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Halloween (film series)


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Michael Myers
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« Reply #30 on: October 31, 2007, 03:57:32 pm »



The masks created by Don Post were featured in a 1982 article in The Twilight Zone Magazine.

When approached about creating a third Halloween film, original Halloween writers John Carpenter and Debra Hill were reluctant to pledge commitment. According to Fangoria magazine, Carpenter and Hill agreed to participate in the new project only if it was not a direct sequel to Halloween II, which meant no Michael Myers.[5] Irwin Yablans and Moustapha Akkad, who had produced the first two films, filmed Halloween III on a budget of $2.5 million.[1]

Special effects artist Don Post of Post Studios designed the latex masks in the film which included a glow-in-the-dark skull, a lime-green witch and an orange Day-Glo jack-o'-lantern.[6][7] Hill told Aljean Harmetz, "We didn't exactly have a whole lot of money for things like props, so we asked Post, who had provided the shape mask for the earlier 'Halloween [II] ..., if we could work out a deal."[8] The skull and witch masks were adaptations of standard Post Studios masks, but the jack-o'-lantern was created specifically for Halloween III. Post linked the masks of the film to the popularity of masks in the real world:

Every society in every time has had its masks that suited the mood of the society, from the masked ball to clowns to makeup. People want to act out a feeling inside themselves—angry, sad, happy, old. It may be a sad commentary on present-day America that horror masks are the best sellers.[8]

Most of the filming took place on location in the small coastal town of Loleta in Humboldt County, California. Familiar Foods, a milk bottling plant in Loleta, served as the Silver Shamrock Novelties factory, but all special effects involving fire, smoke, and explosions were filmed at Post Studios.[7]

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Michael Myers
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« Reply #31 on: October 31, 2007, 03:58:24 pm »


Producers recruited Manx science fiction writer Nigel Kneale to write the original screenplay mostly because Carpenter admired his Quatermass series. Kneale said his script did not include "horror for horror's sake." He adds, "The main story had to do with deception, psychological shocks rather than physical ones." Kneale asserted that movie mogul Dino De Laurentiis, owner of the film's distribution rights, did not care for it and ordered more graphic violence and gore. While much of the plot remained the same, the alterations displeased Kneale, and he requested that his name be removed from the credits. Director Tommy Lee Wallace was then assigned to revise the script.[9]

Wallace told Fangoria that he created the title of the film as a reference to "a plot point"—the three masks featured in the film—and an attempt to connect this film with the others in the series. He explained in the interview the direction that Carpenter and Hill wanted to take the Halloween series, stating, "It is our intention to create an anthology out of the series, sort of along the lines of Night Gallery, or The Twilight Zone, only on a much larger scale, of course." Each year, a new film would be released that focused on an aspect of the Halloween season.[10]

Debra Hill told Fangoria that the film was supposed to be "a 'pod' movie, not a 'knife' movie."[11] As such, Wallace drew inspiration from another pod film: Don Siegel's Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956). Santa Mira was the fictional setting of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and the name was adopted for Halloween III as an homage to Siegel's film.[8] Aspects of the plot proved very similar as well, such as the "snatching" bodies and replacing them with androids. Halloween III's subtitle comes from George A. Romero's second film Season of the Witch (1973)—also known as Hungry Wives—but the plot contains no similarity to Romero's story of a housewife who becomes involved in witchcraft.[4]

Film critics like Jim Harper called Wallace's plot "deeply flawed." Harper argues, "Any plot dependent on stealing a chunk of Stonehenge and shipping it secretly across the Atlantic is going to be shaky from the start." He noted, "there are four time zones across the United States, so the western seaboard has four hours to get the fatal curse-inducing advertisement off the air. Not a great plan."[4] Harper was not the only critic unimpressed by the plot. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times wrote, "What's [Cochran's] plan? Kill the kids and replace them with robots? Why?"[12]

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Michael Myers
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« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2007, 03:59:54 pm »




Tom Atkins as Dr. Dan Challis in the last scene of Halloween III.

