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Castles of Scotland

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Boudica
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« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2007, 06:50:34 am »


An excellent example of the original Scottish Baronial architecture, the great seven-storey castle was completed in 1626 by the Aberdonian merchant William Forbes, ancestor to the "Forbes-Sempill family" and brother of the Bishop of Aberdeen. Forbes purchased the partially completed structure from the impoverished Mortimer family in the year 1610. William Forbes nickname was Danzig Willy, a reference to his shrewd international trading success. The Forbes family resided here for 350 years until 1963, when the property was gifted to the National Trust for Scotland.

Designed in the L plan, as was Muchalls Castle, which is located in the same region, Craigievar is noted for its exceptionally crafted plasterwork ceilings. Craigevar, Muchalls Castle and Glamis Castle are generally considered to have the three finest ceilings in Scotland. The Clan Forbes family were close friends of the Clan Burnett of Leys, who built both Crathes Castle and Muchalls Castle.

The castle originally had more defensive elements including a walled courtyard with four round towers; only one of the round towers remains today. In the arched door to that round tower are preserved the carved initials of Sir Thomas Forbes, William Forbes' son. There was also a massive iron yett or gate covering the entrance door.

The castle interior boasts a Great Hall that has the Stuart Arms over the fireplace; a musicians gallery; secret staircase connecting the high tower to the Great Hall; Queen's Bedroom; servants' quarters and of course several splendid plasterwork ceilings. There is a collection of Forbes family portraits inside as well as a considerable quantity of Forbes furnishings dating to the 17th and 18th centuries.

As of 2006, the castle, its estate, and over 200 acres of adjoining farmlands and woodlands are owned by the National Trust for Scotland. They are open to tourists during the summer months. The castle is closed to tour buses and large groups, but may be accessed by guided tour. Also, the castle will be closed from the end of August 2007, due to restoration work being carried out on its exterior.

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Boudica
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« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2007, 06:52:27 am »


Craigston Castle

Craigston Castle, Turriff, Aberdeenshire is a historic home of the Urquhart family. It was built 1604-1607 by John Urquhart of Craigfintry, known as the Tutor of Cromarty. The castle is composed of two main wings flanking the entrance and connected by an elevated arch, and surmounted by a richly corbelled parapet, regarded by many as one of the finest examples in Scotland. There are bases for corner turrets near the top corner of each wing, but the turrets themselves do not appear to have ever been completed. The wood carvings in the drawing room depict biblical themes and Clan Urquhart heraldic artefacts.

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Boudica
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« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2007, 06:57:45 am »


Crathes Castle

Crathes Castle is a 16th century castle near Banchory in the Aberdeenshire region of Scotland. This harled castle was built by the Burnetts of Leys and was held in that family for almost 400 years. [Official Burnett Website]

The castle and grounds are presently owned and managed by the National Trust for Scotland and are open to the public.

« Last Edit: December 04, 2007, 06:58:52 am by Boudica » Report Spam   Logged
Boudica
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« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2007, 07:00:09 am »



Crathes castle

Crathes sits on land given as a gift to the Burnett of Leys family by King Robert the Bruce in 1323.

In the 14th and 15th century the Burnett of Leys built a fortress of timbers on an island they made in the middle of a nearby bog. This method of fortiification, known as a crannog, was common in the Late Middle Ages. Construction of the current tower house of Crathes Castle was begun in 1553 but delayed several times during its construction due to political problems during the reign of Mary Queen of Scots.

It was completed in 1596 by Alexander Burnett of Leys, and an additional wing added in 18th century. Alexander Burnett, who completed the construction of Crathes, began a new project, the early 17th century reconstruction of nearby Muchalls Castle. That endeavour was completed by his son, Sir Thomas Burnett. Crathes Castle served as the ancestral seat of the Burnetts of Leys until gifted to the National Trust for Scotland by the 13th Baronet of Leys, Sir James Burnett in 1951. A fire damaged portions of the castle (in particular the Queen Anne wing) in 1966. Another historically important structure in this region linked to the Burnett of Leys family is Monboddo House.

