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Castles of Scotland

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Boudica
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« Reply #60 on: May 04, 2009, 01:19:47 pm »

Glenbuchat Castle

Glenbuchat Castle is an historic Z plan Scottish castle built in 1590 for John Gordon[1] of Cairnbarrow to mark his wedding. It is located above the River Don, near Kildrummy, Aberdeenshire. The building is roofless, but otherwise in fairly good repair.

The family sold the castle in 1738, and it remained in private hands until Colonel James Barclay Milne, whose grandfather James W. Barclay bought the castle in 1901, placed it in state care in 1946. A local club purchased the surrounding parkland in 1948 and gifted it to the state to ensure that the castle's surroundings would remain intact. Both the castle and the surrounding land are now managed by Historic Scotland.

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Boudica
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« Reply #61 on: May 04, 2009, 01:20:16 pm »



Glenbuchat Castle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland
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« Reply #62 on: May 04, 2009, 01:21:39 pm »

Huntly Castle

Huntly Castle is a ruined castle in Huntly in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It was the ancestral home of the chief of Clan Gordon, Earl of Huntly.

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Boudica
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« Reply #63 on: May 04, 2009, 01:22:17 pm »



Huntly Castle
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« Reply #64 on: May 04, 2009, 01:22:35 pm »

Architecturally the L plan castle consists of a well-preserved five-story tower with an adjoining great hall and supporting buildings. Areas of the original ornate facade and interior stonework remain. A mound in the grounds of the castle is all that remains of an earlier 12th century motte. Originally named Strathbogie, the castle was granted to Sir Adam Gordon of Huntly in the 14th century. King Robert the Bruce was a guest of the castle in 1307 prior to his defeat of the Earl of Buchan.

It was fired in 1452 by the Earl of Moray then extensively rebuilt by the first Earl of Huntly. In 1449 the king was at war with the powerful Earls of Douglas. The Gordons stood on the king’s side and, with their men involved in the south of the country, the Earl of Moray, a relation and ally of the Douglases, took the opportunity to sack the Gordon lands, setting Huntly Castle ablaze. The Gordons returned and quickly destroyed their enemies. Although the castle was burned to the ground, a grander castle was built in its place. In 1496, the pretender to the English throne Perkin Warbeck was married to Catherine Gordon at Huntly Castle, an act witnessed by King James IV of Scotland.

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« Reply #65 on: May 04, 2009, 01:23:02 pm »

Wings were added to the castle in the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1640 it was occupied by the Scottish Covenantor army under Major-General Robert Monro (d. 1680). The parson of Rothiemay tells us how the house ‘was preserved from being rifled or defaced, except some emblems and imagerye, which looked somewhat popish and superstitious lycke; and therefore, by the industry of one captain James Wallace (one of Munro’s foote captaines) were hewd and brocke doune off the frontispiece of the house; but all the rest of the frontispiece containing Huntly’s scutcheon, etc, was left untouched, as it stands to this daye’.

Captured in October, 1644, the castle was briefly held by James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose against the Duke of Argyll. In 1647 it was gallantly defended against General David Leslie by Lord Charles Gordon, but its 'Irish' garrison was starved into surrender. Savage treatment was meted out, for the men were hanged and their officers beheaded. In December of the same year Huntly himself was captured and on his way to execution at Edinburgh was detained, by a refinement of cruelty, in his own mansion. His escort were shot against its walls. In 1650 Charles II visited briefly on his way to the Battle of Worcester, defeat and exile. The Civil War brought an end to the Gordon of Huntly family's long occupation of the castle.

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« Reply #66 on: May 04, 2009, 01:23:14 pm »

In the early eighteenth century it was already in decay and providing material for predatory house builders in the village. In 1746, during the Jacobite Risings, it was occupied by British Government troops. Thereafter, it became a common quarry until a groundswell of antiquarian sentiment in the 19th Century came to the rescue of the noble pile.

Huntly Castle remained under the ownership of the Clan Gordon until 1923. Today, the remains of the castle are cared for by Historic Scotland.

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« Reply #67 on: May 04, 2009, 01:23:43 pm »



Carved inscriptions feature on the facade
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« Reply #68 on: May 04, 2009, 01:24:38 pm »



Huntly Castle (Aberdeenshire, Scotland)
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« Reply #69 on: May 04, 2009, 01:25:20 pm »



Huntly Castle (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - frontispiece
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Boudica
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« Reply #70 on: May 04, 2009, 01:25:55 pm »



Huntly Castle (Aberdeenshire, Scotland) - detail fireplace in great chamber of marchioness
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« Reply #71 on: May 04, 2009, 01:27:08 pm »

Kildrummy Castle

Kildrummy Castle is a ruined castle near Kildrummy, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, United Kingdom. Though ruined, it is one of the most extensive castles of 12th century date to survive in eastern Scotland, and was the seat of the Earls of Mar.

Dating from as early as the 12th century,[1] the castle is believed to have been constructed during the lordships of Uilleam and Domhnall, Earls of Mar. It has been posited that siting of Kildrummy Castle was influenced by the location of the Grampian Mounth trackway crossings, particularly the Elsick Mounth and Cryne Corse Mounth.[2] Kildrummy Castle underwent siege numerous times in its history, first in defence of the family of Robert the Bruce in August-September 1306 (leading to the horrible deaths and executions of Nigel Bruce and many other brave Scots), and again in 1335 by David of Strathbogie. On this occasion Christina Bruce held off the attackers until her husband Sir Andrew Moray came to her rescue.

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« Reply #72 on: May 04, 2009, 01:27:44 pm »



Kildrummy Castle
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« Reply #73 on: May 04, 2009, 01:27:59 pm »

In 1374 the castle's heiress Isobel was seized and married by Alexander Stewart, who then laid claim to Kildrummy and the title of Earl of Mar. In 1435 it was taken over by James I, becoming a royal castle until being granted to Lord Elphinstone in 1507.

The castle passed from the Clan Elphinstone to the Clan Erskine before being abandoned in 1716 following the failure of the Jacobite rebellion.

Kildrummy Castle is "shield-shaped" in plan with a number of independent towers. The flat side of the castle overlooks a steep ravine; moreover, on the opposite side of the castle the walls come to a point, which was once defended by a massive twin-towered gatehouse. The castle also had a keep, called the Snow Tower, taller than the other towers, built in the French style, as at Bothwell Castle. Extensive earthworks protected the castle, including a dry moat and the ravine. Most of the castle foundations are now visible, along with most of its lower-storey walls. Archaeological excavations in 1925 uncovered decorative stone flooring and evidence of battles.

Today, the castle property is owned by Historic Scotland. A hotel (the Kildrummy Castle Hotel) has been built on the old estate, overlooking the ruins.

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« Reply #74 on: May 04, 2009, 01:28:39 pm »



Kildrummie Castle in Mar, engraving by William Miller after W Brown, published in Select Views Of The Royal Palaces Of Scotland, From Drawings by William Brown, Glasgow; With Illustrative Descriptions Of Their Local Situation, Present Appearance, And Antiquities. John Jamieson. Cadell & Co & Simpkin Marshall, Edinburgh & London 1830
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