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Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?

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Author Topic: Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?  (Read 973 times)
Keira Kensington
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« Reply #75 on: April 06, 2015, 07:01:07 pm »

Dr. Thomas Neill Cream claimed to be the ripper, but he was a poisoner, not a ripper, he was also in prison at the time.

James Kelly was 38 years old at the time and had recently escaped from a mental institution for the killing of his wife. He is the only suspect that can be tabbed in London at the time of all of the murders and also in America where similar killings happened later. He hated prostitutes, whom he believed gave him venerial diseases and women in general. Early on, he was a suspect of the police, but they dropped him when the trail went cold. His image fits that of the man depicted in the London newspaper cartoons.

I believe there were more Ripper murders than given credit for, that they started earlier and ended later in Whitechapel than the five usually presented (there are 11 victims around the time), and that they continued in New York, Texas in Georgia, with Carrie Brown being the first murder victim in America, in New York, died April 24, 1891

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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #76 on: April 06, 2015, 07:29:50 pm »



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« Reply #77 on: April 12, 2015, 12:32:32 am »

Who was Jack the Ripper and did he strike America?
November 18, 2009 10:12 AM MST

 

In 1891, two New York City prostitutes turned up dead and mutilated. Newspapers speculated whether Jack the Ripper arrived in the city. Like the London serial killer, the New York murderer was never captured. Last Sunday, the Discovery Channel aired Jack the Ripper in America and asked whether Jack the Ripper came to America. A veteran cold case investigator, Ed Norris, looked into the 1891 murders and it took him to London. By the time Norris finished, he concluded that Jack the Ripper came to America and went on a killing spree. When all the evidence is examined, and connections made, there is little doubt that Ed Norris identified Jack the Ripper and the infamous London killer plied his trade in America.

In 1883, James Kelly flew into a rage and accused his wife of being unfaithful. Kelly lost control and knifed her to death. Kelly was an upholsterer by trade and knew how to use a knife quickly to get his job done. After his capture, the wife murderer was sentenced to hang, but his employer came forward and told authorities that Kelly was unstable. After talking to Kelly’s boss, the authorities sent the wife killer to Broadmore Lunatic Asylum. While at the asylum, Kelly played violin and acted normally most of the time. However, he also tended to fly into fits of rage. In 1888, Kelly fashioned a metal key and escaped to London. The Ripper killings followed shortly thereafter.

From August to November, 1888, five prostitutes were killed and mutilated in the Whitechapel district of London. Prostitutes frequented the area and made easy targets. Jack the Ripper’s crimes show rage and a hatred of women. James Kelly was prone to uncontrollable rage and admitted hating “skanks.” So, Kelly had the mindset, the motivation, and the knowledge needed to kill quickly and tear apart a body.

London police searched for Kelly, but later gave up the search. If the murders occurred today, the police would search high and low for James Kelly. Unfortunately, in the late nineteenth century, the police were not up to the challenge. Kelly escaped to America. In 1890, he arrived in New York City and changed his name to John Miller. Shortly after Kelly arrived, a newspaper received a letter from someone claiming to be Jack the Ripper.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #78 on: April 12, 2015, 12:33:18 am »

The Ripper taunted the London police with at least one letter. Serial killers crave attention. After the New York letter, two prostitutes turned up mutilated. New Yorkers wondered whether Jack the Ripper had immigrated to their city. From 1891-1895, Kelly traveled America. Wherever he went, mutilation murders followed. In four years, twelve murders occurred in places Kelly traveled.

Kelly returned to Broadmore in 1927. The elderly man explained to the attendants how he had been “on the warpath” and how he disliked “skanks.” Kelly also gave an accounting of his whereabouts. Kelly’s testimony proved vital to Ed Norris’ investigation. Norris matched mutilation murders to the dates and places Kelly traveled. Additionally, authorities photographed Kelly in 1927 and Norris used age regression technology to get an idea of what Kelly looked like in 1888. The age regressed photo matched a police sketch made by eye witnesses. Kelly was a dead ringer for the Ripper sketch.

The Discover Channel’s Jack the Ripper in America provides a great example of cold case detective work. Cold Case investigator Ed Norris investigated a New York murder and leads took him to London’s Jack the Ripper. After whittling down a list of suspects, Norris focused on James Kelly. Kelly killed his wife, was mentally ill, and knew how to use a knife through his work as an upholsterer. He escaped the asylum in time for the Ripper murders, goes to America, and is present in cities that experienced Ripper-like murders. Additionally, he hated prostitutes and easily flew into an uncontrollable rage. Lastly, his mug shot matched Jack the Ripper witness sketches from the period. While it is true Norris lacked physical evidence to tie Kelly to the crimes, the circumstantial evidence is so overwhelming, that it can be said with confidence that James Kelly was Jack the Ripper.

http://www.examiner.com/article/who-was-jack-the-ripper-and-did-he-strike-america
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #79 on: April 12, 2015, 12:45:26 am »

Scotland Yard files that have been in the vaults for decades; not lost as many thought; have court documents concerning one James Kelly.  An Investigation Discovery documentry; Discovery Sunday: Jack the Ripper in America"; goes into exact detail about James Kelly, even comparing an "age regressed" sketch of Kelly taken from his asylum photo taken in 1927; with the composite of the Ripper suspect taken from eye witnesses reports.

