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Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?

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Author Topic: Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?  (Read 1136 times)
Keira Kensington
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« Reply #45 on: April 05, 2015, 05:48:33 pm »

http://www.casebook.org/victims/carrie.html

This tied in with the fact that James Kelly, a ripper suspect, was in the same city at the same time.. I think it's quite plausible indeed that he was responsible and at the very least should be considered. Like he himself seemingly said years later.. he was on a "warpath."

The New York newspaper is seemingly the key to all of this. The killing had all the trademarks of a ripper slaying, yes, and Kelly even traveled to America and was in the same city just in time for the killings but It's still not enough really. The fact he's said to have wrote to a local newspaper warning them about his presence, and then the victim is found, which if true, gives this story and this theory by far more credibility.

Unfortunately information about it is frustratingly hard to come by. But!, I did come across an interesting documentary called 'Jack the Ripper - In America' which discusses the possibility of the Ripper making his way over to the U.S., presumably in order to escape the media coverage of the killings here in the UK, coverage which was absolutely huge at the time, and moving to America to continue the crusade against Prostitutes certainly would've made his "job" by far easier to do.

This documentary also seriously considers that James Kelly, the man I'm highlighting in this thread, was the original Jack the Ripper, and they also go into some detail on this New York newspaper, their story about the ripper prior to the murder as well as much more on Kelly.

Here it is and It's certainly worth a watch:

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread782875/pg1#pid12947418
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #46 on: April 05, 2015, 05:49:31 pm »

From the above documentary It's claimed that in James's end of life confession he also claimed to visit states such as Baltimore, Texas, LA, New Jersey and many more locations. In the above documentary It's also claimed Ripper-type murders can also be found and tied to Kelly in these states he visited at the time he is said to be there.
edit on 5-12-2011 by Rising Against because: (no reason given)
edit on Mon Dec 5 2011 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)


Rising Against

posted on Dec, 5 2011 @ 08:10 AM
link   

- James Kelly in a Final, Brief Summary -

_________________________________________________________


At one point in time I believe the FBI even went to the trouble of creating something of a murder profile for Jack the Ripper, It's as follows:


    White male, aged 28 to 36, living or working in the Whitechapel area.

    In childhood, there was an absent or passive father figure.

    The killer probably had a profession in which he could legally experience his destructive tendencies.

    Jack the Ripper probably ceased his killing because he was either arrested for some other crime, or felt himself close to being discovered as the killer.

    The killer probably had some sort of physical defect which was the source of a great deal of frustration or anger.



Here is another FBi report found on the official FBI website looking at everything relating to the Ripper, from what he may have looked like to what his motives would be.


Anyway, when looking at the above killer profile, looking at just this alone, it seems James Kelly can fit almost perfectly. At the time of the killings for example he was around 28 years of age as the profile suggests - the profile made from witness statements etc. We also know for certain that he was living around Whitechapel at some point, even buying the time of local prostitutes for example.

We also know he was an upholsterer and would've had easy access to very sharp knives, and ones he undoubtedly would've used and "honed his skills" with every single day. In regards to him being caught however, I don't believe It's very likely. But as was mentioned previously in this thread from looking at his end of life confession he does explain to us that he boarded a ship to America and went onto live under the name John Miller while there.. He also went into hiding in the immediate aftermath of his Broadmoor escape so we know he's capable of simply disappearing like this. Someone escaping a crime by moving to America and then changing their name was also something that certainly wasn't uncommon at the time.

Could this theory really be correct though, could Kelly really be the infamous Jack the Ripper as we know today? Well, It's possible in my opinion, possible at the very least. We know for a fact that this man was capable of murder, even murder of those he loved and who was closest to him all the while in a stage of intense rage at very minor things. We know for a fact he was mentally unstable, this instability leading him to murder in the first place, we know he was certainly not a dumb man, his escape from prison showing signs of him being someone who plans smart and extensively. He also evaded capture right up until he chose for authorities to get hands on him by giving himself up in 1927.

James also seemed to have quite a keen sense of hatred for women, and particularly prostitutes. This perhaps due to his experiences with his first wife Sarah and the fact that he was given a venereal disease by prostitutes, something which went onto ruin his short marriage and lead to him committing murder and eventually jail, effectively ruining his life thus a motive.

