Atlantis Online
October 17, 2019, 05:37:00 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Has the Location of the Center City of Atlantis Been Identified?
http://www.mysterious-america.net/hasatlantisbeenf.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Twin Peaks

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Twin Peaks  (Read 4964 times)
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2007, 10:38:37 pm »


During the first and second season, it was the search for Laura Palmer's killer that served as the engine for the plot, and caught the public's imagination, although the creators admitted this was largely a macguffin— each episode was really about the interactions between the townsfolk. The unique (and often bizarre) personalities of each citizen formed a web of minutiae which ran contrary to the quaint appearance of the town. Adding to the surreal atmosphere was the recurrence of Dale Cooper's Lovecraftian dreams, in which the FBI agent is given clues to Laura's murder in a supernatural realm that may or may not be of his imagination.

The first season contained only eight episodes (including the two-hour pilot episode), and was considered technically and artistically revolutionary for television at the time, and geared toward reaching the standards of film. It has been said that Twin Peaks began the trend of accomplished cinematography now commonplace in today's television dramas. Lynch and Frost maintained tight control over the first season, handpicking all of the directors, with some that Lynch had known from his days at the American Film Institute (e.g., Caleb Deschanel and Tim Hunter) or referrals from those he knew personally. Lynch and Frost's control lessened in the second season, corresponding with what is generally regarded as a lessening of quality once the identity of Laura Palmer's murderer was revealed.

Its ambitious style, paranormal undertones, and engaging murder mystery made Twin Peaks a surprising hit. Its quirky characters, particularly Kyle MacLachlan's special agent Dale Cooper, were unorthodox for a supposed 'crime drama,' as was Cooper's method of interpreting his dreams to solve the crime.

Following the cliffhanger finale of the first season, the show's popularity reached its zenith, and "Peaksmania" seeped into mainstream popular culture (such as Saturday Night Live, in which Kyle MacLachlan hosted and performed a sketch that parodied the show). For the 1990 Emmy Awards, Twin Peaks led all series with eight nominations, although it failed to win one.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2007, 10:42:49 pm »


With the resolution of the show's main drawing point (Laura Palmer's murder) in the middle of the second season, and with subsequent storylines becoming more obscure and drawn out, public interest finally began to wane, and "Peaksmania" seemed over. This discontent, coupled with ABC changing its timeslot over a number of occasions, led to a huge drop in ratings after being the most-watched television programming in the USA in 1990. On February 15, 1991, ABC announced that the show had been put on "indefinite hiatus", a move which usually leads to cancellation.[9]

This wasn't quite the end, though, as there was still a large enough fanbase for viewers to begin an organized letter-writing campaign, dubbed C.O.O.P (Citizens Opposed to the Offing of Peaks). The campaign was successful, and ABC agreed to another six episodes to finish the season.

In the final episodes, Agent Cooper was given a love interest, Annie Blackburn (Heather Graham), to replace the intended story arc with Audrey Horne. The series finale did not sufficiently boost interest, and the show was not renewed for a third season, leaving an unresolved cliffhanger ending that continues to be debated.

David Lynch himself returned to direct the finale of the series, annoying a few of the actors and writers, as they had previously felt "abandoned" by him. The writers, for their part, didn't appreciate his changes to their scripts.

In the featurette "A Slice of David Lynch", included with the 2007 "Gold Box Edition" DVD release of the complete series, Lynch expressed his regret at having resolved the Laura Palmer murder, stating he and Frost had never intended for the series to answer the question and that doing so "killed the goose that laid the golden eggs". Lynch directly blames network pressure for the decision to resolve the Palmer storyline prematurely.[10]

Later, David Lynch, having been long unhappy with ABC's "meddling" during the show's production, sold the whole show to Bravo for a small sum. Bravo began airing the show from scratch again, along with Lynch's addition of introductions to each episode by the Log Lady and her cryptic musings.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2007, 10:45:04 pm »


FBI Special Agent Dale Bartholomew Cooper (sometimes called "Coop") was the lead fictional character in the television series Twin Peaks (1990-1991), created by Mark Frost and David Lynch. The character was played throughout both seasons by Kyle MacLachlan, who also briefly reprised the role for the prequel film Fire Walk With Me.