The cast of Halloween III: Season of the Witch consisted mostly of character actors whose previous acting credits included small roles or bit parts on various television series. The exceptions were Tom Atkins and veteran actor Dan O'Herlihy.

Cast as alcoholic doctor Daniel "Dan" Challis, Tom Atkins had appeared in several John Carpenter films prior to Halloween III. Atkins played Nick Castle in The Fog (1980) and Rehme in Escape from New York (1981). Atkins guest starred in television series such as Harry O, The Rockford Files and Lou Grant. Atkins told Fangoria that he liked being the hero. As a veteran horror actor, he added, "I wouldn't mind making a whole career out of being in just horror movies."[13] After Halloween III, Atkins continued to play supporting roles in dozens of films and television series.[14]

Stacey Nelkin co-starred as Ellie Grimbridge, a young woman whose father is murdered by Silver Shamrock. She landed the role after a make-up artist working on the film told her about the auditions. In an interview, Nelkin commented on her character: "Ellie was very spunky and strong-minded. Although I like to think of myself as having these traits, she was written that way in the script." Nelkin considered it an "honor" to be playing Jamie Lee Curtis's successor.[15] According to Roger Ebert, Nelkin's performance was the "one saving grace" in the film. Ebert explained, "She has one of those rich voices that makes you wish she had more to say and in a better role... Too bad she plays her last scene without a head."[12] Prior to her role as Grimbridge, Nelkin played only bit parts in television series like CHiPs and The Waltons. After Halloween III, Nelkin continued working as a character actress on television.[16]

Veteran Irish actor Dan O'Herlihy was cast as Conal Cochran, the owner of Silver Shamrock and the witch from the film's title (a 3000-year-old demon in Kneale's original script).[5] O'Herlihy had played close to 150 roles before co-starring as the Irish trickster and was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance in The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1954). He appeared in another twenty films and television series before his death in 2005.[17] O'Herlihy admitted in an interview with Starlog magazine that he was not particularly impressed with the finished film. When asked what he thought of working in the horror film, O'Herlihy responded, "Whenever I use a Cork accent, I'm having a good time, and I used a Cork accent in [Halloween III]. I thoroughly enjoyed the role, but I didn't think it was much of a picture, no."[18]

Two members of the supporting cast were not strangers to the Halloween series. Nancy Kyes played Challis's ex-wife Linda; she had appeared in the original Halloween as Laurie Strode's promiscuous friend Annie Brackett. Stunt performer Dick Warlock makes a cameo appearance as the android assassin. Warlock had earlier co-starred as Michael Myers in Halloween II.[19]

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Michael Myers
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« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2007, 04:01:20 pm »



The film was the directorial debut of Tommy Lee Wallace, although he was not a newcomer to the Halloween series. Wallace had served as art director and production designer for John Carpenter's original Halloween and he had previously declined to direct Halloween II in 1981. After Halloween III, Wallace directed other horror films such as Fright Night II (1988), Vampires: Los Muertos (2002), and the miniseries It (1990), the television adaptation of the Stephen King novel.

Despite disagreements between Wallace and original script writer Nigel Kneale, the actors reported that Wallace was a congenial director to work with. Stacey Nelkin told one interviewer, "The shoot as a whole was fun, smooth and a great group of people to work with. Tommy Lee Wallace was incredibly helpful and open to discussion on dialogue or character issues."[15]

Although the third film departed from the plot of the first two films, Wallace attempted to connect all three films together through certain stylistic themes. The film's opening title features a digitally animated jack-o'-lantern, an obvious reference to the jack-o'-lanterns that appeared in the opening titles of Halloween and Halloween II. Wallace's jack-o'-lantern is the catalyst in the Silver Shamrock commercials that activates the masks. Another stylistic reference to the original film is found in the scene where Dr. Challis tosses a mask over a security camera, making the image on the monitor seem to be peering through the eye holes. This is a nod to the scene in which a young Michael Myers murders his sister while wearing a clown mask.[20] Finally, the film contains a brief reference to its predecessors by including a few short scenes from Halloween in a television commercial that advertises the airing of the film for that upcoming holiday as a minor story within a story.

