hair and blue eyes is easily found among modern day Berbers of the Atlas region in Africa. There have of course been those who have tried to deny the Berber origins of the Guanches for political reasons, perhaps in order to avoid the possibility of potential territorial claims on the part of Morocco. But this reasoning is totally illogical. The ancestors of the current Moroccan and Algerian Berbers who emigrated to the Canaries did so several centuries before the birth of Christ when neither Morocco nor Algeria nor their cultures yet existed. According to the same line of argument, the Italians of Rome would have a stronger claim to the cities of Northern Africa which were founded by the Roman Empire!

The ancestors of the Guanches arrived by sea, colonized the islands... and then "forgot" how to sail! When the Europeans landed on the Canaries, they discovered a stone age culture based on shepherding, fruit gathering and a very limited agriculture. This same base was common to all the islands, but each island had developed into its own microcosm to the point where even the language had differentiated into distinct dialects. The islands were cut off one from the other as the natives did not know the art of navigation. They fished only in coastal tidal pools.

This is one of the great enigmas of the Guanches. How was it possible for a race of people to reach the shores of these tiny islands by sea, live surrounded by ocean with - on several islands - enormous forests of tall trees for raw material and yet ignore the sea, living as it were with their back turned to it? Several possible answers to this mystery have been offered. Perhaps the people of the Canaries were simple shepherds who had been transported to the islands by a sailing people and later forgotten and left to fate. Other explanations might be found in the extraordinary difficulty of navigating the oceans surrounding the Canaries due to the strong currents flowing to the West and the trade winds blowing as strongly almost year round.








                                     THE GUANCHES: THE PEOPLE FROM TENERIFE





Guanche was the name by which the natives of Tenerife called themselves. Guan Chenech meant "Man from Chenech", or man from Tenerife. With the passage of time, the term Guanche became identified with all the native peoples of the Canaries.





The names of the different islands and of their inhabitants (for those that are known) are as follows:


TENERIFE: Chenech, Chinech or Achinech. It would seem that the natives of La Palma, seeing the snow-covered peak of the Teide on the horizon, called that island Ten-er-efez, "White Mountain" (from Ten, teno, dun, duna= mountain, and er-efez= white). Achenech was inhabited by the Guan Chenech, the men from Chenech.


FUERTEVENTURA: Maxorata, inhabited by the Majoreros or Maxos.

GRAN CANARIA: Canaria, was inhabited by the Canarii or Canarios. All the islands took their name from this one, because the Castilians started to call them 'Islands of Canaria', later 'Islas Canarias' (Canary Islands).

LANZAROTE: Tyteroygatra.

LA PALMA: Benahoare, pronounced "Ben-Ajuar", and meaning "from the tribe of Ahoare" (tribe of the African Atlas). Island inhabited by the Auaritas.

LA GOMERA: Gomera, inhabited by the Gomeros.

EL HIERRO: Hero, inhabited by the Bimbaches.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://home.pi.be/~p4u00071/canarias/canguan1-eng.html





Another great link on the Canary Islands:



http://www.red2000.com/spain/canarias/
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« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2007, 09:33:24 pm »








dhill757

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                                              The Mysterious origin of the Guanches





The Guanches are the mysterious natives of the Canary Islands. They were just about exterminated by the Spaniards when these invaded the archipelago at the turn of the 15th century. Tall, blond and blue-eyed, the Guanches have long intrigued the anthropologists, for blond natives are rarity. According to the reliable Encyclopaedia Britannica, the Guanches "are thought to have been of Cro-Magnon origin... and had a brown complexion, blue or gray eyes, and blondish hair"


Indeed, the Guanches are deemed to be related to the Berbers of neighboring Morroco, who are, likewise, tall, blond and blue-eyed when unmixed with the Arab majority. Other specialists, however, believe that the Guanches are related to the Celts of Western Europe, the early realm of these races. No matter what, the Guanches represent a unique opportunity of studying the early peoples of this region so intimately connected with Atlantis and the Garden of the Hesperides.