Cooper arrives in Twin Peaks to investigate the brutal murder of the popular high-school student, Laura Palmer, and falls in love with Twin Peaks and gains a great deal of acceptance within a tight knit community. He displays an array of quirky mannerisms such as giving a 'thumbs up' when satisfied, sage-like sayings, distinct sense of humour, along with his love for a good cherry pie and a "damn fine cup of coffee". One of his most popular habits is recording spoken-word tapes to a mysterious woman called 'Diane' into his dictaphone that he always carries with him, that often contain everyday observations and thoughts on his current case.

Cooper is a graduate of Haverford College. He is also revealed to be something of an introverted personality, due to his profound interest in the mystical, particularly in Tibet and Native American mythology. Much of his work is based on intuition and even dreams; this is in contrast to other fictional detectives who uses logic to solve their cases. Like many television detectives, however, he sometimes bends the rules or goes outside the law.

Cooper remains one of the most popular characters from a dramatic television series, and is cited as a favourite of television writer Joss Whedon [1].

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2007, 10:46:59 pm »



Prior to arrival in Twin Peaks

On joining the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Dale Cooper was based at the Bureau offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was here Cooper was partnered with the older Windom Earle, a veteran of the Bureau who taught the young Cooper everything he knew about the FBI. (Cooper later refers to his former partner as having a "brilliant" mind). At some point, Cooper would be based under the authority of FBI Bureau Chief Gordon Cole, who dealt with the mysterious 'Blue Rose' cases.

Some time after joining the Bureau, Earle's wife, Caroline was a witness to a federal crime. Earle and Cooper were assigned to protect her, and it was around this time that Cooper began an affair with Caroline, unbeknowst to his partner. However, one night, whilst in Pittsburgh, Cooper let his guard down - and Caroline was murdered by her husband by way of a knife wound to the aorta. Cooper's former partner and mentor had "lost his mind" (and may have indeed been the perpetrator of the federal crime Caroline witnessed), and was subsequently sent to a mental institution. Cooper was absolutely devastated by the loss of the woman he would later refer to as "the love of my life", and swore to never again get involved with someone who was a part of a case he was assigned to.

Three years before his arrival to Twin Peaks, Cooper has a dream involving the plight of the Tibetan people, and revealed to him the deductive technique of the Tibetan method. Deeply moved by what he saw in this dream, it is indicated it was this event that formed the basis of his unconventional methods of investigation.

In February 1988, Dale Cooper reveals to his boss, FBI Regional Bureau Chief Gordon Cole of the portents of a strange dream - whilst at the same time Agent Chester Desmond is investigating the bizarre murder of Theresa Banks in the town of Deer Meadow, north-east Washington. While conducting an experiement involving security camera monitors in the corridor outside his office, Cooper is shocked by the sudden bizarre appearance of Agent Phillip Jeffries in Cole's office - having vanished in the field two years before.

Hurrying towards Cole, and in front of Cooper and his colleague, Agent Albert Rosenfield, Jeffries starts raving in a loud and disturbed manner, referring at one stage to Cooper and yelling “Who do you think this is, there?”. Jeffries refers to names and incidents that are unfamiliar to those listening, before suddenly disappearing into thin air. Suddenly, the three receive a phone call telling of Agent Desmond's sudden disappearance in Deer Meadow.

Following up on this, and sensing a connection, Cooper retraces Desmond's steps through Deer Meadow - but is unable to discover the fate of his colleague or Theresa Banks' murderer. In a recording to Diane, Cooper refers to his deep conviction that the killer will strike again, "but as the old saying goes, who knows where or when?"

Roughly a year later, in 1989, Cooper tells Rosenfield in the Philadelphia offices of how he senses Banks' killer will strike again soon, and that his victim will be a young woman, who has blonde hair, is sexually active, using drugs, and is crying out for help. (And that Rosenfield will help him solve the case). Rosenfield is quick to dismiss Cooper's notion, however, reminding Cooper he is "talking about half the high school girls in America!"