As I come to this thread however I can't help but stress that there is many other suspects for Jack the Ripper, well over 200 of them in fact, albeit it much fewer plausible suspects. In this thread however I chose, on purpose, to focus solely on just one of them,.. James Kelly. I did so as I felt he was a very plausible Ripper candidate, someone who fits the profile perfectly, can be placed in the, or near the locations of the murders, at the time they took place, not forgetting a plausible motive.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #47 on: April 05, 2015, 05:55:06 pm »

http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread782875/pg1#pid12947418
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #48 on: April 05, 2015, 05:59:09 pm »

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« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2015, 04:18:29 pm »

    
James Kelly
Our thanks to Alan Sharp for compiling this timeline

April 20th 1860 - James Kelly born in Preston, Lancashire, the illegitimate son of 15 year old Sarah Kelly. After the birth Sarah returns to Liverpool leaving James in the care of her mother Teresa. James never meets his mother.

1870 - Sarah Kelly marries Master Mariner John Allen.

1873 - James Kelly leaves school and begins an apprenticeship as an upholsterer.

May 16th 1874 - John Allen dies in Peru leaving Sarah Kelly a house and a share in a cargo ship. Sarah falls to pieces and her health begins to deteriorate.

July 29th 1874 - Sarah Kelly dies. In her will she leaves James a small fortune of over 25,000 to be held in trust for him until his 25th birthday.

1875 - Teresa Kelly tells James about his history and his inheritance. It is the first time he learns that the woman he thought was his mother is really his grandmother. He is withdrawn from his apprenticeship and sent to Dr Robert Hurworth's Commercial Academy in New Brighton to learn bookkeeping and clerical skills.

1876 - Teresa Kelly dies.

1877 - James finishes his education and takes a job in Liverpool with Isaac H. Jones, a pawnbroker. He begins to act irrationally and experience mood swings.

Late 1878 - James decides to quit his job and return to his previous trade as an upholsterer. He also decides to move to London, and applies to the administrators of his trust fund who agree to fund the move. On arrival in London he applies to the East London Upholsterer's Trade Society in Shoreditch for work. They agree to help him find a position, but suggest he takes casual work in the meantime.

Early 1879 - Kelly takes lodgings at 37 Collingwood Street, Bethnal Green with the family of fellow upholsterer Walter Lamb. In the company of Lamb and another friend John Merritt, a 35 year old married cab driver, the formerly devout Catholic Kelly learns the delights of hard drinking and paid sex on the back streets of the East End. He works at a variety of casual jobs in sweatshops all over the district. Eventually he decides to try his luck elsewhere.

1879-1881 - For two years there are only scant details of Kelly's movements. For at least some time he is living in Brighton, and he spends a period serving aboard an American Man-o-war.

Mid 1881 - He returns to London and renews his acquaintance with Lamb and Merritt. He works at a variety of casual jobs and sometimes serves on Continental cargo ships. His drinking becomes heavier than ever and most evenings are spent around Whitechapel and Spitalfields.

December 1881 - A few weeks before Christmas he meets Sarah Brider and quickly becomes enamoured of her. Sarah takes him home to meet her family and the pair become an item. Sarah's parents think him a serious and religious young man with good prospects.

March 1882 - Kelly moves into the Brider's house at 21 Cottage Lane, just off the City Road between Shoreditch and Islington, as a lodger. He has to share a room with another man. He cuts down n his drinking and other activities and spends many evenings in the house with Sarah and her parents.

Christmas 1882 - Kelly and Sarah have become increasingly intimate over the year and, after much persistence on his part, she surrenders her virginity to him. The event is a disaster. Despite being sexually experienced, Kelly has only slept with low-class prostitutes, and neither one has had any kind of sex education. He is not prepared for how different sex with a virgin will be and finds himself unable to penetrate. He is convinced that Sarah has some kind of deformity and she babbles a story of being interfered with by an uncle by way of explanation. Kelly's former erratic behaviour returns after this and he experiences stronger and stronger depressions and mood swings in the following months. He also returns to his former habits in the East End rather than pressing Sarah further.

