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Pompeii: New find shows man crushed trying to flee eruption

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« on: May 29, 2018, 10:12:46 am »


ompeii: New find shows man crushed trying to flee eruption



Originally published May 29, 2018 at 6:12 am  |  Updated May 29, 2018 at 6:31 am 
 


https://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/pompeii-new-find-shows-man-crushed-trying-to-flee-eruption/


The legs of a skeleton emerge from the ground beneath a large rock believed to have crushed the victim’s bust during the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’s archeological site, near Naples, on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. The skeleton was found during recent excavations and is believed to be of a 35-year-old man with a limp who was hit by a pyroclastic cloud during the eruption. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)

Anthropologist Valeria Amoretti works with a brush on a skeleton of a victim of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’ archeological site, near Naples, on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. The skeleton was found during recent excavations and is believed to be of a 35-year-old man with a limp who was hit by a pyroclastic cloud during the eruption. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)

Anthropologist Valeria Amoretti works with a brush on a skeleton of a victim of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’ archeological site, near Naples, on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. The skeleton was found during recent excavations and is believed to be of a 35-year-old man with a limp who was hit by a pyroclastic cloud during the eruption. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)

Anthropologist Valeria Amoretti works with a brush on a skeleton of a victim of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’ archeological site, near Naples, on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. The skeleton was found during recent excavations and is believed to be of a 35-year-old man with a limp who was hit by a pyroclastic cloud during the eruption. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)

Anthropologist Valeria Amoretti looks at a skeleton of a victim of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’ archeological site, near Naples, on Tuesday, May 29, 2018. The skeleton was found during recent excavations and is believed to be of a 35-year-old man with a limp who was hit by a pyroclastic cloud during the eruption. (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)


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 The legs of a skeleton emerge from the ground beneath a large rock believed to have crushed the victim’s bust during the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in A.D. 79, which destroyed the ancient town of Pompeii, at Pompeii’s... (Ciro Fusco/ANSA via AP)  More 













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By  The Associated Press 
The Associated Press
 
MILAN (AP) — Officials at the Pompeii archaeological site have announced a dramatic new discovery, the skeleton of a man crushed by an enormous stone while trying to flee the explosion of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D.

Pompeii officials on Tuesday released a photograph showing the skeleton protruding from beneath a large block of stone that may have been a door jamb that had been “violently thrown by the volcanic cloud.”





The victim, who was over 30, had his thorax crushed. Archaeologists have not found the victim’s head. Officials said the man suffered an infection of the tibia, which may have caused walking difficulties, impeding his escape.
 


The archaeological site’s general director, Massimo Osanna, called it “an exceptional find,” that contributes to a better “picture of the history and civilization of the age.”






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