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2007, 10:49:58 pm »


On February 24, 1989, Cooper is called into to investigate the murder of homecoming queen Laura Palmer in the town of Twin Peaks, in northeast Washington. (Following the potential second victim, Ronette Pulaski emerging across the state line). Cooper's initial examination of Laura's body reveals a tiny typed letter 'R' inserted under her fingernail. He recognizes this as the "calling card" of the killer who took the life of Teresa Banks in Deer Meadow.

Alongside Sheriff Harry S. Truman and his deputies, Cooper quickly establishes that Laura's character and relationships are not as they first appear, and that she's far from the wholesome homecoming queen that those closest to her believed her to be. It is revealed that Laura was two-timing her boyfriend Bobby Briggs with sullen biker James Hurley, a fact known to Laura's best friend Donna Hayward. Cooper also finds traces of **** in Laura's diary, indicating a drug habit she shared with Bobby.

During his investigation, Cooper stays at the Great Northern Hotel owned by the Horne family. The Hornes' sultry daughter Audrey develops a crush on Cooper that initially appears to be mutual. However, Cooper later rebuffs her advances, on the grounds that she is a high schooler and she is involved in the case he is working on. With Audrey's help, Cooper traces Laura's **** usage to One-Eyed Jack's, a brothel across the Canadian border. It is revealed that Laura had also been working as a prostitute there. Without his knowing, Audrey infiltrates the brothel and later has to be rescued by Cooper and Truman in an extralegal operation.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2007, 10:51:57 pm »



Cooper also experiences a bizarre dream, in which he sees a one-armed man called Mike, who chants a strange poem: "Through the darkness of future past / The magician longs to see / One chants out between two worlds / Fire walk with me." Mike tells Cooper about another man called Bob, and how they went "killing together." Bob also appears as a man with long grey hair, dressed in denim, who swears to Cooper, "I will kill again." As the dream continues, Cooper finds himself twenty-five years older, sitting in a mysterious red-curtained room. It is here he meets the diminutive Man From Another Place who intones clues to Cooper in the form of strange phrases and then proceeds to dance to a jazzy beat. Also present is the spirit of Laura Palmer, who kisses Cooper and then whispers into his ear the name of her killer. When he awakes, Cooper is unable to recall the killer's name.

Cooper and the local police force are then able to track down the one-armed man, whose full name is Phillip Michael Gerard. Gerard appears to be nothing more than a shoe salesman and claims to know nothing of the Bob that Cooper describes. However, it eventually becomes clear that Gerard is possessed by the "inhabiting spirit Mike" who reveals to Cooper and his colleages the true nature of Bob - Bob is a fellow inhabiting spirit who has possessed someone in Twin Peaks "for over forty years."

Cooper is also visited by an apparition of a mysterious Giant who provides him with further clues in the murder investigation. All this information that Cooper has gained from psychic and empirical means, including the mysterious utterances of an eccentric local woman known as The Log Lady, leads him to a number of suspects; but when he discovers the existence of Laura's second, secret diary, he realizes that therein lies the key to solving the mystery. Harold Smith, a local man who was one of Laura's confidants, holds this diary. The secret diary reveals that from a very early age Laura was abused by a figure called 'Bob', and that her use of drugs and sex are the means she has used to numb herself and escape from him.

On the night before she is to leave town, Laura's lookalike cousin, Maddy Ferguson is brutally murdered by Laura's father, Leland, who is revealed as the man who is possessed by 'Bob'. Cooper and Truman apprehend him, and as they interrogate the crazed Leland, it becomes clear that Leland has little to no memory of his grotesque actions while under Bob's influence. After confessing the two murders, Bob forces Leland to smash his own head against the wall of his cell. As Cooper and Truman rush to his side, Leland's memories of what he has done return to him, and in his dying moment, Leland claims to see Laura. However, as Cooper and the others note, if Bob has truly left Leland's body, it means his spirit is now loose in the woods of Twin Peaks.

