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Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' come true ?

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« on: October 12, 2015, 02:07:14 am »

Is ‘The Day After Tomorrow' Scenario Possible? Study Says Collapse Of Ocean Currents Could Reverse Global Warming Effects

By Ted Ranosa, Tech Times | October 11, 6:23 AM
Floods

A new study conducted by a University of Southampton researcher suggests that a collapse of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, such as the one depicted in the 2004 disaster film ‘The Day After Tomorrow', is a possibility as a result of continued warming of the Earth.
(Photo : Nate & Tilly Ritter | Flickr)

When director Roland Emmerich's disaster film "The Day After Tomorrow" came out in 2004, moviegoers were treated to a world where the Earth's climate has undergone drastic changes that resulted in a series of extreme weather conditions ravaging heavily populated cities.

By the time the climate events ended, the Earth was engulfed in global cooling and many people were left to live in a new ice age.

While Emmerich's film is widely considered a product of Hollywood fiction writers filled with scientific inaccuracies, a recent study conducted by a researcher in the United Kingdom suggests that such a catastrophic scenario is indeed a possibility if climate warming manages to cause ocean currents in the world to collapse.

Sybren Drijfhout, a professor at the University of Southampton, said that a collapse of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) could occur as a result of the continued warming of the Earth.

In his study, featured in the journal Scientific Reports, Drijfhout made use of the Max-Planck Institute's state-of-the-art climate model called ECHAM to predict possible climate scenarios.

He discovered that if global warming occurs simultaneously with the AMOC's collapse in a period of 20 years, the planet would begin to cool rather than to continue to warm. Global warming would continue thereafter as if the AMOC's collapse never occurred, but with the average temperature of the world being offset by 0.8 degrees Celsius.

"The planet earth recovers from the AMOC collapse in about 40 years when global warming continues at present-day rates, but near the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic (including the British Isles) it takes more than a century before temperature is back to normal," Drijfhout said.

The findings of the study show that the AMOC collapse's atmospheric cooling effect is linked to the flow of heat from the Earth's atmosphere into the ocean. This event was recently observed during the climate hiatus over the past 15 years.

Drijfhout explained that this heat flow is reversed when a cooling of the planet occurs as a result of a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions or volcanic eruptions. Instead of the flow moving from the atmosphere into the Earth's oceans, it moves from large bodies of water into the atmosphere.

He added that a similar energy flow reversal can also be observed in the atmosphere.

Drijfhout said that such unique energy flow fingerprints between internal ocean circulation processes and atmospheric radiative forcing can be viewed as a potential cause of a climate hiatus.

The researcher, however, noted that the findings shown in the climate study suggest that the recent period of moderate climate warming cannot be attributed to a singular cause.

He said that other climate events likely have caused this reduction in warming as well as the El Niño phenomenon and the increasing and shifting westerlies in the Southern Ocean.

Photo: Nate & Tilly Ritter | Flickr

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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2015, 02:08:18 am »

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/93812/20151011/is-the-day-after-tomorrow-scenario-possible-study-says-collapse-of-ocean-currents-could-reverse-global-warming-effects.htm
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Jennifer Murdoch
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2015, 02:09:31 am »

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' come true ?
Posted on Sunday, 11 October, 2015




Could the world be plunged in to a new ice age ? Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Paul Anderson
The events of the hit Roland Emmerich disaster movie may actually become a reality in the coming decades.
The 2004 movie saw the world plagued by a series of apocalyptic climate disasters ranging from tornadoes tearing up Los Angeles to extreme cooling and the beginning of a new ice age.

While the events of the film might seem far-fetched, some aspects of it might actually have a ring of truth to them - that is at least according to Sybren Drijfhout, a professor at the University of Southampton, who suggests that such a catastrophic scenario could actually happen for real.

In his new study, Drijfhout contends that if global warming continues over the next few decades then a collapse of warm ocean currents in the Atlantic - the same thing that caused the northern hemisphere to freeze in the movie - might actually become a realistic possibility.

Known as Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), this crucial water current helps maintain milder winters and its disappearance could see temperatures plunging rapidly.

"The planet earth recovers from the AMOC collapse in about 40 years when global warming continues at present-day rates, but near the eastern boundary of the North Atlantic (including the British Isles) it takes more than a century before temperature is back to normal," said Drijfhout.

Whether such a thing is likely to actually happen however remains to be seen, but as the effects of global warming continue to take their toll on our planet it may only be a matter of time before this, or something very much like it, will be along to give world governments a rather stark wake up call.
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freetoroam
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2015, 02:42:31 am »

Without having read the article I will just assume it is a detailed report on how a giant ship floated down very narrow streets to end up enclosed in a part urban plaza.
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Xomon
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2015, 02:44:46 am »

If one want to read some very interesting historical information, try the author Velikosky (if I spell it right!), amazing analysis of yesterday events our Planet Earth over. And from his many conclusions, it's plausible that very powerful events happened on Earth, so I would think Yes, ''The Day after Tomorrow'' will come some day, hope it won't be in our timeline! We understand that we are Earth-nauts, we live on a SpaceShip circling the Sun, held up together in the MilkyWay, whose Galaxy is held up together by a Massive Wormhole holding millions of other Galaxies.
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Okane
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« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2015, 02:45:55 am »

When I was in school, they first said this would happen, without any doubt's, in 1992. Then it was 2000 would see world catastrophe climate change, then it was 2002, then 2012 then 2020. Stuff happens. Its nature.
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Quark
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2015, 12:23:45 am »

If I remember right, that indicates Venus goes through periods of resurfacing right? Also evidence that unlike Mars it still has active geology.
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Forms of Things Unknown
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« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2015, 12:25:44 am »

Yeppers, catastrophic lithospheric overturn. At least that's the thought. It can't release heat effectively, cause it has a relatively "thick lid" (dry, strong, and thick lithosphere)-and no plate tectonics in consequence. Unlike Earth, where plate tectonics facilitates heat release. So, eventually, heat builds up at that boundary (lithosphere/mantle) since it's failing to get released through the surface effectively. The thick lid is more dense than the hot mantle below it, so it sinks! And then the upper mantle crusts up and Venus has a new surface.
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Out of Sight, Out of Mind
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« Reply #8 on: October 19, 2015, 12:27:06 am »

If I remember right, the crust of Venus is thinner than Earth's, and due to the heat the rocks have greater plasticity. Is that considered part of the reason for lack of tectonic plates?
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Paradox
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« Reply #9 on: October 19, 2015, 12:28:49 am »

The crust is pretty thick on Venus. And the lithosphere (the upper portion of the mantle + the crust) is thick too. And pretty uniform. Based on the distribution of topography (unimodal). The Earth's distribution of topography (bimodal) indicates plate tectonic processes. One of the main reasons, actually, for the lack of plate tectonics is believed to be the comparative difference in water content of the interior. Water has a major influence on rock strength/melt temperature. Venus has less water than Earth (is what accretion models indicate), so it has a strong, thick lithosphere.
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the Joker
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« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2015, 12:30:24 am »

They do say there's a El Nino out there that could bring triple the snow we had last year, gee the U.S. was a Antarctica last year:)
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Quasar
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« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2015, 12:31:36 am »

Young, yes, compared to some other planetary surfaces, but the resurfacing nevertheless happened a long time ago -- before the Cambrian explosion in fact. All the evolution of multi-cellular life on Earth happened after.
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Okane
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« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2015, 12:33:21 am »

It was in New England and the lake states and even Minnesota and North Dakota (North Dakota always looks like Antarctica in the winter.). But in California, it was as dry as ever. In OK we lucked out. Got a mild winter followed by a mild summer.
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