Isolated in their islands, the Guanches were prevented, until the advent of the Spanish, from sexually mingling with other races. So, they preserved their pristine Cro-Magnon genetic traits in a more or less pure fashion until that date. But, as we said, the Guanches were massacred by the Spaniards, and their remainder mingled heavily with the invaders, so that they essentially inexist today. But the blond, blue-eyed, tall stock has been preserved in part, and can still be seen in many individuals. As is known, blond traits are dominated by dark ones, and tend to disappear from the population. But they survive unseen, and may return in certain individuals called "recessives", who combine the proper genes.


Furthermore, the Guanches mummified their dead, and this material can be studied by the researchers, particularly concerning traits such as blood type and racial characteristics. This strange mode of disposing of the dead - which the Guanches shared with the Polynesians, the Egyptians and the Mayas - has been mooted out by several authorities as indicating a close affinity among these distant nations. The Guanches also left some sort of alphabetic inscriptions which have yet to be studied, along with their pottery and peculiar ruins. All in all, the archaeology of this most remarkable people is far from satisfactorily researched.


Many researchers have pointed out the resemblance of the Guanche natives with the Cro-Magnons and, particularly, with Cro-Magnoid types of regions such as those of Muges (Portugal) dating from the Mesolithic (c. 8,000 BC). Similar groups have been noted and studied Portugal, Spain, France, England, Sweden and Northwest Africa, precisely the realm of the Celto-Germanic and the Berber races.







                                   Are the Canaries the Remains of Sunken Atlantis?





Many Atlantologists have proposed that the Canary Islands are the remainder of a sunken Atlantis, being the lofty volcanic peaks left behind when the lost continent foundered. However, the Canary islands rise directly from the deep ocean floor, from a depth of some 3,000 meters below the surface. Indeed, they are a part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, having been formed by submarine volcanoes at the end of the Tertiary Age (circa 2.5 million years ago).Their lavas consist of basalts and trachytes, the typical material of submarine, non-explosive volcanism typical of seabottoms.


Due to both their age and their origin, the Canarian volcanoes can hardly be invoked to account for the conflagration that wiped Atlantis off the map. Instead, this type of basaltic, submarine volcanism is nowadays perfectly well understood geologically speaking. Such volcanoes result from the upwelling magma that forms the Continental Plates, according to the theory of Plate Tectonics, and are a feature of all oceanic regions of the world. Hence, the claims made by certain Atlantologists such as P. Termier, I. Donnelly, C. Berlitz and many others that the Canaries or the Azores, or the Madeiras are the remains of sunken Atlantis do not hold water at all.







                                       Are the Guanches Atlantean Relicts?





As we said above, though we can be certain that the Canaries, along with the other neighboring Atlantic islands, are not the residues of a sunken continent that foundered in the region, we have yet to explain the mysterious origin of the Guanches. However, where smoke is, there is usually fire, and we cannot simply ignore the recurrent legends that link this people to Atlantis.


But if they are not Atlanteans left behind when their continent sunk, the only possible explanation for the mysterious origin of the Guanches is that they primordially came from somewhere else. But, whence? Certainly not from neighboring Africa, the realm of the Black Man. No serious anthropologist has ever maintained that the blond Aryans originated in Africa itself. The standing proposals for the origin of the Berbers and, possibly, the Guanches themselves, are that they came from Arabia, after crossing the Sahara desert.


But, to start with, no one is sure that the Arabs or, even less, the Aryans, originated in Arabia or Palestine, and their own ethiological legends affirm that they came from beyond the Indian Ocean. Moreover, the Sahara desert poses a formidable barrier ever since the end of the Pleistocene, and it is highly unlikely that it could be crossed by hordes of migrants, unstocked with the food and water required for the task.


The Guanches were held in perfect isolation from Europe and other Old World civilizations until they were discovered by the Portuguese and Spanish at the end of the 15th century. This separation dates from prehistoric times that far predate the ones of Plato and Herodotus, and even those of Homer and Hesiod. So, if Guanche legends indeed relate to Atlantis and its doom, we can be certain that the golden realm was no idle invention of Plato or other Greeks, but originated in a very ancient tradition, dating from the dawn of mankind. This is precisely what we aim to prove in the present work on the origin of the Guanches.


