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Man builds message-receiving 'time machine'

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Stellaraxe
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« on: November 07, 2015, 01:55:44 am »

Man builds message-receiving 'time machine'
Posted on Tuesday, 3 November, 2015 |



Is it possible to receive messages from the future ? Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 aussiegall
A physics professor is constructing a time machine capable of picking up messages from the future.
When it comes to science fiction technologies, time travel is proving to be a tough nut to crack.

While the concept has featured heavily over the years in science fiction films and TV shows such as Back to the Future, Dr Who and Star Trek, most scientists subscribe to the belief that travelling backwards in time and interacting with past events is fundamentally impossible.

But what if instead of travelling in to the past you could simply send a message ?

This is the basis for a new machine being developed by Ronald Mallett, a physics professor at the University of Connecticut. Inspired by reading the H.G. Wells classic The Time Machine, Mallett is hoping to build a device that can pick up communications sent back from the future.

The contraption, which will cost an estimated $250,000 to build, could open the floodgates to a vast network of data being sent back in time for the people of the present to read and benefit from.

"By using a circulating beam of laser light, I have been able to mathematically show that this can lead to a twisting of space and time," he said.

Whether the finished device will ever actually pick anything up however remains to be seen.

   
Source: Discovery News
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Stellaraxe
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 01:56:53 am »

http://news.discovery.com/tech/could-a-time-machine-deliver-messages-to-the-past-151102.htm
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Stellaraxe
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 01:58:27 am »



You can’t get a text message from a friend if you don’t own a phone. And you can’t get a message from the future unless you have a machine capable of receiving it.

That’s exactly the kind of machine University of Connecticut physics professor Ronald Mallett has in mind.

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For years Mallett kept his time travel research a secret. He told the Hartford Courant that his father’s death in 1955 from a heart attack and reading the H.G. Wells’ novel “The Time Machine” first inspired him to study time travel. As a child he wanted to go back in time and save his dad.

While he’s said that kind of physical time travel isn’t possible, Mallett does think he could build a time machine that can receive messages from our descendants — children who aren’t born yet. Future generations could use Mallett’s machine to get in touch, which means as soon as we plugged in the machine, we could get a message.

Strangely, the more I read about the man’s ideas, the less crazy they sound.

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Riffing on Einstein’s work and the U.S. Naval Observatory’s flying clocks experiment, Mallett theorizes that light can alter time. “By using a circulating beam of laser light, I have been able to mathematically show that this can lead to a twisting of space and time,” he told Langley. A stream of neutron spins could transmit binary code back to the past.

The caveats: Messages would only go one way into the past. And they couldn’t be sent to any time before the machine exists.

Mallett estimated that his design for a machine that would use lasers to twist time would cost around $250,000 to build. Other physicists including Ken Olum at Tufts and Columbia University’s Brian Greene have been rightly skeptical. But Green told TechRadar he hopes the man succeeds anyway.

Brian Cox: Time Travel is Easy! Kinda

If this whole thing sounds ripe for the big screen, it’s no surprise that Spike Lee is writing a script based on Mallett’s autobiography. Meanwhile, $250K doesn’t seem like that much dough to receive a message from the future. Unless, of course, the message just says, “Check your connection and try again later.”

via Tech Radar
Tags time machine time physics einstein Tech
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Derek
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« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2015, 12:43:54 am »

My list of reasons as to why no message is received is obviously not exhaustive. For example, people in the future may simply be too lazy to bother sending messages back in time. I was in fact attempting to be a little bit jokey, but have failed in that regard.
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Stellarpax
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« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2015, 12:45:23 am »

There's more fundamental problems. Say you build the machine and send a message Tuesday to your past self, and he recieves the message Monday. When 24 hours pass, the Monday you does not become the Tuesday you who sent the message, because it is now Wednsday for the Tuesday you who sent the message. The you who sent the message will always remain in the future, the you who recieved the message will always remain in his past and can never become him.
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Openheimer
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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2015, 12:46:57 am »

The problem of space moving is only true if space is purely mathematical. If space is real, as relativity theories suggest, then space drags along with matter where matter is dense. The space in a laboratory is not likely to drift through matter, especially if the laboratory is located underground. Thus, a radio transceiver built to send signals through time could receive signals it sent in the same basement without worry of the signal drifting somewhere else.
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"Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds." - the Bhagavad Gita
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2015, 12:48:16 am »

If I want to send something forward or backwards in time (assuming that is possible) and want it to appear in the same place here on Earth (say, in a lab) I would have to take into account the Earth's rotation on it's axis, the Earth's movement around the Sun, the Sun's movement through the Galaxy, the Galaxy's movement, and so on. I don't quite see what that has to do with space dragging.
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Zalmoxis
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2015, 12:49:53 am »

I was listening to an audio play the other day that did just this and touched upon the implications. The characters were relatively au fait with time travel to begin with (they were mates of Doctor Who), they did things like send letters to their younger selves encouraging them (one of them remembered being in a rather black place, until an odd letter arrived telling him to invest in a theatre, which lead to him owning said theatre and being the master of ceremonies for stage performances, which lead eventually to him meeting the Doctor etc.
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Behold, I am Death, Destroyer of Worlds
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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2015, 12:51:27 am »

For those interested, perhaps one could try think about how small the information packets might be limited. In the anime Steins Gate, it was explored through text messages which were pretty interesting and how timelines would eventually diverge. However, upon receiving a new message, the protagonist is the only one with "memory" between timelines that bifurcated with different messages sent to the past. I don't believe we would have one person "memory-conscious" as different messages are received:
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She-ra, Princess of Power
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2015, 12:53:08 am »

Yeah! I would love to see an academic research project that would coordinate an paranormal event location (global positioning satellites) and time (UTC). With that information the project coordinator could inspect the data to see if events track geometrically and/or if they perhaps have synchronicnicity over local and/or long range distances from one another. If random not much would be learned, however, if some kind of pattern emerges, there might be a great deal of further experimental information that could be scientifically garnered.
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She-ra, Princess of Power
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2015, 12:53:31 am »

How on earth did I get into this multiple entry mess... Maybe it is a message from the future... hummm... Monitor please delete the multiples THANKS!
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