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Twin Peaks

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Author Topic: Twin Peaks  (Read 5086 times)
Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #60 on: November 12, 2007, 01:13:06 am »



Recipe

8 inch Crust: 1-1/2 c. flour, 1/2 c. Crisco, 1/4 c. ice water
Mix flour and Crisco with fork. Add ice water. Mix with your hands. When blended, roll into ball and refrigerate overnight. To roll out: flour both rolling pin and flat surface, split ball in two, roll out 1/2 to fit pan and 1/2 for lattice.
Filling: 3 c. cherries (pitted, sour frozen); 1 c. water; 1c. Baker's sugar; 4 T. cornstarch; 1/8 t. salt
Thaw cherries at room temp and strain (yields 2 c. juice). Taste for sweetness, more/less sugar may be needed. Add 1 c. water to make 3 c. juice (reserve 1 c. juice for cornstarch mix). Dissolve cornstarch in 1 c. juice, stir with whip. Combine 2 c. juice, 2/3 c. sugar, salt, and bring to a boil. Add cornstarch mix, cook until clear, about 5 min. (if cooked to long, syrup gets gummy). Remove from heat, stir in 1/3 c. sugar (blend thoroughly). Pour mixture over cherries, fold with wooden spoon, cool (stir mix while cooling to prevent scum from forming on top). Pour mix in pie shell. Top completed pie with lattice crust. Bake @ 425 degrees for 35-40 min.
"...And if you're ever in Los Angeles, Diane, try Twin Peaks Cherry Pie at DuPars REstaurant and Bakery."
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #61 on: November 12, 2007, 01:16:29 am »

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« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2007, 01:18:48 am »



Bobby Briggs


Robert "Bobby" Briggs (Dana Ashbrook) is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks. He is not to be confused with BOB. He was the boyfriend of Laura Palmer and therefore one of the lead suspects. He is the son of Major Garland Briggs, and has an uneasy relationship with his father, who is very strict and seemingly non-understanding about his son's rebelliousness, especially his smoking.

Bobby becomes jealous of James Hurley when he discovers he was secretly seeing his official girlfriend, Laura. Laura Palmer on the other hand did not really love Bobby, she only used him to get a part of Bobby's ****. Bobby was secretly seeing Shelly Johnson even before Laura's death, and they move in together when Leo Johnson becomes comatose.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #63 on: November 12, 2007, 01:20:45 am »



Bobby Briggs

Nickname: Briggsee
Birth date: 12/10/72
Sign: Sagittarius
Likes: Football
Education: Twin Peaks High School
Actor: Dana Ashbrook

Accomplishments:
I was the starting quarter back on the Twin Peaks High School football team and captain of the team my senior year. I hold the record for most pass completions (150) in the school's history. I was also voted "Most Handsome" my senior year.

Strengths:
My strengths are my strong are and leadership qualities. I am very successful with chicks. Shelley adores me.

Weaknesses:
I do not study much and, for that matter, hate going to class. I prefer short cuts to success.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #64 on: November 12, 2007, 01:23:55 am »


Major Garland Briggs is a fictional character on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks, portrayed by Don S. Davis. He is a U. S. Air Force officer involved in Project Blue Book. He is the father of Bobby Briggs, whose smoking he cannot abide. His work is highly classified; he does not tell even his family about it.

His name is probably taken from a mathematician who worked with J. W. Alexander.

The role can be seen as a precursor to Davis’s character Lt. Gen. George Hammond on the series Stargate SG-1, who is also an Air Force officer involved in secret projects.

His greatest fear is “the possibility that love is not enough.”

Due to Major Briggs’s secret investigations, the entrance to the Black Lodge is discovered in the woods at Twin Peaks. He is himself abducted (taken to the White Lodge?), and is told to deliver a message to Special Agent Dale Cooper at one point, by the Log Lady.

In the second season, Major Briggs and Bobby find some common ground and make up.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #65 on: November 12, 2007, 01:26:13 am »



Sheriff's Station

Location:
Located in the center of Twin Peaks on Highway 21 (Main Street)

Points of Interest:
Moving up the ranks from Assistant Sheriff, Harry S. Truman has successfully run the Sheriff's Station for the past six years. The Sheriff's office has state-of-the-art equipment including an eight-line telephone system and intercom, photocopy machine, fax machine (since 1988), fingerpringing, Polaroid camera, and three maximum security cells, from which no one has ever escaped, until BOB.
The Station is just two blocks from the Wagon Wheel Bakery, and fresh coffee and donuts are supplied daily to the office personnel and visitors. Tours are available on Tuesdays.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #66 on: November 12, 2007, 01:27:03 am »


Lucy Moran is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Kimmy Robertson.