With the murder investigation concluded, Cooper is then all set to leave Twin Peaks when he is framed for drug trafficking by the Franco-Canadian criminal Jean Renault, who blames Cooper for the death of his brothers Jacques and Bernard, who both had been killed since Coooper's arrival. Cooper is temporarily suspended from the FBI.

After Renault is killed in a shoot-out with police and Cooper is cleared of the charges, his former FBI partner and mentor Windom Earle, who has escaped and come to Twin Peaks to play a deadly game of chess with Cooper, in which each piece of Cooper's that he takes means someone dies. Earle hides out in the woods so he may go about plotting his revenge scheme. Cooper explains to Truman his connection with Earle (see above).

As this is going on, Cooper continues to try to track down the origins and whereabouts of Bob, and learns more about the mysteries of the dark woods surrounding Twin Peaks. It is here he learns of the existence of the White Lodge and the Black Lodge, two mystical extradimensional realms whose gateways reside somewhere in the woods and which are occupied by spirits, that appear in Cooper's dreams and visions (metaphorically referred to as owls - "The owls are not what they seem"). Cooper also falls in love with a new girl in town, Annie Blackburn.

When Annie wins the Miss Twin Peaks contest, Windom Earle kidnaps her and takes her to the Black Lodge, which Cooper realises has been Earle's goal all along. The Black Lodge then is revealed to be the place where Bob, the Man From Another Place and the Giant come from, and where the red-curtained room of Cooper's dream is located. Cooper follows Earle into the Lodge and has a set of bizarre encounters with doppelgangers of dead characters, including Caroline Earle and Leland Palmer. During Cooper's journey, Windom Earle is 'killed' by an enraged Bob, but Annie's fate is unclear. Cooper then tries to escape, but cannot find the exit in the nonlinear path of the Black Lodge. He is also chased by his own smiling doppelganger as he tries to find a way out. The doppelganger catches him, and both Cooper and Annie return to the woods, unconscious. He awakens in his room at the Great Northern Hotel and says "I wasn't sleeping", in an ominous tone of voice. In the final shot of the television series, Cooper slams his forehead into the bathroom mirror, and his reflection is that of 'Bob'.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2007, 10:54:49 pm »


The feature film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me subtly expands on the events of Cooper's fate in the series finale, while at the same time functioning as a prequel that details the last week of Laura Palmer's life.

At one point while experiencing a strange dream involving the Black Lodge and its residents, in the non-linear realm Laura encounters Cooper at a point after he has become trapped there. Cooper implores her not to take "the ring", a mysterious object that gives it's wearer a sort of connection to the Black Lodge. Shortly thereafter, Laura also has a vision of a bloody Annie Blackburn beside her in her bed, who tells her: "My name is Annie. I've been with Laura and Dale. The good Dale is in the Lodge, and he can't leave. Write it in your diary." It is unknown if Laura did in fact transcribe this to the diary in her possession at the time. (Though, it has been said had the series continued in some fashion, this plot would have followed up on).

At the film's conclusion, Laura's spirit sits in the Red Room, and is looking up at Cooper whose hand is resting on her shoulder, and is smiling at her. Shortly thereafter, Laura's angel appears before them both and the film ends. The meaning behind Cooper's prescence alongside Laura, and indeed, his ultimate fate - if he ever escaped the Black Lodge - is unknown.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #22 on: November 11, 2007, 10:56:51 pm »


In 1990, Simon & Schuster Audio released a cassette entitled Diane ... The Twin Peaks Tapes of Agent Cooper which compiled many of the recorded diary entries of Cooper that had been featured in the first season and the beginning of the second, along with specially-recorded entries including several taking place prior to the pilot episode. The tape goes up to the aftermath of Cooper's shooting at the start of the second season.[1]

Published by Pocket Books in 1991, the official tie-in book The Autobiography of F.B.I. Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes by Scott Frost (writer) (the brother of Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost) features a collection of transcripts from Cooper's audio tapes, from his early childhood to the day he is assigned to Laura Palmer's murder. It reveals that Cooper was born on April 19, 1954, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and details his first stumbles with love, obsession with the FBI and the relationships between himself, his parents, Windom Earle and Earle's wife, Caroline. Many of these tape transcripts are dictated to "Diane", though a later tape states that Cooper enjoys the thought of Diane listening to his tapes so much that he will address all tapes to her, whether she will ever listen to them or not. It also reveals how Cooper investigated the murder of Teresa Banks in the town of Deer Meadow - a fact that could not be reconciled following the release of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me a year later.

