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Auguste Rodin

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Dru
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« on: March 12, 2007, 11:19:56 pm »



"The Thinker" original sculpture at the Musée Rodin in Paris.
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Dru
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2007, 11:22:14 pm »



Auguste Rodin

Auguste Rodin (born François Auguste René Rodin; November 12, 1840 – November 17, 1917) was a French artist, most famous as a sculptor, but also a painter and printmaker. He was the preeminent French sculptor of his time, and remains one of the few sculptors with broad name recognition outside the visual arts community. Sculpturally, he possessed a unique ability to organize a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed clay surface.

In late nineteenth-century Paris, Rodin played a pivotal role in redefining sculpture. The predominant figure sculpture tradition of the time required an almost formulaic approach, and most sculpture was either decorative or highly thematic. Rodin's most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modelled the human body with high realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Although Rodin is considered the progenitor of modern sculpture,[1] he did not set out to rebel against tradition. He was schooled traditionally in Paris's École des Beaux-Arts system, and desired academic recognition.[2]

Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime, from the surprising realism of his first major figure, The Age of Bronze, to the unconventional memorials whose commissions he later sought. Rodin was sensitive to the controversy, but did not change his style, and successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community. By 1900, Rodin was a world-renowned artist. Wealthy private clients sought his work, and he kept company with a variety of high-profile intellectuals and artists. His sculpture suffered a decline in popularity after his death in 1917, but within a few decades his legacy solidified: he was the man who revitalized sculpture after centuries of stasis.

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Dru
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2007, 11:24:09 pm »



The Age of Bronze (L'age d'airain) is a bronze statue by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. The figure is of a life-size **** male. When first exhibited at the 1877 Salon in Paris, Rodin was criticized for having made the statue by casting a living model, a false charge that was vigorously denied. This charge actually benefited Rodin though, because people were so eager to see this for themselves. Copies of the Age of Bronze can be found in several museums around the world, including the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.
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Dru
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2007, 11:27:36 pm »



The Gates of Hell, Musée Rodin.
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2007, 11:30:54 pm »



The Kiss

The Kiss is a marble sculpture by the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Like many of Rodin's best-known individual sculptures, including The Thinker, the embracing couple depicted in the sculpture appeared originally as part of a group of reliefs decorating Rodin's monumental bronze portal The Gates of Hell, commissioned for a planned museum of art in Paris. The couple were later removed from the Gates and replaced with another pair of lovers located on the smaller right-hand column.

The sculpture was originally titled Francesca da Rimini, as it depicts the 13th-century Italian noblewoman immortalised in Dante's Inferno (Circle 2, Canto 5) who falls in love with her husband Giovanni Malatesta's younger brother Paolo. Having fallen in love while reading the story of Lancelot and Guinevere, the couple are discovered and killed by Francesca's husband. In the sculpture, the book can be seen in Paolo's hand. The lovers lips do not actually touch in the sculpture to suggest that they were interrupted and met their demise without their lips ever having touched.

When critics first saw the sculpture in 1887, they suggested the less specific title Le Baiser (The Kiss).

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Dru
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2007, 11:34:41 pm »

Homage to women

Rodin indicated that his approach to sculpting women was of homage to them and their bodies, not just submitting to men but as full partners in ardor. The consequent eroticism in the sculpture made it controversial. A bronze version of The Kiss (74 cm high) was sent for display at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The sculpture was considered unsuitable for general display and relegated to an inner chamber with admission only by personal application.


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Dru
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2007, 11:38:22 pm »

The Kiss  The Kiss
1888 - 1889
marble
181,5 x 112,3 x 117 cm
S.1002
Photo : E. & P. Hesmerg

While visiting the second circle in Hell, Virgil and Dante saw, among those who had committed sins of the flesh, Paolo and Francesca, two personages who had really lived in the Middle Ages in Italy. Around 1275, Francesca, the daughter of Guido da Polenta, married Gianciotto Malatesta, Lord of Rimini, who entrusted her in the care of his brother, the handsome young Paolo. Paolo and Francesca fell in love with each other while reading romances of courtly love. As soon as they exchanged their first kiss, Gianciotto caught them by surprise and stabbed them. "Love has led us to a unique death" Dante makes their shades say. This forbidden love and its consequent eternal damnation, was a favourite theme among 19th century artists, from Ingres to Delacroix, and from Ary Scheffer to Cabanel and Henri Martin.
Rodin portrayed the famous lovers at the very instant they became aware of their feelings. He placed them in the centre of the left leaf of The Gates of Hell. This group was still in place at the beginning of 1886 but was removed shortly afterwards, probably because it portrayed a state of pure happiness which did not fit in with the theme of the composition. It was exhibited in Paris, then in Brussels in 1887, when it was given the title of The Kiss by critics who were surprised at the lack of costume or decorative details referring directly to Paolo and Francesca. Rodin had already rejected the easy solution of picturesque, litterary or mythological subjects which, by distracting the viewer, weakened the emotion that should be felt when contemplating a sculpture.


http://www.musee-rodin.fr/senf2-e.htm#baiser-e
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Dru
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« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2007, 11:43:25 pm »

La Scultura Mondiale - Rodin Auguste

http://www.scultura-italiana.com/Galleria_estero/Rodin%20Auguste/index.html
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Tom Hebert
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2007, 06:33:36 am »

I have always enjoyed the Burghers of Calais, wondering what each man was thinking.

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