February 1883 - Fearful that he will lose Sarah who is growing more distant, he proposes marriage to her. She delays but eventually accepts. However in the meantime Kelly finds he has a venereal disease and, fearful of doctors, resolves to treat it himself.

April 1st 1883 - Kelly finally lands a permanent job in the upholstery trade, working for John Hiron of 4 Orchard Buildings, Acton Street, Haggerston. Sarah's family pressure him to set a date for the wedding, although he is reluctant due to his disease. They finally agree a date of June 4th. Kelly's erratic behaviour continues and he begins experiencing serious headaches and discharges from his ears.

Friday June 1st 1883 - Kelly is dismissed from his job. As a reason Hiron states that "he was obviously not right in the head." Kelly has some money from his trust fund and it is decided that the wedding will go ahead.

Monday June 4th 1883 - Kelly and Sarah are married at St Luke's Parish Church, Old Street, EC1. On the same day he obtains a new upholstery job with Cornelius Vincent Smith at Marshall's Yard, 4 Henry Street, close to Regents Park and 2 miles walk from Cottage Lane. The couple remain at Sarah's parents house and because of shortness of space Kelly continues to share a room with the lodger. It is believed that the marriage is never consummated.

Saturday June 9th 1883 - Kelly demands Sarah see a doctor about her 'deformity'. Sarah turns to her parents and her father, John Brider, confronts Kelly who pours out to him the whole tale of their sexual problems and the supposed abuse by an uncle. Stunned by this, Mr Brider agrees that Sarah should see a doctor, but Kelly broods on the incident the whole weekend.

Monday June 11th 1883 - Kelly travels to Liverpool and asks the fund trustees for money so that he and Sarah can set up house together. He is successful and returns the same day.

Sunday June 17th 1883 - When cleaning the room Kelly shares, Mrs Brider finds a syringe and the drugs Kelly is using to treat himself. She and Sarah tackle him and after initially denying that they are his, he flies into a rage and accuses Sarah of being a prostitute and infecting him, and accuses them both of tricking him into marriage to get their hands on his inheritance.

Monday June 18th 1883 - Sarah's birthday. Filled with remorse at his outburst of the night before Kelly resolves to take her out on their return from work. Kelly waits for her but she does not return until 9 o'clock, over an hour later than usual. Ignoring Kelly she goes into the parlour and tells her mother she is unwell. Kelly runs into the parlour and drags Sarah into the kitchen screaming abuse at her. Then he pulls a carving knife from a kitchen drawer and threatens to stab her unless she tells him where she has been. She claims to have gone to get some quinine to help him with his problems. Kelly calms down instantly and collapses in a chair crying.

Thursday June 21st 1883 - Sarah returns home from work at around 8pm and says she is going back out to meet Kelly. An hour later he appears without her. Mrs Brider asks where she is and he tells her that he saw her on the other side of the road and did not cross to her. Then he snaps at her that no woman will ever master him and he goes out again.

Twenty minutes later they return together and on entering Sarah pulls away from him and locks herself in her room. Kelly flies into a rage and breaks the door down. When Mrs Brider arrives Kelly is yelling at Sarah that she is a ****. Sarah replies that she no longer wants to live with him or ever see him again. Once again Kelly calms down instantly and begs forgiveness, but Sarah will not relent this time. Kelly flies into a rage once more and this time he throws her to the floor, pulls a pen-knife from his pocket and plunges it into her neck. He then begins digging away with the knife as if trying to burrow deeper and deeper. Mrs Brider tries to drag him off by the hair, and he turns on her, picks her up and throws her across the room. Then he runs off and shuts himself in his bedroom.

Mrs Brider runs into the street screaming for help. Within minutes the police and a doctor arrive. Sarah is taken to St Bartholomew's Hospital and Kelly is arrested and taken to Old Street Police Station.

Friday June 22nd 1883 - Kelly is charged with attempted murder at Clerkenwell Police Court. He is remanded in custody for a week.

Saturday June 23rd 1883 - Kelly is taken to the hospital by Inspector Maynard where Sarah's statement is taken in his presence.

Sunday June 24th 1883 - Kelly writes a letter to Sarah begging her forgiveness. At 10.30 that evening Sarah dies from her injuries.