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Boudica
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« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2007, 07:00:56 am »

Interior

The castle contains a significant collection of portraits, and intriguing original Jacobean painted ceilings survive in several rooms: the Chamber of the Muses, the Chamber of Nine Worthies and the Green Lady's Room. The last of these is said to be haunted by a green lady. A green smoke or mist is said to have been seen by visitors. The ancient jewelled ivory Horn of Leys residing in the great hall above the fireplace, was gifted to the Burnetts by the king along with the castle grounds in 1323.

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Boudica
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« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2007, 07:02:04 am »



The castle estate contains 530 acres (2.1 kmē) of woodlands and fields, including nearly four acres (16,000 mē) of walled garden. Within the walled garden are wondrous gravel paths laden with surrounding specimen plants mostly in herbaceous borders. Many of the plants are labelled with taxonomic descriptions, providing the visitor with a rich educational experience. There is also a perfectly manicured grass croquet court at a higher terraced level within the walled garden. Ancient topiary hedges of Irish yew dating from 1702 separate the gardens into eight themed areas. Today, Crathes and its grounds are open to tourists throughout the year. A visitors centre provides information about the castle and its surroundings. There is a tea shop on site, climbing wall, as well as a car park.
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Boudica
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« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2007, 07:06:13 am »

The Ghosts Of Crathes Castle

The Burnett's original home was on an island in the Loch of Leys. When the Laird died his widow, Lady Agnes became domineering over her son Alexander. She was jealous of his relationship with a lassie called Bertha who was living with them, in the care of the Lady. Romance blossomed between Alexander and Bertha. The Lady Agnes did not want this relationship for her son, instead she desired him to marry into a noble Scottish family. When Alexander was away from the Castle on a long trip Bertha died. The days prior to her death the servants noticed how unwell she had become and thought it was because she missed Alexander. When Alexander returned he was being comforted by his mother when he reached out for a goblet of wine. His mother snatched it from his hand and threw it out of the window and into the Loch. Seeing this, Alexander knew his mother had poisoned his sweetheart. Months later, Bertha's father returned to the Castle to bring her home. As Alexander and Lady Agnes explained her death, the room became chilly and Lady Agnes screamed and pointing to where she looked in terror cried "She comes, she comes" and then died. These events spurred Alexander to build the new Crathes Castle. However, once a year, on the anniversary of Bertha's death, a ghostly figure is seen crossing from the site of the old Castle to the new Castle. It is thought that this figure is either murdered Bertha or her murderer Lady Agnes.


In the haunted Green Lady's Room a figure carrying a baby has been seen crossing the room before disappearing in the fireplace. Sightings first appeared in the 18th Century. This is thought to be the ghost of a young girl who became pregnant by a servant. The servant was dismissed and the girl and her baby disappeared, thought to have eloped with her servant lover. However when in later years workmen where doing renovations to the room they uncovered skeletons under the hearthstone...then the hauntings began.

The Green Lady of Crathes Castle is not often seen these days, those she makes her presence felt and heard. It is said that if she appears and is seen a member of the Burnett family will die.


Book A Balloon Flight over Crathes Castle.



Britain's Best Alan Titchmarsh Crathes Castle Gardens

The Gardens of Crathes Castle in Banchory will feature in a television programme called Britain's Best on UKTV History. The host of the TV series is Alan Titchmarsh and viewers will be encouraged to vote for their favourite garden out of the 25 film locations. Britain's Best starts on 9 April 2007 and Crathes Castle Banchory episode will be broadcast on TBA.



How To Get To Crathes Castle


Take the A93 from Aberdeen, heading towards Banchory.



Crathes Castle Address Website and Telephone Number Contact Details

Crathes Castle
Banchory
Aberdeenshire
AB31 5QJ.
Tel: (01330) 844525
Official Crathes Castle website homepage url: www.nationaltrust.org.uk


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Boudica
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« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2008, 11:19:28 pm »

Castle Fraser



Castle Fraser is the most elaborate Z-plan castle in Scotland and one of the grandest 'Castles of Mar'. It is located near Inverurie in the Aberdeenshire region of Scotland.

Originally known as Muchall-in-Mar, construction of the elaborate, five-storey Z-plan castle was begun in 1575 by the 6th Laird of Fraser, Michael Fraser and was completed in 1636. A panel on the northern side of the castle is signed "I Bel", believed to be the mark of the master mason during much of the construction; however, the castle is actually a joint creation with another famous master mason of this period, Leiper.