Like all Twin Peaks spin-off media, the canonicity of these two products in relation to the television series is unclear, although the Diane... cassette did incorporate canoncial elements of the television series.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #23 on: November 11, 2007, 10:58:30 pm »


Much like how he relates to the town itself, Cooper gains an instant rapport with much of the townspeople on arrival to Twin Peaks - most particularly Sheriff Harry S. Truman and his deputies, Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill and Deputy Andy Brennan. While Truman is initially skeptical of Cooper's unconventional investigation methods and other-worldly ideas, he is most often willing to accept Cooper's judgement. (Even referring to Cooper as "the finest lawman I have ever known" to agents investigating Cooper's alleged drug-running to Canada). Overtime there emerges a strong bond between the two, and a fierce loyalty to one another, most notably when Truman assists Cooper in rescuing Audrey Horne from One-Eyed Jacks, Cooper becoming a deputy following his suspension from the Bureau, and then Truman waiting patiently for two days at Glastonberry Grove for Cooper to emerge from the Black Lodge in the series finale.

Cooper's strongest relationship outside of the townspeople is that of his friendship with his colleague, Agent Albert Rosenfield. Though he has strong respect and admiration for Rosenfield's medical skills, and is seemingly unintimidated by Rosenfield's sarcastic manner, he has little tolerance or patience for Rosenfield's treatment of the town's citizens - most particuarly his animosity towards Sheriff Truman. (Which notably thaws over time).

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #24 on: November 11, 2007, 11:02:47 pm »


Prior to Twin Peaks, Cooper's strongest romantic relationship was his affair with Caroline Earle, the wife of his former partner, Windom Earle. Caroline had been under Cooper and Earle's protection for witnessing a federal crime that Earle committed when he lost his mind, but on one night when Cooper's guard was down, Caroline was murdered by Windom. He tried to kill Cooper for having an affair with her but barely survived. Caroline's death and his failure to protect her continues to haunt Cooper on his arrival to Twin Peaks, referring to a "broken heart" when discussing women with Truman and his deputies. He also relates the story of Caroline to the teenage Audrey Horne.

On arrival to Twin Peaks, Cooper becomes quickly aware that 18 year-old Audrey Horne, the daughter of local businessman Benjamin Horne, harbours a crush on him. The attraction initially appears mutual, as Cooper is clearly drawn to Audrey - but he is quick to rebuff her advances when Audrey turns up in his hotel bed. Cooper explains she is part of a case he is working on and too young, but that he does genuinely want to be her friend. However, following her disappearance (orchestrated by Jacques Renault), Cooper privately confesses to Diane that in Audrey's absence all he can think of is her smile. Following her rescue, there remains a deeply affectionate - almost close - friendship with the two, most notably when Audrey arrives to his hotel room for comfort following her father's arrest and her sad farewell when she believes Cooper is leaving Twin Peaks for good. They also slow-dance at the Milford wedding.

However, during the production of the series' second season, Kyle MacLachlan (as he notes during an interview on the 2007 Gold Edition Twin Peaks DVD set) vetoed the possibility of a romantic relationship, as he felt his character should not sleep with a high school girl. It is also alleged this was due to pressure from his co-star and then-girlfriend, Lara Flynn Boyle. [citation needed] Following the series' cancellation, it is often said by the show's writers that the Cooper-Audrey relationship was to be the main plot following the resolution of the Laura Palmer murder mystery - and forcing them to focus more on the supporting characters. [citation needed]

Following his reinstatement to the FBI, Cooper meets Annie Blackburn, the sister of Norma Jennings, whom he instantly falls in love with. Annie is established as being a kindred spirit to Cooper, experiencing the world with curiosity and wonder. Much like how Cooper is recalling his pain over Caroline Earle, Annie is also nursing a broken heart from someone in her past. (Which is implied may have resulted in suicide attempts, and affected her decision to later attend a monastery). Cooper helps her to prepare for participation in the Miss Twin Peaks contest. However, she is taken to the Black Lodge by Windom Earle to use her 'fear' to open the gateway, (and most likely became of relationship to Cooper).