Wallace's use of gore served a different purpose than in Halloween II. According to Tom Atkins, "The effects in this [film] aren't bloody. They're more bizarre than gross."[21] Special effects and makeup artist Tom Burman concurred, stating in an interview, "This movie is really not out to disgust people. It's a fun movie with a lot of thrills in it; not a lot of random gratuitous gore."[22] Many of the special effects were meant to emphasize the theme of the practical joke that peppers the plot. New York Times film critic Vincent Canby notes, "The movie features a lot of carefully executed, comically horrible special effects ...." Canby stood as one of the few critics of the time to praise Wallace's directing: "Mr. Wallace clearly has a fondness for the clichés he is parodying and he does it with style."[23]

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Michael Myers
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« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2007, 04:02:59 pm »




John Carpenter (left) and Alan Howarth composed most of the soundtrack to Halloween III using synthesizers.

Music remained an important element in establishing the atmosphere of Halloween III. Just as in Halloween and Halloween II, there was no symphonic score. Much of the music was composed to solicit "false startles" from the audience.

The soundtrack was composed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth, who had worked on the score for Halloween II. The score of Halloween III differed greatly from the familiar main theme of the original and sequel. Carpenter replaced the familiar piano melody with a slower, electronic theme played on a synthesizer with beeping tonalities.[24] Howarth explains how he and Carpenter composed the music for the third film:

The music style of John Carpenter and myself has further evolved in this film soundtrack by working exclusively with synthesizers to produce our music. This has led to a certain procedural routine. The film is first transferred to a time coded video tape and synchronized to a 24 track master audio recorder; then while watching the film we compose the music to these visual images. The entire process goes quite rapidly and has "instant gratification," allowing us to evaluate the score in synch to the picture. This is quite an invaluable asset.[25]

One of the more memorable aspects of the film's soundtrack was the jingle from the Silver Shamrock Halloween mask commercial. Set to the tune of "London Bridge is Falling Down," the commercial in the film counts down the days until Halloween beginning with day eight followed by an announcer's voice (Tommy Lee Wallace) encouraging children to purchase a Silver Shamrock mask to wear on Halloween night:

Eight more days 'til Halloween,
Halloween, Halloween.
Eight more days 'til Halloween,
Silver Shamrock.[26]


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Michael Myers
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« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2007, 04:04:37 pm »


Halloween III: Season of the Witch opened in 1,297 theaters in the United States on October 22, 1982, and earned $6,333,259 in its opening weekend. Like its predecessor, the film was distributed through Universal by Italian producer Dino De Laurentiis. It grossed a total of $14,400,000 in the United States,[1] but was the worst performing Halloween film at the time.[2] Several other horror films that premiered in 1982 performed far better, including Poltergeist ($76,606,280), Friday the 13th Part 3 ($34,581,519), and Creepshow ($21,028,755).[27] Internationally, the film premiered in the United Kingdom, Norway, Spain, West Germany, Sweden, France, Canada, Australia, and Singapore.

In 1983, Edd Riveria, designer of the film's theatrical poster, received a Saturn Award nomination from the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA, for Best Poster Art, but lost to John Alvin's E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982) artwork.[28] Riveria's poster art featured a demonic face descending on three trick-or-treaters. His artwork was later featured on the cover of Fangoria in October 1982. Oddly enough, no creature even remotely resembling the face on the theatrical poster appears in the film.

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« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2007, 04:06:14 pm »



Edd Riveria's Halloween III artwork featured on the cover of Fangoria.