The match is 99.95% accurate.

Kelly died at the Broadmoore Insane Asylum in 1929, after returning there in 1927; he had been on the loose for 40 years.  His confession was exact about a dozen "Ripper" style murders in the US.  Kelly went so far as to write to the NY Times newspaper BEFORE he killed his first US victim.  EVERY newspaper in the US cities where Kelly killed had banner headlines that echoed Kellys murders "Jack the Ripper in America". 

Kelly killed; actually butchered as Mary Kelly had been; twelve women in the US in four years.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=170399
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #80 on: April 12, 2015, 12:47:01 am »



From Wiki:

James Kelly

Posted Image This suspect was first identified in the well-researched Prisoner 1167: The madman who was Jack the Ripper, by Jim Tully, in 1997.[60]

A retired NYPD cold-case detective named Ed Norris examined the Jack the Ripper case for a Discovery Channel program called "Jack the Ripper in America." In it, Norris builds a compelling case that James Kelly was not only Jack the Ripper's real identity, he was also responsible for multiple murders in cities around the United States after his reign of terror in London.

James Kelly (no known relation to the Ripper victim Mary Kelly) (20 April 1860 – 17 September 1929) murdered his wife in 1883 by stabbing her in the neck. Deemed insane, he was committed to the Broadmoor Asylum, from which he later escaped in early 1888, using a key he fashioned himself. The timing of his escape would have allowed him to be in London just in time for The Ripper's murders. Kelly was an upholsterer by trade, and an upholsterer's knife would produce the types of wounds found on the majority of the victims. After the last Ripper murder in London in November 1888, the police searched for Kelly at what had been his residence prior his wife's murder, but they were not able to locate him. In 1927, almost forty years after his escape, he unexpectedly turned himself back in to officials at the Broadmoor Asylum. He died two years later, presumably of natural causes.

Before his death, Kelly gave an accounting of where he had been during the years since his escape. The typed declaration was unearthed by the Discovery Channel in research for the program "Jack the Ripper in America." In it, Kelly said he had "been on the warpath" since leaving the asylum. He claimed to have traveled to London, which would have put him in that city right at the time The Ripper began his murderous rampage. He said he later traveled to America aboard an Anglo-German steamer called the Zaandam that sailed from Rotterdam to New York. Research by the Discovery Channel at Britain's National Maritime Museum confirmed the ship not only existed, it sailed from Rotterdam to New York on October 7, 1890—two years after the last Ripper murder in London. That would have put Kelly in America during the time frame in which similar murders occurred on American soil, including the gruesome murder in New York of prostitute Carrie Brown, who was killed in April 1891. Crime scene photos revealed Brown's body had a large 'X' carved in it, which Norris speculated was actually a Roman numeral, as Brown would have been Kelly's tenth victim (counting his murdered wife). Kelly's statement placed him in more cities in the United States in which other murders occurred that bore a resemblance to the horrific killings in London. Local newspapers at the time even speculated that The Ripper may have come to America and been responsible for the brutal slayings. Norris compared photos of Kelly with the physical description of The Ripper given to police in London at the time of the murders and found Kelly was a close match.
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« Reply #81 on: April 12, 2015, 12:56:08 am »



Jack the Ripper - James Kelly - Documentary part 1
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #82 on: April 12, 2015, 12:58:42 am »

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« Reply #83 on: April 12, 2015, 01:13:12 am »



Lia AzharNovember 13, 2012 at 8:45 PM

He was The Ripper because research shows that their handwriting were same Smiley
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auni aulyaNovember 13, 2012 at 11:09 PM

i agree with Lia! because i already made research and asked Mr. Kama, James Kelly was JTR because their handwriting were same, and the letter from HELL meaning his dorm 7734.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #84 on: April 12, 2015, 01:14:37 am »




Jack the Ripper in America

http://ahmadasyraf4b.blogspot.com/2012/09/james-kelly-is-not-jack-ripper.html
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« Reply #85 on: April 12, 2015, 01:16:23 am »

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« Reply #86 on: April 15, 2015, 12:47:28 am »

Later Whitechapel murders

Kelly is generally considered to be the Ripper's final victim, and it is assumed that the crimes ended because of the culprit's death, imprisonment, institutionalisation, or emigration.[16] The Whitechapel murders file does, however, detail another four murders that happened after the canonical five: those of Rose Mylett, Alice McKenzie, the Pinchin Street torso and Frances Coles.

