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Halloween (film series)


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Michael Myers
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« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2007, 03:18:36 pm »


Halloween II boasted a much larger budget than its predecessor: $2.5 million. Halloween producers Irwin Yablans and Moustapha Akkad invested heavily in the film even though John Carpenter refused to direct. Most of the film was shot at Morningside Hospital in Inglewood, California, and Pasadena Community Hospital in Pasadena, California.[3] There was discussion of filming Halloween II in 3-D; writer and producer Debra Hill said, "We investigated a number of 3-D processes ... but they were far too expensive for this particular project. Also, most of the projects we do involve a lot of night shooting—evil lurks at night. It's hard to do that in 3-D."[3]


The screenplay of Halloween II was written by John Carpenter and Debra Hill, the writers of the first Halloween. Hill mentioned in a 1981 interview with Fangoria magazine that the finished film differs somewhat from initial drafts of the screenplay. She explained how she and Carpenter had originally considered setting the sequel a few years after the events of Halloween. They planned to have Myers track Laurie Strode to her new residence in a high-rise apartment building.[2]

The sequel was intended to conclude the story of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode. Neither Carpenter nor Hill were involved in writing material for later sequels. The third film, Halloween III: Season of the Witch, released a year later, contained a plot that deviated wholly from that of the first two films.[2] Tommy Lee Wallace, the director of Halloween III, stated "It is our intention to create an anthology out of the series, sort of along the lines of Night Gallery, or The Twilight Zone, only on a much larger scale, of course."[4] When asked, in a 1982 interview, what happened to Myers and Loomis, Carpenter flatly answered, "The Shape is dead. Donald Pleasence's character is dead, too, unfortunately."[5]

Film critic Roger Ebert notes that the plot of the sequel was rather simple: "The plot of Halloween II absolutely depends, of course, on our old friend the Idiot Plot, which requires that everyone in the movie behave at all times like an idiot. That's necessary because if anyone were to use common sense, the problem would be solved and the movie would be over."[6] Characters were described as shallow and like cardboard. Hill rebuffed such critiques by arguing that "in a thriller film, what a character says is often irrelevant, especially in those sequences where the objective is to build up suspense."[7]

Historian Nicholas Rogers suggests that a portion of the film seems to have drawn inspiration from the "contemporary controversies surrounding the holiday itself."[8] He points specifically to the scene in the film when a young boy in a pirate costume arrives at Haddonfield Memorial Hospital with a razor blade lodged in his mouth, a reference to the urban legend of tainted Halloween candy.[9] According to Rogers, "The Halloween films opened in the wake of the billowing stories about Halloween sadism and clearly traded on the uncertainties surrounding trick-or-treating and the general safety of the festival."[8]

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