Castle Fraser is contemporary with other famous nearby castles: Craigievar Castle, Crathes Castle and Muchalls Castle. Muchalls Castle was built over a 13th century stronghold of Clan Fraser, and its 17th century reconstruction was conducted by master mason Leiper.

Legend has it that a young princess was once staying at the castle when she was brutually murdered while asleep in the 'Green Room'. Her body was dragged down the stone stairs, leaving a trail of blood stains. As hard as they tried, the occupants of the castle could not scrub out the stains, and so were forced to cover the steps in wood panelling, which remains today. It is said she still stalks the halls of the castle during the night. Numerous sightings were reported by former Property Manager, Eric Wilkinson, and piano music was said to be frequently heard in the empty castle by its former owner, Lavinia Smiley.

The castle stands in over 300 acres (1.2 kmē) of open woodland and farmland, including a walled garden and two forest trails. There is archaeological evidence of an older square tower beneath the current construction.

Castle Fraser has recently been used as a backdrop for some of the scenes shot in the BAFTA, Golden Globe and Academy Award winning film "The Queen", starring Helen Mirren. Today, the castle is owned by the National Trust for Scotland and is open to tourists during the summer months. It can also be hired for weddings and corporate events.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 11:21:14 pm by Boudica » Report Spam   Logged
Boudica
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« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2008, 11:22:44 pm »



Castle Fraser, approaching from the carpark
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Boudica
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« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2008, 11:24:06 pm »



Looking through the rear gate into the rear courtyard at Castle Fraser

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Boudica
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« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2008, 11:26:03 pm »



The entrance to Castle Fraser, including the stonework panels around the door
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« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2008, 11:29:01 pm »

Delgatie Castle



Delgatie Castle is a castle near Turriff, in Aberdeenshire, Scotland.

A castle has stood on the site of Delgatie Castle since the year 1030 [[AD[[, although the earliest parts of the castle standing today were built between 1570 and 1579. Additional wings and a chapel were added in 1743.


The castle was stripped from the disgraced Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan after the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314 and given to Clan Hay (later to become the Earls of Erroll). Mary, Queen of Scots was a guest at the castle in 1562 after the Battle of Corrichie.

Like many castles, Delgatie is rumoured to be haunted. A number of reports of a ghostly red-haired figure were made by soldiers posted there during the Second World War.

Architecturally, the castle consists of a keep, adjoining house and two later wings. Notable features include a very wide turnpike stair and painted ceilings dating from the 16th century in some rooms.

Today, the castle and its gardens are owned by the Delgatie Castle Trust. They are open to the public throughout the summer months and suites within the castle itself and a number of cottages the estate are available to rent.

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« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2008, 11:31:00 pm »



Copyright 2006,2007 - John D. Hays - Free to use if original author is credited.
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Boudica
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« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2008, 11:34:28 pm »

Drum Castle




Drum Castle is a castle near Drumoak in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. For centuries it was the seat of the chief of Clan Irvine. The place-name Drum is derived from Gaelic druim, 'ridge'.

The original 13th century tower of Drum Castle has been suggested as the work of medieval architect Richard Cementarius, who built the Bridge of Don in Old Aberdeen. It is believed to be one of the three oldest tower-houses in Scotland (and the most unaltered). A large wing was added in 1619 by the 9th laird, further alterations were made during the Victorian era.

The castle and its grounds were granted to William Irvine in 1323 by Robert the Bruce, and remained in the possession of Clan Irvine until 1975. Drum played a role in the Covenanting Rebellion (as did nearby Muchalls Castle) leading to its being attacked and sacked three times.

The castle is surrounded by late 18th century gardens, including a rose garden and arboretum containing trees from all regions of the 18th century British Empire.

Today, the castle is owned by the National Trust for Scotland and is open during the summer months. The chapel, dining hall and estate may be hired for weddings and corporate functions. A variety of local events such as classic car rallies and musical fetes also occur here.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2008, 11:35:28 pm by Boudica » Report Spam   Logged
Boudica
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« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2008, 11:36:28 pm »

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