Monday June 25th 1883 - Kelly is charged with murder.

Thursday June 28th 1883 - First hearing at Clerkenwell Police Court. Kelly is formally charged and pleads insanity. He is remanded again for a week to allow the inquest on Sarah to take place. The inquest returns a verdict of wilful murder against him and a trial date is set.

Wednesday August 1st 1883 - The trial is held at the Old Bailey. Kelly pleads not guilty by reason of insanity. Sarah's statement is read to the court. A coachman named Frederick Hammond testifies to seeing Kelly threaten Sarah in the street shortly after 9 that evening. Dr Oliver Treadwell of Clerkenwell Prison testifies to having examined Kelly and found him to be sane. The jury return a guilty verdict and Kelly is sentenced to be hanged.

Thursday August 2nd 1883 - Kelly's lawyers lodge a petition of clemency. Among the signatories are Mr and Mrs Brider.

Friday August 3rd 1883 - The Home Secretary refuses clemency and the execution is set for August 20th. Kelly refuses to believe that he will be hanged, saying that God still has a mission in mind for him.

Tuesday August 7th 1883 - Kelly is examined by Dr W. Orange, superintendent of Broadmoor, who reports that in his opinion Kelly is of defective mental capacity.

Friday August 17th 1883 - Kelly is certified insane and his sentence is commuted. He is sentenced to be held in a maximum security mental institution during Her Majesties pleasure.

Friday August 24th 1883 - Kelly arrives at Broadmoor to begin his sentence.

1884 - Kelly obtains a violin and begins playing in the asylum band. He is put to work in the asylum garden.

1886 - Kelly befriends fellow inmate George Shatton. The two begin to plan an escape. They fashion keys from metal found in the asylum garden, by observing the keys hanging from the warder's belts.

January 23rd 1888 - At 6.30pm Kelly takes his violin and he and Shatton head off apparently to band practice. In reality Kelly uses the keys to let himself into the asylum garden. Shatton locks up after him and keeps the keys to make his own escape at a later date. Kelly then climbs the six foot wall of the garden to freedom. His escape is not noticed until the inmates are called for bed at 7.30. An anonymous note in Kelly's Broadmoor file indicates that John Merritt was seen in the neighbourhood of Broadmoor on the day of the escape. He may have been delivering 5 which Kelly had arranged to be given him from the trust fund, with which to bribe a warder.

Note: Aside from where official agencies are involved, Kelly's movements from this point are based on his own confession of 1927 and are uncorroborated.

Kelly heads for London by a roundabout route to escape detection. The journey takes 4 days and ends at a lodging-house in the docks where he lies up for a week or more.

February 1888 - James Monro, head of the Metropolitan Police CID, takes a particular interest in the case.

February - June 1888 - Having obtained money from friends Kelly heads to Liverpool. He walks the whole way to avoid being spotted on public transport. He is harboured by relatives for a while. After obtaining more money from friends he resolves to escape to the Continent. He sets off walking again to Harwich, where he arranges to work his passage on a ship. He is spotted on the deck by a sharp-eyed policeman and narrowly escapes. He heads back to London, arriving sometime before the end of June.

July - December 1888 - Kelly provides no details as to his movements until late that year, in November or December, he walks to Dover and obtains passage on a cross-channel steamer to Dieppe. He remains in France for three years, at first hugging the northern coast and later heading to Paris.

10th November 1888 - The day after the Mary Kelly murder, detectives raid 21Cottage Lane and question Mrs Brider as to Kelly's whereabouts.

12th November 1888 - Someone with the initials CET enters a note in Kelly's Metropolitan Police file suggesting that the detectives investigating the Whitechapel Murders should look into what steps have been taken to recapture Kelly.

January 1892 - He returns to England and obtains 3 10s from friends with which he buys passage on a German steamer, the Zaandam, to New York via Rotterdam.

January 27th 1896 - Kelly walks into the British Consulate in New Orleans and gives himself up.

March 18th 1896 - Kelly sets off back to England aboard the SS Capella. The Foreign Office arrange for him to be met by the authorities when the ship docks in Liverpool.