Mylett was found strangled in Clarke's Yard, High Street, Poplar on 20 December 1888. As there was no sign of a struggle, the police believed that she had accidentally hanged herself on her collar while in a drunken stupor, or committed suicide.[40] Nevertheless, the inquest jury returned a verdict of murder.[40]

McKenzie was killed on 17 July 1889 by severance of the left carotid artery. Several minor bruises and cuts were found on the body, discovered in Castle Alley, Whitechapel. One of the examining pathologists, Thomas Bond, believed this to be a Ripper murder, though another pathologist, George Bagster Phillips, who had examined the bodies of three previous victims, disagreed.[41] Later writers are also divided between those who think that her murderer copied the Ripper's modus operandi to deflect suspicion from himself,[42] and those that ascribe it to the Ripper.[43]

"The Pinchin Street torso" was a headless and legless torso of an unidentified woman found under a railway arch in Pinchin Street, Whitechapel, on 10 September 1889. It seems probable that the murder was committed elsewhere and that parts of the dismembered body were dispersed for disposal.[44]

Coles was killed on 13 February 1891 under a railway arch at Swallow Gardens, Whitechapel. Her throat was cut but the body was not mutilated. James Thomas Sadler, seen earlier with her, was arrested by the police, charged with her murder and was briefly thought to be the Ripper.[45] He was, however, discharged from court for lack of evidence on 3 March 1891.[45]
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« Reply #87 on: April 15, 2015, 12:48:20 am »

Other alleged victims

In addition to the eleven Whitechapel murders, commentators have linked other attacks to the Ripper. In one case, that of "Fairy Fay", it is unclear whether the attack was real or fabricated as a part of Ripper lore.[46] "Fairy Fay" was a nickname given to a victim allegedly found on 26 December 1887 "after a stake had been thrust through her abdomen",[47][48] but there were no recorded murders in Whitechapel at or around Christmas 1887.[49] "Fairy Fay" seems to have been created through a confused press report of the murder of Emma Elizabeth Smith, who had had a stick or other blunt object shoved into her abdomen.[50] Most authors agree that "Fairy Fay" never existed.[46][51]

Annie Millwood was admitted to Whitechapel workhouse infirmary with stab wounds in the legs and lower torso on 25 February 1888.[52] She was discharged but died from apparently natural causes aged 38 on 31 March 1888.[51] She was later postulated as the Ripper's first victim, but the attack cannot be linked definitely.[53] Another supposed early victim was Ada Wilson,[54] who reportedly survived being stabbed twice in the neck on 28 March 1888.[55] Annie Farmer, who resided at the same lodging house as Martha Tabram,[56] reported an attack on 21 November 1888. She had a superficial cut on her throat, but it was possibly self-inflicted.[57
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« Reply #88 on: April 15, 2015, 12:49:44 am »

"The Whitehall Mystery" was a term coined for the discovery of a headless torso of a woman on 2 October 1888 in the basement of the new Metropolitan Police headquarters being built in Whitehall. An arm belonging to the body was previously discovered floating in the river Thames near Pimlico, and one of the legs was subsequently discovered buried near where the torso was found.[58] The other limbs and head were never recovered and the body was never identified. The mutilations were similar to those in the Pinchin Street case, where the legs and head were severed but not the arms. The Whitehall Mystery and the Pinchin Street case may have been part of a series of murders, called the "Thames Mysteries", committed by a single serial killer, dubbed the "Torso killer".[59] Whether Jack the Ripper and the "Torso killer" were the same person or separate serial killers active in the same area is debatable.[59] As the modus operandi of the Torso killer differed from that of the Ripper, police at the time discounted any connection between the two.[60] Elizabeth Jackson, a prostitute whose various body parts were collected from the river Thames over a three-week period in June 1889, may have been another victim of the "Torso killer".[61]

John Gill, a seven-year-old boy, was found murdered in Manningham, Bradford, on 29 December 1888. His legs had been severed, his abdomen opened, his intestines drawn out, and his heart and one ear removed. The similarities with the murder of Mary Kelly led to press speculation that the Ripper had killed the boy.[62] The boy's employer, milkman William Barrett, was twice arrested for the murder on circumstantial evidence but was released.[62] No-one else was ever prosecuted.[62]

Carrie Brown (nicknamed "Shakespeare", reportedly for quoting Shakespeare's sonnets) was strangled with clothing and then mutilated with a knife on 24 April 1891 in New York City.[63] Her body was found with a large tear through her groin area and superficial cuts on her legs and back. No organs were removed from the scene, though an ovary, either purposely removed or unintentionally dislodged, was found upon the bed.[63] At the time, the murder was compared to those in Whitechapel, though the Metropolitan Police eventually ruled out any connection.[63]
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« Reply #89 on: April 15, 2015, 12:51:02 am »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_the_Ripper

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrie_Brown_%28murder_victim%29

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitechapel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitechapel_murders
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