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Cryptid creatures from dark domains

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Author Topic: Cryptid creatures from dark domains  (Read 117 times)
Pax Unum
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« on: November 14, 2016, 12:30:24 am »

BLACK SHUCK AND THE SHUG MONKEY IN RENDLESHAM FOREST – AND, YES, YOU'VE HEARD OF THAT PLACE BEFORE!

According to Redfern, perhaps the most famous of all of the phantom hounds of old Britain are those that are said to have frequented, and in some cases still frequent, the ancient roads and pathways of Norfolk, Essex, Suffolk and Sussex. Their various names include Black Shuck, the Shug Monkey and the Shock. The Shuck and the Shock are classic black dogs, whereas the Shug Monkey is described as being a combination of spectral monkey and immense hound.

"Even their very names have intriguing origins," Redfern writes. "While some researchers consider the possibility that all of the appellations had their origins in the word ‘Shucky,' an ancient east coast term meaning ‘shaggy,' others suggest a far more sinister theory, namely that Shock, Shuck and Shug are all based upon the Anglo-Saxon ‘scucca,' meaning ‘demon,' a most apt description for sure."

In the winter of 1983, a couple in their twenties, Paul and Jayne Jennings, encountered a black dog in Rendlesham Forest, home to Britain's most famous UFO encounter, the December 1980 event in which numerous personnel from the nearby Royal Air Force Bentwaters military base encountered a UFO in the woods. Like Nigel Lea's witnessing a glowing blue light before his face-to-face meeting with a black dog, the close proximity of the military's UFO incident creates a tenuous connection between both phenomena. [Memo: Go to our Mr. UFO Secret Files YouTube channel for the exclusive story - ]

The Jennings were walking along a trail in the Rendlesham Forest when, according to Redfern, they saw what Jayne described as a "big black dog that kept appearing and disappearing." When Redfern asked her to elaborate, she explained that on rounding a bend on the path they came face to face with the dog, which was a huge creature whose head was unmistakably that of a large hound while the body, strangely, was more feline in nature.

The dog was not aggressive, and seemed to have a mournful expression on its face. But the Jennings were shocked when it vanished in the blink of an eye. They were even more shocked when a moment later it reappeared and proceeded to "flicker on and off" four or five times before vanishing permanently. After the dog's disappearance, the air was filled with a strange smell that resembled "burning metal." Could it be the fires of hell, to which the mournful-looking dog was dispiritedly returning? And what of the possible Rendlesham connection? Are the weird goings-on there proof that this might be what John Keel once determined to be a "window area" to another dimension?

THE HOUNDS IN MYTHOLOGY

Further along in his chapter, Redfern tells the story of the Wild Hunt and even wilder hounds. He quotes the famed crypto-zoologist Jon Downes: "Belief in the Wild Hunt is found not only in Britain but also on the Continent, and the basic idea is the same in all variations: a phantasmal leader and his men accompanied by hounds who ‘fly' through the night in pursuit of something. What they are pursuing is not clear; although Norse legend has various objects such as a visionary boar or wild horse, and even magical maidens known as Moss Maidens.

"Greek myth has Hecate roaming the Earth on moonless nights with a pack of ghostly, howling dogs and the phenomenon has also been reported from Germany, where, according to folklore, the procession includes the souls of unbaptized babies in the train of ‘Frau Bertha,' who sometimes accompanied the wild huntsman."

(The mythic apparition of the Wild Hunt is said to resemble, and may have inspired, a well-known Country and Western song called "Riders in the Sky," in which a band of ghostly cowboys is condemned forever to chase a herd of cattle across the sky yet never actually catch them. The song has been recorded by the likes of Johnny Cash, Gene Autry, Bing Crosby and Peggy Lee, as well as a later rock version by The Outlaws.)

Downes explains that the hounds are universally believed to be portents of war, death and disaster, and an unfortunate traveler who heard one would fling himself face downward to the ground to avoid seeing the beast. The Devil's hunting pack, and the related phenomenon of the Devil Dogs, have been reported on more occasions during years of warfare than at any other time.
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