March 26th 1896 - The Capella arrives in Liverpool a day early. The authorities have not thought to check. Kelly waits around for some time to be arrested, then finally gets tired of waiting and heads off into Liverpool. When the escort party arrive the next day there is no sign of him. Kelly remains in England for a further two or three years working as a coach trimmer in Guildford, then takes a steamer, the SS Beechdale, to Vancouver.

1901 Kelly again resolves to give himself up. He tells his story to the British Consul in Vancouver but when the information is communicated back to London nobody appears interested. After waiting 3 months Kelly heads back to England under his own steam but on arrival changes his mind and does not give himself up. It is not known how long he stays this time. He works for some time as a coach trimmer in Godalming, and is spotted at one point working as an upholsterer in North London. At some point he returns to America, and crosses the Atlantic several more times in the years up until 1927.

April 22nd 1907 - Broadmoor officially discharge Kelly on account of the failure of the authorities to recapture him.

February 11th 1927 - Kelly arrives at the main gate of Broadmoor and asks to be let in. He is profoundly deaf and in poor physical condition. He is readmitted and remains there the rest of his life.

September 17th 1929 - Kelly dies.

Reasons for suspecting Kelly: He was a diagnosed Paranoid Schizophrenic. He had shown himself capable of murder with a knife. His reasons for murdering his wife were his belief that she was a prostitute and had infected him with VD. Having been disavowed of this idea in Broadmoor he would almost certainly have realised that the real source of his infection was the prostitutes of Whitechapel and Spitalfields with whom he had consorted. He may well have resolved to take his revenge on them for destroying his life. The raid on 21 Cottage Lane on 10th November 1888 shows that at least someone in the Metropolitan Police must have suspected him.

Reasons against suspecting Kelly: His movements after his escape from Broadmoor cannot be verified. There is no proof he was in London in late 1888. There are also no other murders which can be tied in with his movements between then and 1927.


http://www.casebook.org/suspects/jameskelly.html
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #50 on: April 06, 2015, 04:20:08 pm »

Final Paper: James the Ripper

James the Ripper


Above all other suspects considered in the Ripper murders, James Kelly stands out as the most likely killer. Due to his mental instability and capacity to murder another human being, Kelly appears to possess the qualities of a killer. Kelly proved he had the ability to get away with wrongdoings when he escaped from the Broadmoor Asylum in 1886. He is connected with the Ripper murders by his quest for revenge on Sara Brider through her sister Mary Brider (aka Mary Kelly). James Kelly is the most plausible suspect due to his insanity and hatred for women.

Through a series of traumatic events, James Kelly began his hatred for women at a young age. He was 15 when he found out that the woman he thought was his mother was actually his grandmother. Teresa, Kelly’s grandmother, was left to raise him once his mother left to find her own way and eventually became a prostitute. This revelation of the truth caused Kelly to become angry and confused thus starting him on his road to insanity. Shortly after Kelly found out the truth about his mother, she died of a liver disease. She left him money in a will that was used in order for Kelly to attend Dr. Robert Hurworth’s Commerical Academy. Not long after Kelly got acclimated to his school, the trustees of his mom’s will moved to work with a pawn broker. The constant uprooting of Kelly’s life possibly caused him to feel like he did not belong anywhere. Soon after becoming a pawn broker, his grandmother died causing Kelly to be left alone. His work began to be unreliable, and any small incident would send him into fits of rage. His mental instability was becoming very apparent through his incapacity to handle life rationally (Tully 2-6). This sequence of distressing events caused Kelly to not only worsen in his mental state but to move completely away from Liverpool.

https://jtrslondon.wordpress.com/2009/04/26/final-paper-james-the-ripper/
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2015, 04:21:24 pm »

Moving away from Liverpool did not help Kelly’s mental state, and in fact, may have made it worse. He searched all over the East end of London looking for work, and kept to himself. Then Kelly met a man named John Merritt who introduced Kelly to drinking and prostitutes. It was during this time that Kelly lost his virginity to a prostitute. Because he was forbidden by his faith to have sex before marriage, Kelly’s attitude toward the prostitutes was contemptuous. He could have sex with the prostitutes to relieve his sexual frustration and then have nothing to do with the women he had such hatred for throughout his life. The satisfaction that Kelly was looking for could not be found in prostitutes and he realized that he was on a path of self-destruction. It was at this time he left London and returned two years later in 1881, resuming his self destructive ways (Tully 10-14). It seemed that no matter where Kelly went his mental instability followed him and further debilitated his rational stance on life.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #52 on: April 06, 2015, 04:21:56 pm »