As part of a merchandising campaign, the producers requested Don Post to mass-produce the skull, witch, and jack-o'-lantern masks. Producers had given exclusive merchandising rights to Post as part of his contract for working on the film, and Post Studios had already successfully marketed tie-in masks for the classic Universal monsters, Planet of the Apes (1968), Star Wars (1977), and E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1981). Post used the original molds for the masks in the film to mass produce masks for retail sale. He speculated, "Because the masks are so significant to the movie, they could become a cult item, with fans wanting to wear them when they go to see the movie." Post gave mask-making demonstrations for a Universal Studio tour in Hollywood. The masks retailed for $25 when they finally appeared in stores.[8]

The script was adapted as a mass market paperback novelization in 1982 by science-fiction writer Dennis Etchison writing under the pseudonym Jack Martin. The book was a best seller and was reissued in 1984.[29] Etchison wrote the novelization to Halloween II only a year before.

The film was later released on VHS, laserdisc, and CED format in 1983 by MCA/Universal Home Video. Subsequent videotape re-issues were released in 1984, 1987, and 1996. GoodTimes Home Video owned the rights at one point and released a VHS in 1996. DVD versions were distributed by Goodtimes in 1998 (with a re-issue in 2001) and Universal in 2003.

The film's soundtrack, composed by John Carpenter and Alan Howarth and released by Varese Sarabande, is extremely hard to find today, and those copies found carry pricetags ranging from 80 dollars to several hundred dollars due to its rareness.

The film's soundtrack is now scheduled to be released as an expanded limited edition of 1,000 units on October 29th, 2007. It will be distributed through Buysoundtrax.com on AHI Records.
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Michael Myers
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« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2007, 04:08:25 pm »



Critical response to Halloween III: Season of the Witch proved to be mixed. New York Times reviewer Vincent Canby struggled to apply a definite label to the film's content. He remarks, "'Halloween III' manages the not easy feat of being anti-children, anti-capitalism, anti-television and anti-Irish all at the same time." On the other hand, he says that the film "is probably as good as any cheerful ghoul could ask for."[23] Other critics were far more decisive in their assessments. Roger Ebert wrote that the film was "a low-rent thriller from the first frame. This is one of those Identikit movies, assembled out of familiar parts from other, better movies."[12] Cinefantastique magazine called the film a "hopelessly jumbled mess."[30] Jason Paul Collum points to the absence of Michael Myers and the film's nihilistic ending as reasons why the film dissatisfied reviewers and audiences alike. Halloween III remains the only film in the Halloween series in which the villain is not defeated and evil plan foiled.[31]
Tom Milne of Time Out, a British magazine, offered a more positive review, calling the title "a bit of a cheat, since the indestructible psycho of the first two films plays no part here." Unlike other critics, Milne thought the new plot was refreshing: "With the possibilities of the characters [of the previous Halloween films] well and truly exhausted, Season of the Witch turns more profitably to a marvellously ingenious Nigel Kneale tale of a toymaker and his fiendish plan to restore Halloween to its witch cult origins." Although Milne was unhappy that Kneale's original script was reduced to "a bit of a mess," he still believed the end result was "hugely enjoyable."[32]
Academics find the film full of critiques of late twentieth-century American society. Historian Nicholas Rogers points to an anti-corporate message where an otherwise successful businessman turns "oddly irrational" and seeks to "promote a more robotic future for commerce and manufacture." Cochran's "astrological obsessions or psychotic hatred of children overrode his business sense."[33] Tony Williams argues that the film's plot signified the results of the "victory of patriarchal corporate control."[34] In a similar vein, Martin Harris writes that Halloween III contains "an ongoing, cynical commentary on American consumer culture." Upset over the commercialization of the Halloween holiday, Cochran uses "the very medium he abhors as a weapon against itself." Harris references other big business critiques in the film, including the unemployment of local workers and the declining quality of mass produced products.[35]