Lucy is a high voiced, childlike blonde receptionist at the Twin Peaks' sheriff's department. She is seeing deputy sheriff Andy Brennan, until she they have an argument. She reveals later that she was also seeing Richard Tremayne, Horn's Department Store, Men's Fashion, after feeling frustrated with Andy. Lucy gets pregnant, which turns out to be the reason why she and Andy have been fighting. The paternity of the child is called into question when Andy reveals that he cannot be the father of the baby, due to low sperm count. He gets retested and finds out that he could have been the father. This sparks off a competition between Andy and Dick Tremaine, both vying for Lucy's affection and the role of father to her child. This includes adopting "Little Nicky" through the Big Brothers program. After some particularly rude behavior from Dick Tremaine, Lucy decides not to wait for the baby to be born in order to determine paternity and chooses Andy as the father of her child.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #67 on: November 12, 2007, 01:32:00 am »



Andy Brennan

Andy Brennan is a character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Harry Goaz. Andy is a bit slow, even "dimwitted" deputy sheriff in the Twin Peaks Sheriff's department. He is very sensitive, and tends to cry at crime scenes. However, he is very loyal, and trustworthy... indeed at one point Albert Rosenfield compares him to a dog.

Andy has been seeing the secretary of sheriff's department, Lucy Moran. She, however has grown tired of him, and seeks an adventure from seeing Dick Tremayne. Not much is revealed of Andy during the show, except perhaps through physical comedy, such as his inadequacy at handling guns and sticky tape. However, Andy later improves his gun toting skills by using the local range, and shooting Jacques Renault when he tries to go for Sheriff Truman.

Andy was the one who (at Season Two) figured out that the drawing was a map, and therefore had a big part in FBI agent Dale Cooper finding his way to the Black Lodge.

In the pilot, he is revealed as a trumpeter, albeit not a very good one. And he has a talent at drawing which we see demonstrated when he sketches Bob from Sarah Palmer's vision, and during the trial of Leland Palmer, when he sketches the back of Leland's head.

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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #68 on: November 12, 2007, 01:35:27 am »



Hawk
Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, portrayed by Michael Horse. He is a Native American, but it is not clear which tribe he belongs to. He is usually referred to as "Hawk" because of his excellent tracking skills, which extend not just to animal or human tracks, but also those of cars and trucks. He was born in 1951.

Hawk works at the Twin Peaks sheriff's department under Sheriff Harry S. Truman. He is one of the Bookhouse Boys, and is an all-around dependable good guy. He has an unseen girlfriend who is a veterinarian.

Hawk knows Harry (and FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper) well, which saves their lives on more than one occasion.
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Jami Ferrina
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« Reply #69 on: November 12, 2007, 01:36:18 am »

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« Reply #70 on: November 12, 2007, 01:40:29 am »


Man from Another Place

The Man from Another Place (or "the Arm") also called The Midget or “The Dancing Dwarf” is a character in the Mark Frost and David Lynch television series, Twin Peaks. He is portrayed by Michael J. Anderson. In the original broadcast version of the series, he made his first appearance in the second episode of the first season, “Zen, or the Skill to Catch a Killer", however his first appearance for international audiences was in the so-called "International Version" of the show's pilot episode, which featured an ending that differed from what was broadcast in the United States.

The Man from Another Place is one of several spirits that live primarily in the White and Black Lodges, other dimensional places which are sometimes accessed by the unwary in the woods surrounding the town of Twin Peaks. The lodges seem to represent good and evil. The living can accidentally find them and become trapped in them. The lodges are also accessible to the souls of the dead. The spirits of the lodges seem to have different purposes. Some are evil, and feed on pain, lust, and more importantly, fear. Some visit the living in dreams or appear out in the open, often to deliver mysterious warnings. The Man from Another Place has been seen to deliver warnings or shed light on mysterious tragedies, as well as mediate among the spirits, suggesting that he is a figure of balance. However, his counterpart, the Giant, has also delivered warnings and provided clues to Agent Cooper in his search for the truth.

The Man from Another Place is dressed in a sharp red suit, is very short, and talks in an odd, distorted way. He seems to reside in a red curtained room, later learned to be the White and Black Lodges.[citation needed] If nothing else, the color scheme represents fear, terror, arousal, and imminent danger. The Man dances in an odd, old fashioned way to jazzy music (the song is "Dance of the Dream Man"). There exists in the Man from Another Place the queer promise of a strange, occult knowledge that is paramount for FBI Agent Dale Cooper in his pursuit of Laura Palmer’s killer.

