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(V.) HISTORY - Pervasive Planets

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Author Topic: (V.) HISTORY - Pervasive Planets  (Read 411 times)
Bianca
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« on: December 11, 2007, 02:14:10 pm »










S. Severus seems to have been almost manic in his acceptance of any astrological prediction made with sufficient assurance, although the stoical attitude of some of his predecessors was entirely absent in him, and he evidently believed that if he intervened with determination in the planetary plan, he could depend on some mitigation of astrological prophesy. For instance, he executed numerous people - including several of his friends - on the grounds that they had consulted astrologers to discover the best time at which to assassinate him.

Severus is said to have left Rome for Britain in the knowledge that he would not survive the campaign there. Caracalla, having murdered his younger brother Geta, for safety's sake, seems to have had the same total belief in astrology as his father. Astrologer after astrologer was summoned to advise him, and several of them - an Egyptian called Serapio, one called Ascletion, and Larginus Proculus-told the Emperor that he would not live long, and that his successor would be Macrinus, a prefect. Ascletion was executed, Larginus Proculus was promised execution immediately after the date on which he had said Caracalla would die, and Serapio was thrown to a lion (which simply licked his hand, so a more prosaic execution had to be arranged)
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Nevertheless, Caracalla was murdered, and for the next several decades astrology took a less prominent part in imperial manoeuverings.

Neither Opellus Macrinus, who reigned only for a year, nor Elagabalus, a demented young man who took the name of his Sun god and was slaughtered when he was 18 by his praetorian guard, contributed anything to its history; and Severus Alexander, who reigned between 222 and 235, was said to be an astrologer but did not use the skill ostentatiously.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2007, 11:09:27 pm by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.


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