We start by reviewing the ancient traditions linking the Canaries to the Garden of the Hesperides and the Islands of the Blest, and progress into the modern proposals purporting to show that the Canaries and the other neighboring islands are the remains of sunken Atlantis. Finally, we attempt showing their rather direct relationship between the Canaries, Atlantis and the Garden of Eden, the legendary site of the origin of Mankind.


If our conclusions indeed prove to be right and survive the wellcome attack of the critics, the whole of human prehistory will have to undergo a major revision. Hence, the importance of inquiring on the origin of the Guanches and their possible connection with Atlantis. The mysterious Guanches provide the key to the riddles that surround the origin of Mankind, and are the "missing link" connecting the Mediterranean and other neighboring civilizations to the Far Orient and the Indies, the true site of the Garden of the Hesperides. This garden, also known as that of Eden, is the place where Mankind and Civilization indeed developed, according to the holy traditions of many nations, and not only that of the Bible.   







                                                   Evening Isles Fantastical 





Classical writers often mention legendary islands in the Atlantic Ocean in a way that closely evokes the legends of Atlantis. Homer mentions islands like Phaeacia, Scheria and Ogygia. The Argonautica, deemed to be prior to Homer's Odyssey, also speaks of legendary oceanic islands such as Aiaia, Thrinacia and Colchis. More than just delightful novels, these ancient sagas were indeed Sacred History, and were believed to derive from actual fact. The Greco-Roman traditions concerning the fabulous oceanic islands and their golden realms apparently derive from the far earlier ones such as the Epic of Gilgamesh of the Sumero-Babylonians or the Ramayana and the Mahabharata of the Hindus.


Many other classical authors also mention such fantastic islands of the ocean. This ocean the Greeks, ignorant of the other oceans, very naturally identified with what we nowadays call by the name of Atlantic Ocean, that is, "the Ocean of the Atlanteans". But when we read the ancient traditions closer, we notice that the fabulous islands of the Atlanteans were always placed "at the confines of the earth".


Moreover, the ocean in question is invariably described as "winy red" and is placed towards dawn and Orient. In other words, the ocean in question is the Indian Ocean, which the ancients called Erythraean, that is, "Red One". And Atlantis is the same as the Ultima Thule of the ancients, this being the name they gave to the "confines of the earth" which lay towards the Orient, in the Eastern limits of their world, and where they also placed the Pillars of Atlas, the twin and counterpart of the western Pillars of Hercules, in Gibraltar.


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http://istina.rin.ru/eng/ufo/text/243.html
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« Reply #26 on: December 21, 2007, 09:35:11 pm »








dhill757

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A great link on the rock art of Ireland & the Canary Islands!


http://www.irishmegaliths.org.uk/seanchlocha6.htm
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« Reply #27 on: December 21, 2007, 09:36:38 pm »








dhill757

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The Cape Verde Islands are half-way between Machupicchu and the Great Pyramid, fifty miles north of the line of ancient sites. These islands are also half-way between Easter Island and the Indus Valley. When the Cape Verde Islands were rediscovered by European mariners in 1460 they were found to be uninhabited. However, islands in this location are found on earlier maps and described as inhabited in ancient times.

The Mecia de Viladestes map of 1413 shows islands at this location labeled Gades. The information in this map is thought to have come from Roman sources dating back to the first century AD. The Discoveries of the World from their first originall unto the yeere of our Lord 1555, written by Antonio Galvao in 1563, lists the ancient names for the Cape Verde Islands as the Dorcades, Hesperides and the Gorgades. A 1587 map by Richard Hakluyt also labels the Cape Verde Islands as the Gorgades and the Hesperides.