While in London, fate stepped in for Kelly and brought Sarah Brider into his life in 1881, which one would think could stabilize Kelly’s emotions. The two seemed fairly happy and by the beginning of 1882, the two were living with Sarah and her family at 21 Cottage Lane (Eddleston 217). Kelly began to cut down his drinking and began to spend more time with Sarah and her family (Casebook). It seemed that Sarah had made Kelly a better man but it was only a matter of time until Kelly’s need for sexual fulfillment brought back old demons. On June 4 1883, the two got married and problems began to arise in their marriage (Eddleston 217). Sarah could not fulfill Kelly’s sexual needs and he claimed she had a malformation (Tully 20). It is not certain whether Kelly caught a venereal disease before or after his marriage with Sarah but his disease was the cause of a big fight that broke out between the two (Casebook). After Sarah’s mom found syringes and ointment that Kelly was using to treat his venereal disease, she asked Sarah if she knew of Kelly’s disease. It was at this time that Kelly flew into a rage and accused Sarah of giving him the venereal disease (Tully 29). On June 18, 1883 Kelly tried to make up for his behavior by taking Sarah out once she returned from work. When she did not show until 9:00, over an hour late, Kelly got very angry. He dragged her into the parlor and threatened to stab her with a carving knife unless she disclosed where she has been all night. When she told Kelly that she was out getting medicine for his disease he let her go and began to sob (Casebook). Not only does this instance show Kelly’s negative view on women but his immediate violent reaction proves that he is more than capable of murder. On Thursday June 21, 1883, Sarah returned home from work at her usual time and she and Kelly began to argue for an unknown reason. Kelly threatened Sarah and called her a **** then he dragged her head down to the floor and stabbed her with a pocket knife in the throat and continued to dig at her with the knife causing further damage. When Sarah’s mother tried to help, Kelly threw her over the bed and knocked her unconscious and then ran into his room (Tully 33). This demonstrates that Kelly was certainly capable of committing a crime with viciousness and insanity. It seemed that Kelly’s hate for women had been taken out on his undeserving wife, proving that nothing could stabilize his erratic behavior.

Kelly’s behavior exhibited such insanity that it is not hard to believe him as the Ripper himself. On the morning of June 22, 1883, Kelly was charged with attempted murder. The charge was later changed to murder when Sarah died at half past ten on June 24. Kelly did not believe he would be sentenced to death because he believed that God had a mission for him (Casebook). This mission could possibly be to rid London of the women he thought so little of throughout his whole life. He was set to be executed on August 20, 1883 but on the 17th he was reprieved and was sent to Broadmoor Asylum (Eddleston 217). He started out on Block four of the asylum with the suicidal and quite mad. Kelly did not respond to treatment and felt that he had done nothing wrong, further showing his insanity and lack of remorse for his actions. He kept to himself and was considered a quiet young man with signs of religious mania (Tully 52). His lack of contact with woman was the likely reason for his somewhat good behavior in the asylum because women were the spark that ignited his insanity. Without being surrounded by women, Kelly was able to maintain a calm exterior and move his way forward in the institution with good behavior. He was given a violin and a private room and he joined the asylum band. With Kelly’s good behavior he was rewarded more freedom within the walls of the asylum. A normal man would use this for good, but the insane Kelly would find a way to use this to his benefit in the worst of ways. A quite insane man was about to be on the run.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #53 on: April 06, 2015, 04:22:39 pm »