References
1.   ^ a b c Halloween III at BoxOfficeMojo.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
2.   ^ a b Halloween Franchise Box Office Records atBoxOfficeMojo.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
3.   ^ Adam Rockoff, Going to Pieces: The Rise and Fall of the Slasher Film, 1978–1986 (Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2002), p. 42, ISBN 0-7864-1227-5.
4.   ^ a b c Jim Harper, Legacy of Blood: A Comprehensive Guide to Slasher Movies (Manchester, Eng.: Critical Vision, 2004), p. 103, ISBN 1-900486-39-3.
5.   ^ a b Ellen Carlomagno, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch: An On-The-Set Report On The Ambitious Sequel to Carpenter's Classic!," Fangoria, #22, October 1982, p. 8, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
6.   ^ Don Post at Internet Move Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
7.   ^ a b "Behind the Scenes" of Halloween III, at HalloweenMovies.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
8.   ^ a b c d Aljean Harmetz, "'Halloween III' Masks to Help Scare Up Sales," New York Times, 16 October 1982, p. 12.
9.   ^ Nigel Kneale, interview with Starburst 4.11 (July 1983): p. 32, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
10.   ^ Tommy Lee Wallace interview, in Carlomagno, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch," p. 8, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
11.   ^ Debra Hill interview, Carlomagno, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch," p. 8, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
12.   ^ a b c Roger Ebert, review of Halloween III: Season of the Witch, Chicago Sun-Times, 31 October 1982, at RogerEbert.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
13.   ^ Tom Atkins interview, in Carlomagno, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch," p. 9, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
14.   ^ Tom Atkins at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
15.   ^ a b Stacey Nelkin interview, Jason Paul Collum, Assault of the Killer B's: Interviews with 20 Cult Film Actresses (Jefferson, N.C.: MacFarland & Company, 2004), pp. 133–134, ISBN 0-7864-1818-4.
16.   ^ Stacey Nelkin at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
17.   ^ Dan O'Herlihy at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
18.   ^ Dan O'Herlihy interview, "The Man Alone," Starlog, #278, April 2001, in Tom Weaver, Science Fiction Confidential: Interviews with 23 Monster Stars and Filmmakers (Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2002), p. 232, ISBN 0-7864-1175-9.
19.   ^ Halloween III, Full Credits at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
20.   ^ Collum, Attack of the Killer B's, p. 133.
21.   ^ Tom Atkins interview, quoted at HalloweenMovies.com
22.   ^ Tom Burman interview, Ellen Carlomagno, "The Effects of Halloween III: Tom Burman Tells All About His Special Makeup Work for the Latest From Carpenter-Hill," Fangoria, #23, November 1982, p. 8, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
23.   ^ a b Vincent Canby, "Film: 'Halloween III,' Plotting a Joke," New York Times, 22 October 1982, p. C28.
24.   ^ "Soundtrack" of Halloween III at HalloweenMovies.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
25.   ^ Alan Howarth, quoted at TheOfficialJohnCarpenter.com; last accessed April 27, 2006
26.   ^ Plot, Halloween III at HalloweenMovies.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
27.   ^ "1982 Domestic Grosses, at BoxOfficeMojo.com; last accessed April 27, 2006.
28.   ^ Saturn Award nominations, Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films, USA: 1983, at the Internet Movie Database; last accessed April 27, 2006.
29.   ^ Jack Martin, Halloween III: Season of the Witch, (New York: Jove Books, 1982), ISBN 0-515-06885-3; 1984 reissue, ISBN 0-515-08594-4.
30.   ^ Michael Mayo, "Hack rewrite turns Kneale's treat into dreary chaos. Some trick," Cinefantastique 13.4 (1982): p. 57, available here; last accessed April 27, 2006.
31.   ^ Collum, Assault of the Killer B's, p. 133.
32.   ^ Tom Milne, review of Halloween III: Season of the Witch, Time Out, reprinted in 2nd ed., 1991, p. 277.
33.   ^ Nicholas Rogers, Halloween: From Pagan Ritual to Party Night (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002), p. 111, ISBN 0-19-516896-8.
34.   ^ Tony Williams, Hearths of Darkness: The Family in the American Horror Film (Madison, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1996), p. 219, ISBN 0-8386-3564-4.
35.   ^ Martin Harris, "You Can't Kill the Boogeyman: Halloween III and the Modern Horror Franchise," Journal of Popular Film and Television 32.3 (Fall 2004): pp. 104–105.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_III:_Season_of_the_Witch
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Michael Myers
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« Reply #38 on: October 31, 2007, 04:13:19 pm »