In ancient Greek Mythology, the Island of Atlantis was given to Poseidon. Atlas was Poseidon's son and the first king of Atlantis. The seven daughters of Atlas were known as the Atlantides. Because their mother was named Hesperis, they were also known as the Hesperides.



http://home.hiwaay.net/~jalison/capev.html
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« Reply #28 on: December 21, 2007, 09:37:47 pm »








dhill757

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These are some awesome shots of Gibraltar, which the Atlantean navy would have had to pass through in order to invade the Mediterranean, the "Pillars of Hercules."



http://www.geocities.com/player2000gi/gibraltar.htm http://www3.sympatico.ca/pjdavis/gibraltar.htm


http://www.munnwerks.com/spain99/gibraltar.html 
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« Reply #29 on: December 21, 2007, 09:41:20 pm »








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http://www.maltastar.com/pages/msDossierDetailN.asp?id=10483&po=2

quote:
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                                                   Why Did The Med Dry Up?





25 June 2003 - Prof Victor Axiak*

Last week we had a collective dry nightmare of the Mediterranean Sea drying up. We saw how the stretch between Malta and Sicily was turned into a dusty plateau, with the occasional deep valley cutting through it. We also saw how both the Eastern and Western basins of this sea tuned into deep holes with vast expanses of salt flats alternating with occasional mountains. The climate within these dried up basins was very harsh and not many animal and plant forms were able to survive. On the other hand, the surrounding climate of the region is cooler and drier as an important moisture source disappeared.





The problem with this nightmare/dream is that it DID happen.



Why?

How?



The first real indication of this cataclysmic past event came to light in 1970 when an international group of scientists started drilling the Mediterranean seafloor. Strange things started turning up in core samples: layers of microscopic plants and soil sandwiched between huge beds of salt more than two kilometres below today's sea level. The plants had grown in sunlight. Could the seafloor once have been near a shoreline? Or did the sea ever evaporated, leaving behind massive deposits of salts and what was once the sea floor, exposed to air! Eventually, most scientists agreed with the latter proposition: The Med did dry up. What’s more fantastic about this idea is that this sea probably dried up, only to be refilled with seawater more than once!

As we all know, the Mediterranean sea is exposed to intense sunlight which evaporates huge volumes of seawater. In fact, in spite of being replenished by a number of rivers which flow in it, some scientists have estimated that the sea level of our sea should go down by one metre every year, due to this water loss. So what stops this from happening? Well, this does not happen thanks to the Straits of Gibraltar through which water from the Atlantic is flowing in to compensate for the water loss due to the evaporation by the sun.

 
As the last Atlantic waters dripped over into the Mediterranean, this body of water began to become a hypersaline lake as evaporation exceeded precipitation and it eventually dried up (PICTURE 2). Prior to completely drying up, there could have been smaller hypersaline lakes, in which little or no marine life survived. As such lakes eventually evaporated as well, they left behind them thick deposits of salts. And these salt deposits were one of the first clues which suggested the possibility that our sea dried up, millions of years ago. Some remnants of these salt deposits today form salt mines which are commercially exploited (PICTURE 3)
 
About 5.3 million years ago, a small breach in the Gibraltar dam sent the process into reverse. Ocean water gushed out cutting a tiny channel to the Mediterranean. As the channel enlarged, the water flowed faster and faster, until the torrent ripped through the emerging Strait of Gibraltar at more than 100 knots. That must have been quite a sight (PICTURE 4)!

Eventually, the rising waters drowned the falls and warm Mediterranean water began to escape to the Atlantic, reheating the oceans and the planet. The salinity crisis ended about 5.3 million years ago. It had lasted roughly 600 000 years.
 
Incidentally, the pictures shown in the present contribution should not be taken literally or as being accurate enough. For example, it is quite likely that a few million years ago, the morphology of the Mediterranean was quite unlike that of today! However these pictures do give us a rough idea of what happened.

Can this event happen again? Yes. It is not unlikely that future continental drift will push the African continent closer to Europe sealing off the Straits of Gibraltar yet again.

Can it happen in our lifetime?

Certainly not.

These events are of a geological nature and therefore normally take place at VERY SLOW rates. So, it is quite likely that the human species will not be around to witness a repeat performance of this event.

What a pity!
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