The events that occur in the White and Black Lodges do not always happen concurrently with the linear timeline of the outside world, suggesting that they exist outside of the regular flow of time, and can be unremembered by those who experience them. FBI Agent Dale Cooper first encounters the Man from Another Place, and the Lodges, in a dream which a caption (25 years later...) indicates depicts some kind of future events, and in the dream Cooper is noticeably older (a version of this sequence is used in the International Version of the pilot). In the movie prequel Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Laura Palmer has a dream where she sees a young Dale Cooper meet the Man in the Lodge for the first time. When Cooper later dreams of the Lodge, he has no memory of this encounter.

The character appears in five episodes over the course of the series, as well as material from the second episode which was aired as part of the pilot episode when released as an individual release in Europe and Japan.

In the prequel to the Twin Peaks TV series, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, he appears again in a dream, where he enigmatically tells Agent Dale Cooper “I am the arm.” Interestingly, another character, Phillip Gerard AKA “Mike,” is missing an arm, raising the probable conclusion that The Man From Another Place is the spiritual embodiment of the missing arm, which Mike cut off to free himself from his evil impulses, also making the Giant the spiritual embodiment of the body, from which the arm was cast. This conclusion is further reinforced by the scene that takes place in the Black Lodge at the end of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me which depicts Mike and the Man from Another Place speaking in unison while the latter places his hand upon the spot where Mike's arm used to be. In Agent Cooper's dream, the Man from Another Place also says, “My voice sounds like this,” and makes a high pitched beeping noise, like a beacon. This same noise is heard twice in the movie: when Agent Chester Desmond visits a trailer park and disappears and when Leland and Laura Palmer are driving and Phillip Gerard approaches them in his vehicle. When Cooper investigates the trailer park, he finds the words “Let’s Rock” scrawled across the windshield of Desmond’s car. These same words are spoken by the Man in the “25 years later...” dream in Twin Peaks’s second episode.

Agent Cooper is also visited in dreams by the Giant (who is "One and the same" with the dwarf, lending to theories that the waiting room is a neutral place between the shadow and the light. In the show's final episode, Cooper enters the White and Black Lodges. He again encounters the little man, as well as the Giant. The Giant sits on the couch next to the little man, and they say to Cooper, "one and the same". In this same final episode, the spirits and souls that appear in the black lodge seemed to have good or evil doubles, including, surprisingly, the Man from Another Place (both the Giant and the Midget are represented as a pair on the petroglyph found in Twin Peaks' Owl Cave).

The strange cadence of the Man’s dialogue was achieved by having Michael J. Anderson speak into a recorder. This was then played in reverse, and Anderson was directed to repeat the reversed original. This “reverse-speak” was then reversed again in editing to bring it back to the normal direction. This created the strange rhythm and accentuation that set Cooper’s dream world apart from the real world.

Michael J. Anderson recalls that his reverse-speak was not difficult to master as, coincidentally, he had used it as a secret language with his junior high school friends. David Lynch was unaware of this when he cast Anderson in the part, and even hired a trainer to help Anderson with the enunciations, but when he found out he could already talk backwards so well he cancelled the trainer and wrote more and more difficult lines of dialogue for Anderson to read.

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« Reply #71 on: November 12, 2007, 01:43:45 am »


The Giant is a fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks, played by Carel Struycken.

FBI agent Dale Cooper has seen the Giant in visions or while asleep. The Giant seems to be on the side of good, and he has given Cooper signs of what is to come and clues about the murder of Laura Palmer.

The giant seems to reside in the waiting room of the lodges (the Black Lodge and the White Lodge) with the Man from Another Place (the midget). They are "one and the same", implying that the waiting room is a neutral location.

The giant's visitations are often preceded by real world appearances of The Elderly Room Service Waiter, who wears a similar outfit to the Giant.

In the show's final episode, Cooper enters the otherworldly White and Black Lodges. There, he again encounters the little Man from Another Place. The Giant also appears, and sits on the couch next to the little man. They both look at Cooper and say, "one and the same".

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« Reply #72 on: November 12, 2007, 01:45:52 am »


Bob, often written as BOB or Killer BOB, is the primary villain in the TV series Twin Peaks. He is portrayed as a malevolent entity who possesses people and feeds off their garmonbozia (pain and suffering). He was played by Frank Silva.


Bob possesses people and uses their bodies to murder and ****. He is an evil spirit of some kind, who has a connection to the woods and the owls outside the town. Everytime BOB kills someone, he places a letter underneath the victim's nail to spell out his real name "ROBERT".