Theatrical release poster
Directed by Dwight H. Little
Produced by Moustapha Akkad
Paul Freeman
Written by Screenplay:
Alan B. McElroy
Story:
Danny Lipsius
Larry Rattner
Benjamin Ruffner
Alan B. McElroy
Starring Donald Pleasence
Ellie Cornell
Danielle Harris
Beau Starr
George P. Wilbur
Sasha Jenson
Music by Alan Howarth
Cinematography Peter Lyons Collister
Editing by Curtiss Clayton
Distributed by Galaxy International Releasing
Release date(s) October 21, 1988
Running time 88 min.
Country  United States
Language English
Budget $5 million
Gross revenue $17,768,757
Preceded by Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982)
Followed by Halloween 5 (1989
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Michael Myers
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« Reply #39 on: October 31, 2007, 04:16:08 pm »


Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers is a 1988 independently-released horror film and the 4th in the Halloween series. The film revolves around Michael Myers once more after his absence in Halloween III: Season of the Witch. Directed by Dwight H. Little, the film stars Ellie Cornell as Rachel Carruthers, Donald Pleasence as Dr. Loomis, Danielle Harris as Jamie Lloyd, and George P. Wilbur as Michael Myers.

The central plot focuses on Michael Myers 10 years after his 1978 killing spree in Haddonfield, Illinois. It is revealed he is comatose and barely alive at the Ridgemont Federal Sanitarium, and his sister Laurie Strode has been killed in a car accident. While Michael is being transferred to Smith's Grove, he escapes and goes to Haddonfield where he attempts to kill his niece Jamie Lloyd—revealed to be Laurie's daughter.[1]

The film was a moderate box office success, an improvement on the unsuccessful Halloween III, but a failure compared to the original Halloween, and the 1981 sequel. Produced on a budget of only $5 million, the film opened in 1,679 theaters, and grossed $6,831,250 in its opening weekend achieving a total domestic gross of $17,768,757 in the United States, becoming the fifth best performing film in the Halloween series.[2] Halloween 4 has received a mixed critical reception.

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Michael Myers
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« Reply #40 on: October 31, 2007, 04:19:32 pm »



Jamie after stabbing her foster mother.

Michael Myers has been in a coma since the events of Halloween II, when his massacre was stopped by Dr. Sam Loomis and Laurie Strode. At the beginning of this film, Myers is being transferred from Ridgemont Federal Sanitarium to Smith's Grove Sanitarium. He awakens when he hears that Laurie Strode, his sister, is deceased, but her daughter is alive and well in Haddonfield. He kills the ambulance crew and escapes. Dr. Loomis races to Haddonfield in an attempt to bring Myers' killing spree to an end once and for all.

In Haddonfield, his niece Jamie Lloyd (played by Danielle Harris), has been adopted by the Carruthers family. She has frequent nightmares about Michael, though she does not know who he is. On Halloween night, Jamie goes out trick-or-treating dressed as a clown (a costume that is very similar to the one worn by young Michael Myers at the beginning of the first Halloween film) with her teenage foster sister Rachel Carruthers (played by Ellie Cornell). Her uncle, Michael, follows them.

Dr. Loomis, meanwhile, arrives in Haddonfield after an exhausting journey, and contacts the police department to inform them of Myers' disappearance. He and Haddonfield's new Sheriff Ben Meeker (played by Beau Starr) begin to search the town for Michael and Jamie. They find that Myers has singlehandedly annihilated the entire police force. The girls hide in the Sheriff's house, where Michael follows them. They escape and leave Haddonfield, but Myers hides in the back of the truck that they use to escape. The sheriff's deputies catch up to them and shoot Michael relentlessly. He falls into an abandoned mine shaft which collapses on him when the deputies throw dynamite down the shaft.