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #25 on: November 11, 2007, 11:05:37 pm »


*Special Agent Dale Cooper grew up in Philadelphia (according to Season 2, Episode 18, as well as a book, The Autobiography of F.B.I. Special Agent Dale Cooper: My Life, My Tapes, written by Scott Frost, the brother of the series' producer Mark Frost, providing background information about Cooper). On arriving in Twin Peaks, Cooper quotes W.C. Fields, saying 'I'd rather be here than Philadelphia'. This is no coincidence, since this is where David Lynch lived in the Eraserhead era. Lynch has claimed many times that Philadelphia has had a strong influence on his worldview.

*Kyle MacLachlan apparently could not stand cherry pie, unlike his character. As MacLachlan said in an interview: "I hate cherry pie! Always have, always will!"

*The name of Dale Cooper might have been inspired by the mysterious "D.B. Cooper" who, in 1971, hijacked an airliner leaving Seattle and jumped from the plane with $200,000 dollars strapped to his chest, never to be seen again.

*In a Sesame Street "Monsterpiece Theater" skit, the Cookie Monster played a Dale Cooper-esque character investigating how the town of Twin Beaks got its name, unable to connect this to the fact that all the town's inhabitants (including "David Finch") are birds with two beaks.

*In The Simpsons episode "Who Shot Mr. Burns? Part Two" (2F20, 17 September 1995), Chief Wiggum has a dream that resembles Dale Cooper's dream in which Lisa talks backwards to reveal clues. The chief awakens from his dream with his hair mussed like Cooper's bed hair after his awakening. In the episode "Lisa's Sax" (3G02, 19 October 1997), a flashback to 1990 shows Homer watching the show as Dale Cooper remarks, "That's some damn fine coffee you got here in Twin Peaks... and damn good cherry pie." The Giant is then shown waltzing with a horse, under a tree with a traffic light hanging from a branch. Homer's opinion of the show is "Brilliant!... I have absolutely no idea what's going on."
Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #26 on: November 11, 2007, 11:08:31 pm »



Character: FBI Agent Dale Cooper
Profession: FBI Special Agent
Birthdate: April 19, 1954
Remarks: Otherwise known as 'Coop'. Very partial to dougnuts and strong, black coffee by which any hotel, particularly The Great Northern, can be judged. Intrigued by Tibet and Annie Blackburn.

   
Actor: Kyle MacLachlan 
Birthdate: February 22, 1959
Location: Yakima, Washington, USA


http://www.cenedra.com/coop.htm
Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #27 on: November 11, 2007, 11:12:12 pm »


Harry S. Truman


Sheriff Harry S. Truman is a fictional character on the 1990-1991 primetime ABC series Twin Peaks, played by actor Michael Ontkean. He assists Special Agent Dale Cooper in the investigation of the murder of Laura Palmer. Series creator David Lynch has stated that the character was not named for American president Harry S. Truman, but rather for Washington state resident Harry Truman who died in the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Yet the fictional Harry's middle initial is 'S' (as demonstrated in dialogue and by the sign on his office door visible in several episodes) whereas the volcano victim Truman's middle initial was 'R'.

Harry is in love with fragile Josie Packard, and he is one of the Bookhouse Boys.

Harry gets on well with Cooper. They hit it off almost from the start. Harry is very down-to-earth in contrast with Cooper's unconventional methods of policing, fascination with Tibet, dreams, etc. Harry regards Cooper as somewhat eccentric but well-meaning. In early episodes, Harry serves to introduce Cooper (and hence the viewer) to the more prominent residents of Twin Peaks. Harry begins to feel that he is the Dr Watson to Cooper's Sherlock Holmes. Despite their differences, Truman represents a literary alternate to Cooper: they approach the same goal through different means.