Not only was Kelly mentally unstable but he also possessed quite mischievous qualities. Around 1887, Kelly meets George Stratton in the asylum and the two devise a plan for escape. Kelly and Stratton designed keys from metal they found in the garden by observing the keys that hung from the warder’s belt (Casebook). The keys were hidden in Kelly’s violin case to make a calculated escape. The two men waited until darkness fell and then Kelly put on his suit giving the appearance that he was going to attend band practice, and made his escape between 6:30-7:30pm on January 23, 1888. He climbed over a six foot tall wall and made his way over a perimeter wall and then was on the run (Tully 61-62). Although this was very calculated, unlike the Ripper murders, this proved that Kelly had endurance needed when he was determined to get his way. At 7:30pm, the guards noticed Kelly was missing but they did not begin a search. Sometime later, Scotland Yard was notified to start a search for James Kelly but he had more than a half hour start on his pursuers. By the time that authorities were notified, Kelly was long gone. The police never really made a serious effort to catch Kelly until February 3 of that year. They published a notice in the Police Gazette that contained so many inaccuracies that it showed the haste in which it had been written (Tully 72). The authorities played down the escape by saying that Kelly had been acting rational, previous to the escape, which proved that Kelly could act normal enough to deceive the public as a means of fitting in without being noticed after his escape. Kelly’s mischievous ways helped to escape from prison only to hit the streets with a vengeance.

In order to understand the reason James Kelly could be thought of as the Ripper, it is necessary to first understand the motive that he might have had. It is my belief that James Kelly killed Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, and Catherine Eddowes all in search of Mary Brider (aka Mary Kelly). This was the reason that after Mary Kelly was killed, the murders stopped. Sarah Brider (Kelly’s wife) may have had a sister, Mary Brider, who lived in the East end, making her way as a prostitute. It was believed that Mary Brider took her sister’s surname to work the streets. Therefore Mary Brider would have been Mary Kelly (Tully 325). If this is true, then it is very plausible that James Kelly went in search of Mary Brider to get revenge on her for the imagined grievances of Sarah and her mother. It is possible that James Kelly searched the East end for Mary and when he found out she was a prostitute, those women became a focus of search for Mary. It is very likely that each of the women could have reminded him in some way of the hatred he had for women with loose morals. If James Kelly were on a mission, much like escaping from the asylum, then he would have been unstoppable and would have crushed anyone in his path. He had so many imagined wrongs that had been done to him that it only added to the rage he had inside of him, thus explaining the ferociousness in which he attacked his victims. The prostitutes he killed may have just been causalities in Kelly’s quest for vengeance. Mary Ann Nichols would have been the first woman he approached in his search for Mary Brider. She had more bruising, which could have been because of Kelly’s inexperience and initial frustration in his search for his final victim. Annie Chapman would have been the next woman he approached, and she was left with severe mutilation and her intestines showing which literally could have meant that these women made him sick to his stomach; this was his way of proving it. Elizabeth Stride’s murder was less severe, with only her throat slit, but it must be kept in mind that these women were most likely just in his path and not direct targets, so Kelly probably did not go into the murders with any intentions. Catherine Eddowes was also mutilated, which shows that Kelly may have been getting more frustrated with his unsuccessful attempts to find Mary Brider. The last victim, Mary Kelly (aka Mary Brider), had the worst mutilations because this would have been Kelly’s ultimate goal; to make Mary pay for what her family had done to him. This would account for why the other murders were located in the streets; they were less personal, while Mary’s was in her bedroom, because it was very personal. This would also account for the reason the murders stopped; Kelly had reached his final objective and had finished out what he thought was his destiny.
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« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2015, 04:23:12 pm »

