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Raphael at the National Gallery

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Rorie LaFay
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« on: July 14, 2007, 06:19:04 am »


The first major exhibition of works by the great Renaissance painter Raphael in the UK opens at the National Gallery, London, on Wednesday. This is a cartoon for the Mackintosh Madonna, dating from about 1509-11.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/3750578.stm
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2007, 06:20:14 am »


The Madonna of the Pinks, which was saved from export when the National Gallery raised 22m, is the centre of the exhibition.
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2007, 06:21:26 am »


Raphael started as a competent master of provincial church decoration and became one of the greatest painters who ever lived. The Garvagh Madonna, above, was painted in about 1509-10.
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2007, 06:22:30 am »

He was born in Urbino in 1483 and received his first instruction in the techniques of painting from his father, Giovanni Santi, a minor artist. Saint Sebastian, above, is from 1502-3.
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2007, 06:23:35 am »


Raphael spent four years in Perugia, learning from master Perugino before leaving his workshop in 1504. This painting shows The Holy Family with the Lamb, about 1507.
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2007, 06:25:06 am »


In his early works, Raphael remained faithful to the Perugino School. This image shows Saint Michael, painted about 1503-4.
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Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2007, 06:26:09 am »


In 1504, Raphael went to Florence and was influenced by a great debate about the future of art at the time. An Allegory (Vision of a Knight) was painted about 1504.

Raphael was influenced by Michelangelo and Leonardo as this image, Leda and the Swan (after Leonardo), about 1515, shows. Raphael died just five years later.


« Last Edit: July 14, 2007, 06:27:46 am by Rorie » Report Spam   Logged
Rorie LaFay
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« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2007, 06:27:17 am »


Raphael was influenced by Michelangelo and Leonardo as this image, Leda and the Swan (after Leonardo), about 1515, shows. Raphael died just five years later.
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rockessence
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« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2007, 09:39:27 pm »

My friend Sarah has a connection to Raphael....she told me a great story of her past life, as a girl raised in a cloister...the illigitimate child of a priest and a nun.  The nuns commissioned Raphael to paint an alterpiece and the painter used the girl as the model for the Virgin Mary.  She became pregnant with his child and when he died she stood by his casket......   I found the following about the Colonna Alterpiece:

The Colonna Altarpiece was painted for a chapel of the Franciscan nuns of Sant'Antonio di Padova in Perugia. According to Italian biographer Giorgio Vasari (1511-1574), the conservative cloistered community requested that the infant Jesus and young Saint John the Baptist be painted fully clothed. The seated majestic Madonna with her voluminous mantle, the Christ Child and His infant cousin are portrayed on a tiered and canopied throne in the middle of a meadow, flanked by four saints (Peter, Paul, Catherine of Alexandria and a female one still unidentified). In true Renaissance fashion, the figures are arranged in a sacra conversazione (sacred conversation). Suspended in time, all of them inhabit the same pictorial space but do not necessarily communicate with one another in this splendid example of devotional painting. Raphael's pyramidal organization of the main panel's three solidly modeled protagonists anticipates a number of the artist's later compositions that were inspired, in part, by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519).


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ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
rockessence
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« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2007, 12:50:35 pm »



Isn't he beautiful?
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ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
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