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WALDSEEMULLER Map That Named America Is A Puzzle For Researchers

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Author Topic: WALDSEEMULLER Map That Named America Is A Puzzle For Researchers  (Read 4814 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2007, 03:57:23 am »








Panel 4 



 
 Cathay and Zipanga


This fourth plate describes Cathay and Japan. The rivers and mountains of Cathay are portrayed here as they were when mapped by Marco Polo at the end of the 13th century. Neither Columbus nor Vespucci reached this part of the globe and Waldseemuller relied on Ptolemy's map for information to describe these parts.

The intrepid explorers were attempting to reach Cathay for the riches and spices they were promised according to legend. Marco Polo had described an exotic culture with cities of rare qualities and lots of gold.

When Columbus arrived in Hispaniola in 1492, he believed he was coming up on the coast of India, hence the name Indians arrived to the Americas.





The Latin legend states:


In describing the general appearance of the world, it has seemed best to put down the discoveries of the ancients, and to add what has since been discovered by the moderns, for instance, the land of Cathay, so that those who are interested in such matters and wish to find out various things, may gain their wishes and be grateful to us for our labor, when they see nearly everything that has been discovered here and there, or recently explored, carefully and clearly brought together, so as to be seen at a glance.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 03:59:04 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2007, 04:00:26 am »








Panel 5 
 



 Southern New World


This plate shows the vast ocean west of Africa including the islands off the African cost the jumping off point to the new world. Farther west we get a first glimpse of the new lands discovered after Columbus and Vespucci made their first and second journeys into the western seas.

It appears that Waldseemuller borrowed from the coastline used in the Caveri map* for his depiction of the new coastline of the discovered land about which Vespucci had obviously great knowledge. He, like Columbus, was convinced that they were headed for Cathay and he fully believed that by sailing south and around the southern tip they would arrive in India, with its wealth of spice riches.

It was while he was exploring south along the Brazilian coast that Vespucci made the calculation that convinced him that there was another large body of water out west and that Ptolemy's map was too constricted. He calculated the circumference of the earth to within a few miles accuracy, by comparing some figures that he had in his possession for Italy to measurements he made while at the mouth of the Orinoco River.

There are many interesting geographical features and item of great importance historically. The Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn are clearly shown. So too is a curious tropical bird, probably a parrot, borrowed form Vespucci's description the flora and fauna in his book Mundus Novus (New World). There are numerous rivers mapped flowing eastward into the Mare Oceanum, but as in the earlier plate of the northern new land, Waldseemuller depicts the western coastal lands as being a continuous mountain chain.



Spagnola Insula - The island of Little Spain (Hispaniola)



Terra Ultra Incognita - Unknown Land



Tota Insta Provincia Inventa est per Mandatum Regis Castelle - All this province was discovered under the direction of the king of Castille.





Two legends appear on this section of the map.


- These islands were discovered by Columbus, an admiral of Genoa, at the command of the King of Spain.

- All this is sweet water (at the mouth of the Orinoco River).


*  SEE :  http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,5292.msg47495.html#msg47495
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:36:35 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #17 on: December 05, 2007, 04:03:55 am »








Panel 6 
 



 Old Europe


Waldseemuller borrowed heavily once more from Ptolemy for this region of his new world map. His geographical knowledge was well established between the Atlas Mountains in North Africa and Constantinople in the eastern Mediterranean. There had been ample trade in all regions of this plate for many hundreds of years.

We can easily discern the Scandinavian lands, Ireland, Britain and mainland Europe. Italy (with the Eagle of the Roman Empire) and the Adriatic Sea are skewed rather dramatically eastward and the Bosphorus is clearly marked into the Black Sea.

It is interesting to note the scant information about interior Africa. There are several large rivers that appear to flow from the middle of the Sahara desert. Ethiopia, Egypt and Arabia are marked in the east, as is Libya, though further west.

The closing of the trade routes through Constantinople after 1453 was one of the main reasons for the sudden interest in exploring new routes to the west across an inhospitable sea.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:05:00 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2007, 04:06:04 am »








Panel 7 



 
 East of the Urals



Marco Polo had made extensive travels into the Russian world east of the Ural Mountains and Ptolemy incorporated them into his world map. Waldseemuller also drew heavily from the known information regarding rivers, mountains and cities in this distant region of the world.

South of the Mare Glaciale (Arctic Sea) and the Tropic of Cancer lies the northern coast of Asia. The Ural Mountains are depicted as an obvious barrier between the Tartars who inhabit the land to the west and the Scithians who reside to the east.

The Ganges River is clearly marked flowing south from the Himalayas into India and it is obvious that there is much knowledge about this region of the world as well.

India was a major supplier of spices to European homes by this time and it became necessary to find a new route way to India to maintain the supply.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:07:07 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2007, 04:08:10 am »








Panel 8 



 
 India - Rich in Spices



This plate shows the large island of Java and the eastern coast of what is referred to as India. This is where Columbus and Vespucci thought they were when they arrived at Hispanola during their first journey in 1492 and mistakenly gave the name Indians to the inhabitants they found. The province of Tibet is highlighted at the top of the plate. The tropic of cancer and the equator show here as well. This region is the source of the silk, pepper and other valuable spices that they were seeking when they set out from Portugal.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:09:14 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2007, 04:10:17 am »








Panel 9 



 
 America


This plate is the southern extension of the new land. Vespucci explored down as far as the river plate but when his ships became riddled with toredos he had to abandon his quest and return. Consequently, Waldseemuller drew the map into the bottom of the margin since he didn't know what lay south. Interestingly enough, some rivers are drawn on the margin. What's more, he mapped the western coast of the new land with a continuous range of mountains. The Tropic of Capricorn passes through what has become on of the most famous and controversial additions to a map since Ptolemy's first map. The name America shows up for the first time south of modern day Brazil. The word was attributed to Vespucci and the name was later picked up by Mercater who transferred the name to the north as North America and to the south as South America.