As the case progress, Harry's respect for Cooper grows. He regards Coop as "the finest lawman he has ever known".

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #28 on: November 11, 2007, 11:32:09 pm »



Laura Palmer

Laura Palmer is a fictional character played by Sheryl Lee on the David Lynch/Mark Frost television series Twin Peaks. Her death was the catalyst for the events of the series.

 
Laura was her town's favorite daughter; she volunteered at Meals on Wheels, was the high school Homecoming queen, and was (apparently) the darling of her parents, Sarah and Leland. However, Laura led a double life — she was a **** user, a victim of child abuse and had briefly worked at One Eyed Jacks, a casino/brothel just north of the Canadian border.

The discovery of Laura's body in the pilot episode of Twin Peaks brought Special Agent Dale Cooper to town and the investigation of her death, and the effects it had on those around her, propelled the first season and the first 15 episodes of the second season. Laura remained prominent afterward, as her death had exposed many secrets related to her, and also — in some cases — unrelated, such as the Packard mill conspiracy.

Laura's diary was uncovered in the first episode, but her secret diary was not recovered until later, and it contained passages suggesting that she had long been the victim — sometimes willingly — of abuse from a malevolent entity named BOB, who wanted to be close to her, or even be her.

During the second season, the identity of her murderer was revealed: her father, Leland, who had been possessed by BOB and made to molest, ****, and kill his own daughter. When Leland dies in prison, it is implied that Laura appears before him in a vision, forgiving him and welcoming him to the afterlife.

Report Spam   Logged
Jami Ferrina
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2135



« Reply #29 on: November 11, 2007, 11:34:20 pm »



•   Sheryl Lee also played Laura's cousin, Maddy Ferguson, who arrived in town in the third episode for Laura's funeral. At one point Maddy poses as dead Laura to lure Dr. Jacoby.
•   One of the best-known musical pieces from the show was the leitmotif Laura's Theme, composed by Angelo Badalamenti. This was sampled in the Top Ten hit Go by Moby.
•   Jennifer Lynch wrote an official series tie-in, The Secret Diary of Laura Palmer, which was sold from 1990 and was the diary used in the series.
•   Swallow the Sun, a doom metal band, wrote a song called "The Ghost of Laura Palmer", probably derived from the character.
•   Terminaator, a rock band from Estonia, has a song called "Veel on aega". There is a reference to Laura and Twin Peaks in lines "Laura Palmer mõrvati | Väikelinn kuid elab edasi", which means "Laura Palmer was murdered | But a small town lives on".
•   Laura's iconic Homecoming portrait (shown above) was originally Sheryl Lee's prom photo in real life. Several versions of it exist and are used throughout the series and follow-up/prequel Fire Walk With Me.
•   Amanda Palmer's solo debut album is entitled "Who Killed Amanda Palmer", which is a reference to Laura Palmer's death and the investigation thereof.
•   The band Fantômas covered the theme song for the film Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me on their Directors Cut album.
•   During the evacuation of Saigon, April, 1975, Hunter S. Thompson left the Global Affairs Suite in the hands of a Laura Palmer. See Thompson's "Fear and Loathing in America," c. 2000.
•   The Band Skycamefalling has a song entitled Laura Palmer on their album 10.21.
•   The band Kick Asteroid recorded a single entitled "She's Full Of Secrets" in obvious homage to the character and the series as a whole.
•   A song called Our Energy by the artist Cyberstorm features lyrics referring to Laura Palmer. It can be found on John 00 Fleming's 2000 DJ mix album For Your Ears Only in the form of a Plastic Angel remix. The lyrics, spoken in a German or Dutch accent, are as follows: There is a secret diary on which Laura used to write whatever happened to her. The killer's initials are on it. People still don't know who killed Laura Palmer but I know who did. I know the murderer. I happen to know a secret. Everyone lives in fear. I know the murderer.
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy