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Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?

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Author Topic: Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?  (Read 966 times)
Keira Kensington
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« Reply #60 on: April 06, 2015, 05:07:35 pm »



Dr. Thomas Neill Cream (1850-1892)

Born in Scotland in May of 1850, Cream was the oldest of eight brothers and sisters. The family moved to Canada four years later. On November 12, 1872, Cream registered at McGill College in Montreal as a medical student. He would graduate with honors on March 31, 1876.

Soon after, he was to meet a Flora Elizabeth Brooks, whose father own a prosperous hotel in Waterloo. She soon became the victim of an unwanted pregnancy, and Cream took it upon himself to perform his own abortion, nearly killing Brooks. Her father was understandably enraged, and insisted they marry, which Cream did on September 11, 1876. The next day he left for England, where he registered as a graduate student at St. Thomas's Hostpital in London. He also obtained a qualification from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons at Edinburgh.

Cream returned to Canada a few years later, and, undaunted by his previous mishap, began a career as an abortionist. His reputation was quite promising until the body of a young chambermaid named Kate Gardener was discovered at Cream's office, a bottle of chloroform lying beside her. Luckily for Cream, he was not charged with murder, despite the harrowing evidence against him.

Perhaps finally rustled by his near-escape, he took his business into Chicago, but his murderous tendancies again began to show. In August of 1880, Julia Faulkner died under mysterious circumstances, and Cream was arrested on charges of murder -- he escaped conviction again.

When Cream wasn't murdering women and aborting babies, he took it upon himself to market his own person elixir to combat epilepsy, and soon acquired quite a following by a number of patients who swore by the treatment. One of them, a railway agent named Daniel Stott, made the mistake of sending his wife to Cream's office for regular doses of the drug. Julia Stott received much more from the good Doctor than just medicine on each of her visits, and when her husband finally became suspicious of the affair, Cream decided to add a bit of strychnine to the medicine. Mr. Stott died on June 14, 1881, and had it not been for a move of grand stupidity by his killer, Cream would have gotten away "Stott" free.

Originally, Stott's death was attributed to epilepsy, but for some reason Cream wrote to the coronor stating that the pharmacist was responsible for his death, and requested an exhumation. The coronor dismissed the letter, but the D.A. went on a limb and ordered the body to be exhumed -- strychnine was found in his stomach and Dr. Cream's luck finally ran out. He was imprisoned in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.
   
      
   
Dr. Thomas Neill Cream

Although it was a life sentence, Cream was released on good behavior on July 31, 1891. He took a quick trip to Canada to collect an inheritance of $16,000 and left for England, eventually to end up in the South London slums.

Only two days after his arrival, he met a prositute named Matilda Clover, who was later to die from nux vomica poisoning. The same fate befell an Ellen Donworth. But as in his first two murders, Cream was uncharged.

After a short break from his murders (and an even shorter attempt at love with a woman named Laura Sabbatini), Cream was to poison two women: Alice Marsh and Emma Shrivell. He would again have escaped detection, had it not been for another unexplicable action: he took it upon himself to accuse his neighbor of the two murders, even going so far as to try his hand at extortion. He said that he had incriminating evidence again a Joseph Harper, and that for no less than 1,500 pounds he would not share his knowledge with the police. Harper refused, and Cream soon lost interest in the attempt.

Yet he refused to forget about the murders -- he soon bragged to others about his vast knowledge on the two murders, even going so far as to take a John Haynes on a tour of the murder scenes! He then did the same to a Mr. McIntyre, who turned out to be a police sergeant, and began surveilance on the doctor. Furthermore, a P.C. Cumley (who had seen Cream with the two girls on the night of their deaths) happened to come upon this "tall gentleman with cross-eyes and bushy whiskers" and also began to watch him. His attempts to blackmail Harper were soon revealed to police, and Cream was finally arrested.

He was charged and found guilty of the death of Matilda Clover, and was sentenced to hang on November 15, 1892. It was there that he would perform his last (and perhaps most inexplicable) action -- he is said to have uttered "I am Jack..." as the noose fell taut and squeezed the life out of his body. As the Ripper murder scare was still in full force, the immediate assumption was that Cream had confessed to being Jack the Ripper.

http://www.casebook.org/suspects/cream.html
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #61 on: April 06, 2015, 05:08:02 pm »



The execution of Dr. Thomas Neill Cream
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« Reply #62 on: April 06, 2015, 05:08:48 pm »

Here, and only here, is his connection to the case.

According to Donald Rumbelow, in The Complete Jack the Ripper, the fact that Cream uttered these words (an event which was sworn to by the hangman) should be suspicious, since the new Commissioner of the City of London Police, Sir Henry Smith, had attended the hanging. He was later to have boasted that he knew more than anyone else about the Ripper case in his autobiography, and yet no mention is made of this occurrence.

Even more damning is the fact, often quoted, that Cream was serving a prison sentence from 1881 to 1891 in Joliet, Illinois. Most claim, therefore, that he could not possibly have been the murderer, as all murders were committed in 1888.

Yet a good Ripper theory dies hard, and new theorists proposed that Cream actually had a double. The two would help each other by the one being in prison while the other was free committing crimes, using his double's prison sentence as an alibi. Those who support this theory believe this is evident early on in Cream's criminal career, when brought into court on charges of bigamy. He was advised to plead guilty, but refused to do so, claiming he was serving a prison sentence in Sydney at the time. Sure enough, the prison was asked if someone fitting his description was indeed there and they replied in the affirmative. In his biography, Marshall Hall (who defended Cream) is said to have believed that Neill Cream had a double in the underworld and they went by the same name and used each other's terms of imprisonment as alibis for each other.

Therefore, while Cream was in Joilet prison, his double would have been able to commit the Whitechapel crimes -- on the day of his execution, Cream knew he had no chance for survival and decided to free his double by confessing to his crimes.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #63 on: April 06, 2015, 05:09:32 pm »

It is also theorized that the corruption which ran rampant in the prisons of Chicago resulted in Cream's being released as a result of a bribe, allowing himself to commit the murders in Whitechapel while the crooked officials swore he was still in prison. Proponents also claim his handwriting (seen at right) matches the handwriting of two of the Ripper letters.

Also neither of these theories can be truly disproved, most refute the theory on grounds that Cream, like Chapman, was a poisoner, not a mutilator. It would make little sense for him to poison his victims before 1888, suddenly go on a murderous and vicious mutilating spree in that year, and then revert back to poisoning his women. His prison sentence adds only more fire to the arguments of the skeptics.

http://www.casebook.org/suspects/cream.html
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #64 on: April 06, 2015, 05:09:56 pm »



Dr. Thomas Neill Cream's handwriting.
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« Reply #65 on: April 06, 2015, 05:11:37 pm »

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« Reply #66 on: April 06, 2015, 05:30:36 pm »



Like Jack the Ripper, Dr. Thomas Neill Cream preyed on streetwalkers.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #67 on: April 06, 2015, 05:31:41 pm »


Doctor death
BY Mara Bovsun
special To The News
Tuesday, March 25, 2008, 6:25 PM


As homicidal Victorian ghouls go, Jack the Ripper had nothing on Dr. Thomas Neill Cream.

In fact, to this day there are those who will swear that the mysterious sex-slayer and the Canadian-trained physician were one and the same. Perhaps it had something to do with the principal target - London's streetwalkers.

Or perhaps it had something to do with Cream's last words, which, legend has it, were uttered as the gallows trapdoor opened and sent him plunging into the hereafter.

"I am Jack ...."

The noose choked off the end of the sentence and sparked more than a century of speculation.

Born in Scotland in 1850, Cream was a young boy when his family moved to Canada.

After studying medicine at McGill University, he married, and then set up a practice in London, Ontario. The marriage did not last long. Within a year, his young wife succumbed to a mysterious illness.

Cream ended up in Chicago, where he established an unsavory specialty - ending unwanted pregnancies for prostitutes. In 1880 he had his first serious brush with the law when one of his patients died.

Fingered but freed

Cream was tried for murder, and the principal witness against him was a black midwife who sometimes assisted him. The jury gave little weight to the midwife, and Cream went free.

A year later he was in trouble again. This time the victim was an elderly epileptic, Daniel Stott, who had become a regular patient after medicine Cream prescribed eased his fits.

Sometimes Stott's beautiful wife, Julia, would come to pick up the medicine. Romance soon erupted between Julia, who was three decades younger than her husband, and the doctor.

In June 1881, Julia came to Cream's office, as usual, for her husband's medicines. Cream wrote two prescriptions. One was for calomel, a mercury-based compound, used in the mid-19th century as a laxative. The other was for capsules filled with herbs and a smidge of strychnine, which was often used in those days as a stimulant.

Cream insisted that Julia go out of her way to Buck & Rayners, clear across town. Then, instead of heading home to her invalid husband, she returned to Cream's office, where he enhanced the formulas.

A few days later, Daniel Stott took his medicine and was dead within a half hour.

Stott was buried, and the matter forgotten, until a telegram arrived at the coroner's office.

"I want you to have a postmortem examination made of the body of Dan Stott .... Have stomach examined. Suspect foul play."

A day later, another telegram arrived. After a third, the coroner contacted the writer. It was Dr. Cream.

The doctor said a fortune-teller had told him that Stott had been poisoned, and that the druggist was at fault. He suggested giving some of Stott's leftover medicine to a dog.

When the dog died, Stott's body was exhumed. His stomach contained enough strychnine to kill six grown men.

Cream tried to pin Stott's death on the pharmacy, but was soon on trial for murder and was convicted and given life.

After a decade in jail, Cream's father died and left him a sizable inheritance - enough to convince a prison official the convict had been redeemed.
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« Reply #68 on: April 06, 2015, 05:32:42 pm »

In the summer of 1891 Cream was declared worthy of clemency. He visited his family in Canada, and then vanished.

Déjà Slew

In October, a Dr. Thomas Neill popped up in a London that was reeling from the horrific unsolved Jack the Ripper slayings of three years earlier. Weeks after the newcomer's arrival, prostitutes started to die again.

On Oct. 13, Ellen Donworth fell in a fit of violent convulsions on Waterloo Road. She told a police officer that she had received a note instructing her to meet a prospective client on the street. When she arrived, she met a tall, cross-eyed man with gold spectacles and a mustache. He offered her a drink from a bottle of white liquid.

Donworth died on the way to the hospital, poisoned by strychnine.

A week later, another prostitute, Matilda Clover, was found writhing in her bed, raving that one of her clients, a tall man with a mustache, had given her pills.

Police had not connected these deaths to the odd stranger who had moved into a flat on Lambeth Place Road.

Meanwhile, odd letters started showing up around town. One was a blackmail note to Frederick Smith, son of a wealthy businessman. The letter threatened to expose Smith as Donworth's killer. To avoid exposure, Smith was to paste a sign on his office window, saying: "Mr. Fred Smith wishes to see Mr. Bayne, the barrister, at once."

Smith turned the letter over to the police, who filed it along with some other odd communications, mostly blackmail threats to wealthy men.

The murders stopped when Cream took a trip home to visit his brother in Canada in January. He arrived back in London the following spring.

On April 11, a roominghouse landlady was awakened by shrieks in the middle of the night. She found one of her tenants, Alice Marsh, in agony on the floor in the hallway. In a room upstairs, another boarder, Emma Shrivell, was in the same condition. Marsh lived long enough to tell police that she and Shrivell had gone out with a tall, cross-eyed man who had given them each three "long pills."

Mystery letter

Days later, a doctor, Joseph Harper, received a letter. The author said that he had "indisputable evidence" that Harper's son had killed Marsh and Shrivell. "I am willing to give you said evidence [so you can suppress it] for the sum of 1,500 pounds sterling."

Harper handed the letter over to Scotland Yard. More tips poured in, but Neill did not become a suspect until he attended a party where he met Sgt. Patrick McIntyre, and launched into an attack on the police. McIntyre, impressed by the man's detailed knowledge of the case, as well as the striking resemblance he bore to the descriptions given by the victims, checked into Neill's background and discovered the name Thomas Neill Cream.

The doctor was soon under police scrutiny, then under arrest, charged with the murders of four women.

His trial, only for the murder of Clover, opened on Oct. 17, 1892. Most damning were the doctor's own words. Police did not think Clover had been poisoned until Cream, in his chats with McIntyre, linked her name to the girls known to have been poisoned. Only after Clover's body had been exhumed did police realize that it was not liquor, but strychnine, that had killed her.

The jury took 10 minutes to find him guilty.

Cream's hanging was a private affair, and no one knows whether he actually used his last breath to utter his odd confession.

It seems unlikely that Cream committed the Ripper slayings, since he was in jail in another country at the time. Some maintain, however, that there is evidence that Cream paid a double to serve his sentence in Chicago, and that he actually made it to London in the mid-1880s.

Wild as this notion seems, Cream still appears on lists of suspects, along with Lewis Carroll and Prince Albert Victor, and 30 or so others thought to have been Jack the Ripper.

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/crime/doctor-death-article-1.241690
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« Reply #69 on: April 06, 2015, 05:57:28 pm »

    
   
   
Francis Tumblety

Francis Tumblety (1833-1903)
a.k.a. J.H. Blackburn, Frank Townsend

Very little information has been ascertained about Tumblety’s beginnings, his birthplace being the first of many mysteries surrounding this new suspect. According to Evans and Gainey’s 1995 edition of Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer (pg. 188) he was born in Canada, while the most recent edition (1996) of The Jack the Ripper A-Z (pg. 453) lists his birthplace as Ireland. Even the exact year of his birth is still in question. In any event, he was born to James and Margaret Tumblety sometime around 1833, the youngest of eleven children: Patrick, Lawrence, Jane and Bridget (twins), Alice, Margaret, Ann, Julia, Elizabeth, and Mary.

Sometime within the next decade (this date, too, is undetermined), the Tumblety clan moved to Rochester, New York. The city directories first enumerate the Tumblety name (which has various spellings: Tumblety, Tumuelty, Tumility, Twomblety, et alia) in 1844 with Lawrence Tumuelty, listed as a gardener, living at the corner of Sophia and Clarissa streets. The other brother, Patrick, first is seen in the directory of 1849, listed as a fireman at Rapids in Rochester, and living at 6 Andrews. It was recently discovered that Francis’s father (named James, not Frank, as was noted in earlier editions of Evans and Gainey) died on May 7th, 1851.

Our first impressions of the young Francis begin around 1848, when neighbors and acquaintances thought him 'a dirty, awkward, ignorant, uncared-for, good-for-nothing boy... utterly devoid of education.' He was also known to peddle pornographic literature on the canal boats of Rochester. Sometime in adolescence he also began working at a small drug store run by a Dr. Lispenard, said to have 'carried on a medical business of a disreputable kind (Rochester Democrat and Republican, Dec.3, 1888).'

Around 1850 (just before the death of his father), Francis left Rochester, perhaps for Detroit. Here he started his own practice as an Indian herb doctor, which must have prospered since from 1854 onward he always appeared as if of considerable wealth.

He next turns up in Montreal in the fall of 1857, where he again made himself known as a prominent physician. Controversy brewed, however, when he was asked to run in the provincial elections of 1857-8. He declined the offer in what would become typical Tumblety fashion; with a grandiose and overbearing explanation in the local newspaper. But there was more: Tumblety was arrested on September 23, 1857 for attempting to abort the pregnancy of a local prostitute named Philomene Dumas. It was alleged that he sold her a bottle of pills and liquid for the purpose, but after some legal haggling Tumblety was released on October 1. A verdict of ‘no true bill’ was reached on the 24th and no trial was ever undertaken.

In either early 1858 (A-Z, 453) or July 1860 (Evans and Gainey, 258), Tumblety left Montreal for Saint John. In September of 1860, he again found trouble when a patient of his named James Portmore died while taking medicine prescribed by Tumblety. In his typical brazen fashion, Tumblety showed up at the coroner’s inquest and questioned Portmore’s widow himself as to the cause of death. The ruse didn’t work, however, and Tumblety made a last-ditch attempt at freedom by fleeing the town for Calais Maine.

From there he travelled to Boston, where he began what would be a long-running trademark: he would wear a military outfit and ride a white steed, sometimes leading two greyhounds before him. He didn’t remain long in Boston, however, and would soon travel and work in New York, Jersey City, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and a variety of other cities. With the outbreak of the American Civil War, Tumblety moved to the capital and put on the airs of a Union army surgeon, claiming to be friends with President Lincoln, General Grant, and a host of other well-known political figures. It was at this time that Tumblety’s alleged hatred for women became most pronounced, as seen in the testimony of a Colonel Dunham, who was one night invited to dinner by Tumblety:
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« Reply #70 on: April 06, 2015, 05:57:52 pm »

 "Someone asked why he had not invited some women to his dinner. His face instantly became as black as a thunder-cloud. He had a pack of cards in his hand, but he laid them down and said, almost savagely, 'No, Colonel, I don’t know any such cattle, and if I did I would, as your friend, sooner give you a dose of quick poison than take you into such danger.' He then broke into a homily on the sin and folly of dissipation, fiercely denounced all women and especially fallen women.

He then invited us into his office where he illustrated his lecture so to speak. One side of this room was entirely occupied with cases, outwardly resembling wardrobes. When the doors were opened quite a museum was revealed -- tiers of shelves with glass jars and cases, some round and others square, filled with all sorts of anatomical specimens. The ‘doctor’ placed on a table a dozen or more jars containing, as he said, the matrices (uteri) of every class of women. Nearly a half of one of these cases was occupied exclusively with these specimens.

Not long after this the ‘doctor’ was in my room when my Lieutenant-Colonel came in and commenced expatiating on the charms of a certain woman. In a moment, almost, the doctor was lecturing him and denouncing women. When he was asked why he hated women, he said that when quite a young man he fell desperately in love with a pretty girl, rather his senior, who promised to reciprocate his affection. After a brief courtship he married her. The honeymoon was not over when he noticed a disposition on the part of his wife to flirt with other men. He remonstrated, she kissed him, called him a dear jealous fool -- and he believed her. Happening one day to pass in a cab through the worst part of the town he saw his wife and a man enter a gloomy-looking house. Then he learned that before her marriage his wife had been an inmate of that and many similar houses. Then he gave up all womankind."

If any of this account is to be taken at face value, it sets the mood for the ‘misogynist doctor’ so prevalent in Ripper theory and profiling.

Tumblety next moved to St. Louis, again setting up his ‘medical’ practice, and again promenading himself around the city with arrogant splendor. It was here that another aspect of Tumblety’s character emerges -- his paranoia. He was arrested in St. Louis for wearing military garb and medals he did not deserve, but Tumblety himself took it as persecution from his medical competitors. Soon after her traveled to Carondelet, Missouri and was again imprisoned for a time on the same charge.

It was upon his return to St. Louis, however, that Tumblety received his greatest blow. A poor choice in aliases resulted in his being arrested in connecting with the Lincoln assasination, as he was in the habit of using the name J.H. Blackburn. Dr. L.P. Blackburn was at that time under warrant for an alleged plot to infect the North with blankets carrying yellow-fever. Tumblety was eventually exonerated, but another rumor began that he had at one time employed one of the assasination conspirators. This rumor was dispelled as well. Tumblety subsequently wrote and published The Kidnapping of Dr. Tumblety, a short pamphlet he authored in an attempt to clear his name and re-establish his good-faith with the public. In reality, the book is little more than a series of paranoid ramblings and fraudulent testimonials.

After these fiascos Tumblety wisely chose to lave the U.S. for London in the late 1860s, soon after travelling to Berlin, then to Liverpool in 1874. It was there that he was to meet the not-yet famous Sir Henry Hall Caine (then 21), who was bisexual and almost certainly carried on a homosexual affair with the ‘doctor.’ The two carried on their romance until 1876, when Tumblety returned to New York City. While in New York, Tumblety aroused suspicion through his 'seeming mania for the company of young men and grown-up youths.'
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« Reply #71 on: April 06, 2015, 05:58:15 pm »

 In the years that followed, Tumblety continued to travel across both America and Europe, and raised controversy once again in 1880 when he brought a false suit against a Mrs. Lyons for the sum of $1000, which he claimed she stole from him. Then in October, 1885, his brother Patrick was killed in Rochester when a crumbled chimney landed on him.

Francis Tumblety returned to Liverpool in June of 1888, and once again found himself at odds with the police. He was arrested on November 7th, 1888 on charges of gross indecency and indecent assault with force and arms against four men between July 27th and November 2. These eight charges were euphemisms for homosexual activities. Tumblety was then charged on suspicion of the Whitechapel murders on the 12th (suggested he was free to kill Kelly between the 7th and 12th). Tumblety was bailed on November 16th. A hearing was held on November 20th at the Old Bailey, and the trial postponed until December 10th. Tumblety then fled to France under the alias ‘Frank Townsend’ on the 24th, and from there took the steamer La Bretagne to New York City.

New York officials new of his impending arrival in the city and had the ports watched for the suspect, but to no avail. Many American newspapers reported that Scotland Yard men had followed him across the Atlantic, and it is known the Inspector Andrews did follow a suspect to New York City around this time, though not named specifically as Tumblety.

New York City’s Chief Inspector Byrnes soon discovered Tumblety was lodging at 79 East Tenth Street at the home of Mrs McNamara, and he had him under surveillance for some days following. Byrnes could not arrest Tumblety because, in his own words, 'there is no proof of his complicity in the Whitechapel murders, and the crime for which he was under bond in London is not extraditable.'

The situation was tense: all of New York City knew of Tumblety’s whereabouts, thanks to the many newspaper articles covering Byrnes’s surveillance, but there was no legal means of detaining the man. Fear and suspicion rose until, on the 5th of December, Tumblety disappeared from his lodgings once again, eluding the New York police who were watching him so closely. Interest gradually waned as the years dragged on, and Tumblety next appears in Rochester in 1893, where he lived with his sister. He would die a decade later in 1903 in St. Louis, a man of considerable wealth. Tumblety was buried in Rochester, NY.

Such was the life of Francis Tumblety. Interestingly enough, there was absolutely no press coverage in the UK papers, while American papers (especially New York) carried dozens of full-length articles on his arrest and escape (see, for example, an article of December 3rd, 1888 from the Rochester Democrat and Republican). It has been suggested that Scotland Yard wished to keep Tumblety a secret from the press in order to avoid the embarassment of losing their top suspect.

Whatever the case, the story of Francis Tumblety and his connections to the Ripper crimes emerged only a few years ago in 1993, when Stewart Evans acquired what has now become known as the Littlechild letter. It was a letter penned by Chief Inspector John Littlechild in 1913 in response to some questions asked of him by journalist G.R. Sims. The authenticity of the letter has been established by numerous scientific and historical tests, and is not challenged by any researcher.

The letter mentions the name Tumblety as ‘a very likely suspect,’ and provided the first insight into a Scotland Yard suspect whose name was lost for 105 years. Evans continued to research the suspect with co-author Paul Gainey for two years before publishing the first edition of his work, The Lodger, which would be titled in subsequent editions Jack the Ripper: First American Serial Killer.

The news of this new suspect was indeed one of the most celebrated discoveries of the past decade, and many top-named researchers admit that Tumblety’s case is one of the most persuasive to have emerged in recent years.
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« Reply #72 on: April 06, 2015, 05:58:54 pm »

 Evans and Gainey outline fifteen reasons why they believe Tumblety should be considered a top suspect in the Whitechapel murders:

    Tumblety fits many requirements of what we now know as the ‘serial killer profile.’ He had a supposed hatred of women and prostitutes (the abortion with the prostitute Dumas, his alleged failed marriage to an ex-prostitute, his collection of uteri, etc.)
    Tumblety was in London at the time and may indeed have been the infamous ‘Batty Street Lodger’ -- he therefore may have had fair knowledge of the East End environs.
    Tumblety may have had some anatomical knowledge, as inferred by his collection of wombs, his ‘medical’ practice, and his short-term work with Dr. Lispenard in Rochester.
    He was arrested in the midst of the Autumn of Terror on suspicion of having committed the murders.
    There were no more murders after he fleed England on the 24th November, if one counts only the canonical five murders.
    Chief Inspector Littlechild, a top name in Scotland Yard, believed him a ‘very likely suspect,’ and he was not alone in his convictions.
    Tumblety was fond of using aliases, disappearing without a trace, and was the subject of police enquiries before his arrest.
    Scotland Yard and the American police had been in touch numerous times concerning Tumblety’s flight from France to New York.
    One of the three detectives inspectors assigned to the case was sent to New York at the same time, perhaps to pursue Tumblety.
    Tumblety evaded capture in New York City once again.
    Tumblety had the wealth necessary for frequent travel and could afford to change his clothes frequently should they have become bloodstained.
    He was an eccentric; but shrewd.
    He had a tendency toward violence at times, and his career may have included other offences both at home and abroad.
    Several acquaintances of his in America believed it likely that he was the Ripper when interviewed in 1888.
    There is a strong case to be made that he was indeed the Batty Street Lodger.

Still, there are many opponents who believe Tumblety’s status as ‘Scotland Yard’s top suspect’ is poorly deserved. They make note of the fact that Tumblety’s homosexuality would rule him out as a suspect, as homosexual serial killers are concerned singularly with male victims and would be uninterested in female prostitutes.


http://www.casebook.org/suspects/tumblety.html
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« Reply #73 on: April 06, 2015, 06:44:17 pm »

So far it still looks like James Kelly.

James Maybrick is the most popular suspect among "Ripperologists," but the "Diary of Jack the Ripper that emerged in the 1990s has been confessed to being a hoax by Michael Barrett, an unemployed former Liverpool scrap metal dealer, who probably needed the money at the time. Maybrick would not even be considered a suspect at all if it weren't for the diary, he was too ill from being poisoned from his wife at the time!

Francis Tumblety, second most popular suspect, well I agree that a gay man probably wouldn't be interested in prostitutes, his 'candidacy' probably derives, in part from gay-bashing.

Mystery writer Patricia Corwell taps Walter Sickert as the suspect from DNA evidence on the letters. But how reliable is DNA evidence over 100 years old? No one else has ever used it for a murder suspect, especially from letters!  Only the 'From Hell' letter has been conclusively linked to the murders anyway (and it was unsigned), that is the one that had the piece of the kidney.
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« Reply #74 on: April 06, 2015, 06:49:14 pm »

Which brings us to the 'Royal Conspiracy' theories. Prince Albert Victor was a popular suspect during the 70s and 80s, unfortunately, he was away from London at the time of the killings. How about William Gull, his royal physician..? Gull was tabbed as a suspect for the 1980s miniseries starring Michael Caine and the Johnny Depp movie (based on the Allen Moore comic book From Hell). No one mentions that Gull was over seventy years old at the time, recovering from a stroke.

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