The Latin translation reads:


A general delineation of the various lands and islands, including some of which the ancients make no mention, discovered lately between 1497 and 1504 in four voyages over the seas, two by Fernando of Castile, and two by Manuel of Portugal, most serene monarchs, with Amerigo Vespucci as one of the navigators and officers of the fleet; and especially a delineation of many places hitherto unknown. All this we have carefully drawn on the map, to furnish true and precise geographical knowledge.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:11:30 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2007, 04:12:34 am »








Panel 10 
 



 Africa


Africa is one of the most colorful additions to Waldsemuller's map. The interior of Africa, which was not yet explored, is embellished with a graphic of an elephant and a small group of Indigenous native tribesmen. Several rivers including the Nile and many inland lakes are marked. The Ivory Coast and the West African coast are well explored. The Cape and the Eastern coast are less so.

Crossing the equator to explore the hitherto forbidden regions along the African coast was gradually acomplished by the Portuguese. They were strategically located on the western edge of Europe and were first to explore many regions on the African coastline. There was a theory that one could sail round the tip of Africa to arrive at Indian spices.

In 1488, a Portuguese ship commanded by Bartolomeu Dias was first to round the Cape of Good Hope and continue through to the Indian Ocean.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:13:41 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2007, 04:14:54 am »








Panel 11 
 



 Madagascar and the Indian Ocean



In this plate, the islands of Madagascar and Ceylon comprise the main features. The miscalculations concerning India and the Malaysian Peninsula leave this section rather sparse. The Latin text describes Madagascar. Included also are the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2007, 04:15:52 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2007, 04:16:55 am »








 Panel 12 




 
 Malayasia




This plate includes the small island of Java Minor and the mainland tip of what they refer to as India. The Spice Islands of Indonesia are variously represented but the main import of this plate is contained in the Latin legend below. Here Waldsemuller attributes the naming of America to Amerigo Vespucci. Earlier he had referred to deriving the word America from Americus to coincide with the feminine use of the words Europa and Asia.

The margins of the map are delicately festooned with colorful figures and cartouches denoting wind, sea and sky. These bear such names as Zephir, Africus, Lybonoth, Eronotus, Witurn-evrus, Subsolanus, Cecias, and Chor.




The Latin translation reads:


Although many of the ancients were interested in marking out the circle of the land, things remained unknown to them in no slight degree; for instance, in the west, America, named after its discoverer, which is to be reckoned a fourth part of the world. Another is, to the south, a part of Africa, which begins about seven degrees this side of Capricornus and stretches in a broad expanse to the south, beyond the torrid zone and the Tropic of Capricornus. A third instance, in the east, is the land of Cathay, and all of southern India beyond 180 degrees of longitude. All these we have added to the earlier known places, so that those who are fond of things of this sort may gaze upon all that is known to us of the present day, and may approve of our painstaking labors. This one request we have to make, that those who are inexperienced and unacquainted with cosmography shall not condemn all this before they have learned that it will surely be clearer to them later on, when they have come to understand it.


http://www.educarepress.com/images/Waldsee/map_1.html
« Last Edit: December 08, 2007, 07:38:31 am by Bianca2001 » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #24 on: June 07, 2008, 01:28:30 pm »


Panel 10  Africa
There was a theory that one could sail round the tip of Africa to arrive at Indian spices.
In 1488, a Portuguese ship commanded by Bartolomeu Dias was first to round the Cape of Good Hope and continue through to the Indian Ocean.
.
.
Dear....................BIANCA,


I see many pixel-rastered small copies of Facsimile maps of ancient Arabia,
Which smaller captions are unreadible, and I am not an internet-Shop- Facsimile Map-collector.
is there no way to enlarge the Picture from this pannel " Original"?     Cry   Cry   Cry 
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( Blue's)THEORY, locating"original" Atlantis( in Aden-Yemen.)
1: ATLANTIS =Fake=Latin name, original Greek: ATHE(=a Region in Aden)
2: Atlantic-OCEAN=Greek: RIVER-of-Atlas+also" Known "World-OCEAN(=Red-Sea)
3: Greek-obsolete-Numeral 'X' caused Plato's Atlantisdate:9000=900
Bianca
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« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2008, 03:15:08 pm »



No, Blue


This was a blown-up portion from the big map.

I do have a suggestion, though.  Here in the USA we have some shops that have copying
machines (Xerox, I believe), where you can take any print and they will enlarge it for you.
They can also do that with any particular part of your print, not just the whole thing.

It only costs a few pennies each copy.

Do you have such places in Holland?  I hope so.....
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BlueHue
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« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2009, 09:21:39 am »

Sorry,   BIANCA,

I still can't read this small print,

When  I enlarged it further,  the lettering becomes blurred
the Copyright holder from which you copied this ' Print '
has no Shop-outlett in Holland.  So I can't shop for the original facsimile in Holland.


Panel 10  Africa
There was a theory that one could sail round the tip of Africa to arrive at Indian spices.
In 1488, a Portuguese ship commanded by Bartolomeu Diaz, was first to round the Cape of Good Hope
and continued, through to the Indian Ocean. [/quote]
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( Blue's)THEORY, locating"original" Atlantis( in Aden-Yemen.)
1: ATLANTIS =Fake=Latin name, original Greek: ATHE(=a Region in Aden)
2: Atlantic-OCEAN=Greek: RIVER-of-Atlas+also" Known "World-OCEAN(=Red-Sea)
3: Greek-obsolete-Numeral 'X' caused Plato's Atlantisdate:9000=900
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