Bob was once human; in his corporeal form, he was a serial killer whose partner in murder was a man named Mike (Al Strobel). At some point, Mike had a religious epiphany and repented, cutting off his own arm to rid himself of his "Fire Walk With Me" tattoo, which symbolised being touched by an "evil one". When Bob would not repent, Mike killed him. Bob's spirit remained however, and possessed Leland Palmer in order to continue his spree. Mike searched for Bob, aware that he was still killing, but unable to tell who his host was.

Bob's victims are not fully aware that they are possessed. Leland Palmer was possessed by Bob when he was still a boy. As an adult, Leland molested, raped and eventually murdered his daughter, Laura, all while under Bob's influence. It is implied that Laura allowed herself to be killed, because she knew that death was the only escape from being Bob's next host. Bob's bloodlust took over and he killed Laura through Leland, robbing himself of his new chosen host body.

By the end of the series (including the prequel film), Bob is known to have killed at least three people through Leland: Teresa Banks, Leland's mistress; Laura Palmer, Leland's daughter; and Madeline Ferguson, Leland's niece. He kills Leland by smashing him into the jail wall. In the final episode, Bob seems to be absorbing the soul of Windom Earle in the Black Lodge.

Bob possesses several people during the show's run, and the final episode of the show climaxed with Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) being possessed by Bob.

Bob is a symbol of the evil that can lurk beneath the surface of apparently ordinary people. FBI agent Albert Rosenfield articulates this at one point, suggesting that Bob is not a real entity unto itself, but rather an embodiment of "the evil that men do".

The all-capitals form of his name, "BOB", is described in Jennifer Lynch's spin-off book The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer as a warning for people to Beware Of Bob.

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« Reply #73 on: November 12, 2007, 01:47:32 am »


Frank Silva (31 October 1949-13 September 1995) was a Portuguese American set dresser and sometime actor best known for his disturbing performance as the evil spirit Bob in the TV series Twin Peaks.

Silva had a degree in lighting design from San Francisco State University and worked as a prop master and set decorator on several films including David Lynch’s Wild at Heart.

Silva also worked on Lynch’s Twin Peaks. According to David Lynch on the 2007 Gold Edition DVD release of Twin Peaks, Lynch was upstairs in the Laura Palmer house, near Silva as he worked, and suddenly realized that Silva might have a place in the show. He asked Silva if he was an actor, and Silva said that he was. Later, Lynch accidentally caught him on camera when his reflection appeared in a mirror, and thus was born the character of Bob, a dark spirit who haunts Laura. Silva appeared occasionally as Bob, or Killer BOB, for the remainder of the Twin Peaks series and even appeared as Bob in the 1992 feature movie Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me. His first major appearance is in the International Version of the Twin Peaks pilot, which contained a standalone ending that resolved the mystery of the series and incorporated the above-mentioned accidental footage.

Frank Silva died from a heart condition/AIDS in 1995 at age 45.

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« Reply #74 on: November 12, 2007, 01:53:00 am »

Frank Silva was a set decorator who worked on the pilot episode. One day, when he was moving furniture in Laura Palmer's bedroom, a woman remarked to Silva not to get locked in the (Laura Palmer's) room. The image of Silva trapped in the room sparked something in Lynch, who then asked Silva if he was an actor. Silva replied "Yes", and Lynch told him that he had a part in mind for him on the series. Silva accepted, and Lynch shot footage of him behind Laura's bed with no real idea of what he would do with it.

When Lynch shot the scene of Sarah Palmer's frightening vision, Silva's reflection was accidentally caught in the footage. Silva can be seen in the mirror behind Sarah Palmer's head. Lynch was made aware of this accident, but decided to keep Silva in the scene.

MIKE's appearance in the pilot episode was only originally intended to be a "kind of homage to The Fugitive. The only thing he was gonna do was be in this elevator and walk out."[4] However, when Lynch wrote the "Fire walk with me" speech, he imagined MIKE saying it in the basement of the Twin Peaks hospital – a scene that would appear in the European version of the pilot episode, and surface later in Agent Cooper's dream sequence. MIKE's full name, Phillip Michael Gerard, is also a reference to Lieutenant Philip Gerard, a character in The Fugitive.

Lynch met Michael J. Anderson in 1987. After seeing him in a short film, Lynch wanted to cast the actor in the title role in Ronnie Rocket, but that project failed to get made. While editing the alternate ending of the foreign version of the pilot episode, an idea occurred to Lynch on his way home one day: "I was leaning against a car — the front of me was leaning against this very warm car. My hands were on the roof and the metal was very hot. The Red Room scene leapt into my mind. 'Little Mike' was there, and he was speaking backwards... For the rest of the night I thought only about The Red Room."
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