Back at the Carruthers house, Jamie puts on her clown mask and stabs her foster mother. It turns out that she was possessed by Myers' rage. Dr. Loomis attempts to shoot her, but Sheriff Meeker prevents it. The film ends with a shot of Jamie, wearing the clown mask, holding bloody scissors. This shot is very similar to the shot near the beginning of the original Halloween, where young Michael Myers is seen holding a bloody knife after killing his older sister, Judith.


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« Reply #41 on: October 31, 2007, 04:21:19 pm »


Halloween 4 was directed by Dwight H. Little. This was only his 4th film to direct, and was his first and only time to be involved in the Halloween series.[3] After viewing a rough edit it was decided that the movie was too soft, so they brought in special effects wizard John Carl Buechler for one day of extra "blood" filming. The thumb in the forehead and the redneck's head getting twisted were both done by him.

The film was shot in 42 days in and around Salt Lake City, Utah.

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« Reply #42 on: October 31, 2007, 04:24:47 pm »


The original screenplay featured Jamie killing her adoptive older sister in similar fashion to how Michael killed his older sister, Judith, in the first Halloween. Alan B. McElroy wrote the script in 11 days in order to beat the writer's strike.

John Carpenter was actually first approached by Cannon Films to do a Halloween 4 around 1986 after the studio produced The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2. Although the idea to do a Leatherface vs. Michael Myers movie was rejected, it did spark interest in reviving the series. Soon after, Carpenter and fellow writer Dennis Etchison began writing the script for the fourth Halloween. While a direct sequel to Halloween & Halloween II, the script did not feature a living, breathing Michael Myers. More of a ghost story, the fear and angst of the adults in Haddonfield allowed The Shape to reappear, causing a kind of "psychic disturbance" in the town. However, Akkad rejected it, calling it "too cerebral" and insisting any new Halloween movie must feature Myers as a flesh and blood killer. At this point, Carpenter washed his hands of the series and sold all of his remaining rights to Akkad.[4]

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« Reply #43 on: October 31, 2007, 04:26:40 pm »


Produced on a budget of only $5 million, the film opened in 1,679 theaters, and grossed $6,831,250 in its opening weekend achieving a total domestic gross of $17,768,757 in the United States, becoming the fifth best performing film in the Halloween series.[2]

Halloween 4 has received a moderate (sometimes positive) critical reception. It was criticized for not having anything "striking, interesting, or exceptionally memorable" besides the ending.[8]


Leslie L. Rohland played an unsolved name problem. When Rachel talks about her character in the car she says, "Jamie, you remember Lindsey, don't you?" or "Jamie, you remember Leslie, don't you?" Fans say that the name is Lindsey Wallace from the first film but in the credits, it is billed as Leslie. In the DVD commentary, the writer of the film states that it was his intention for the character to be Lindsey Wallace.

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« Reply #44 on: October 31, 2007, 04:28:00 pm »

Jamie Lloyd (1980-1995) is a fictional character in Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988), Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers (1989), and Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers (1995). Jamie Lee Curtis was asked to return as Laurie Strode for the fourth film, but declined for another film project. She asked that the writers just write she had died in an automobile accident. Instead, the fourth film introduced Laurie's daughter. Jamie Lloyd is named after actress Jamie Lee Curtis. As the daughter of Laurie, she is also the niece of superhuman killer Michael Myers. She was played by Danielle Harris in Halloween 4 and Halloween 5 and by J.C. Brandy in Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers.

Jamie Lloyd was born in Haddonfield, Illinois in either 1980 or 1981. Her biological mother is Laurie Strode, and while her father is never identified within the Halloween universe, it is widely accepted by fans to be Jimmy of Halloween II origin, portrayed by Lance Guest.

It is vaguely implied (in H4) that in November 1987, both of Jamie's parents died in an automobile accident.

For the next eleven months, Jamie would suffer from nightmares about her uncle Michael; whom she had never met. She gradually comes to love her surrogate family - her foster parents Richard and Darlene Carruthers, and especially their daughter Rachel, her seventeen-year-old foster sister.

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