Although his motive makes perfect sense, it is still essential to look at the profile of the Ripper and see what connects James Kelly to being the killer. Some of the main reasons that Kelly fits the profile of the killer are because he hated women, particularly prostitutes. He also fits the profile of a serial lust killer, he had excellent knowledge of the geography of the East end, and he had sharp knives and ripping chisels as the tools for his trade. He also fit the age, being 27 or 28 (Tully 339). He fits the profile of the killer because he was a white man, between the ages of 25-35, he had a disturbed childhood with a mother who had questionable morals, he felt inferior due to an unstable childhood and stunted emotional growth, he had low self-esteem, he had a strong sexual urge, he appeared quite ordinary and inoffensive, he had been in a marriage that did not work out, he had been sexually frustrated, and lived or worked in the area of which the first murder was committed (Tully 311-312). He was a loner, and did not get along with women well except for his wife, but even that didn’t last long showing that Kelly could not keep a stable and rational relationship with a woman. It seems that Kelly was being an egotistical male to overcompensate for his lack of control in his life in general. It could be assumed, do to his lack of female relationships, that most women found Kelly’s strange social behavior unattractive; this is the reason for his unleashing of anger upon them in the Ripper murders. It could also be that with each prostitute he had relations with, his self esteem was lowered knowing that the prostitutes were the only form of female attention that he was receiving. His intense self-loathing would also account for the way he took out his anger on the prostitutes. Perhaps if he had love and affection as a youth, things would have turned out differently for him. The strict religious beliefs of his grandmother and the subsequent discovery of his grandmother’s lies, concerning his biological mother, resulted in his lack of faith in the female race. The shuttling of young James from family to family and place to place further contributed to his self-loathing. One has to wonder if some of the blame for his despicable actions lies with both his mother and grandmother. These two women were central figures in the formation of James’ beliefs and personality at a young age. His lack of a male figure to look up to may have also contributed to the psychological problems that James had in his adult life. His lack of ability to form lasting and healthy relationships was greatly impaired by the mistakes the adults in his life made. The only way he knew how to resolve the issues he had with women was to be violent, thus resulting in the deaths of Sarah Brider, Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes, and Mary Brider (Kelly). The profile of James Kelly seems to hold many qualities that the Ripper must have had in order to act out these atrocious crimes.
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« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2015, 04:23:40 pm »

James Kelly stands out as the most likely suspect to be the Ripper because of his apparent insanity and obvious capacity to kill another human being with no lasting remorse. Kelly appears to possess most of the qualities the Ripper would possess, including the availability of the murder weapon itself. His escape from the asylum showed that he did not believe he did anything wrong to his wife and he was on a true mission to get revenge of those he believed deserved the wrath of his anger. His main tie to the murders is in his pursuit of revenge on Mary Brider, who he believed should share the supposed pain that was inflicted upon him by Sarah and her mother. James Kelly is the most plausible Ripper suspect due to his apparent mental instability and severe dislike for women.
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« Reply #56 on: April 06, 2015, 04:25:25 pm »

Works Cited

Eddleston, John J. Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO, 2001.

“James Kelly.” Casebook: Jack The Ripper. 1996-2009. 15 Apr. 2009

<http://www.casebook.org/suspects/jameskelly.html&gt;.

Tully, James. Prisoner 1167 The Madman Who was Jack the Ripper. New York: Carroll & Graf,

1997.

https://jtrslondon.wordpress.com/2009/04/26/final-paper-james-the-ripper/
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« Reply #57 on: April 06, 2015, 04:26:36 pm »

3 Responses to “Final Paper: James the Ripper”

    The Identity of Jack the Ripper Revealed? | Second Starters Says:
    June 24, 2012 at 4:09 pm

    […] https://jtrslondon.wordpress.com/2009/04/26/final-paper-james-the-ripper/ […]
    Reply   
    audobon Says:
    March 15, 2013 at 12:37 am

    I have a question…don’t know if this has ever been posed before, but it seems rather rudimentary. I don’t recall it ever having been answered. If James Kelly is the most likely suspect, why hasn’t the handwriting from his original journals ever been compared to the “From Hell” letter? Why are we only shown transcripts?
    Reply   
    audobon Says:
    March 15, 2013 at 12:42 am

    Also, an actual photo of Kelly in his youth is in the public domain Why do we need to take an old photo of him and do a reverse aging to see what he looked like? Finally, a drawing of the Jack the Ripper suspect appeared in the London newspapers that virtually no one ever refers to…and it looks exactly like Kelly in the only photo we have of him as a young man.
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« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2015, 04:52:29 pm »



One of a series of images from the Illustrated London News for October 13, 1888 carrying the overall caption, "With the Vigilance Committee in the East End". This specific image is entitled "A Suspicious Character".
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« Reply #59 on: April 06, 2015, 05:06:06 pm »

Thomas Neill Cream was a doctor secretly specialising in abortions. He was born in Glasgow, educated in London and Canada, and entered practice in Canada and later in Chicago, Illinois. In 1881 he was found guilty of the fatal poisoning of his mistress's husband. He was imprisoned in the Illinois State Penitentiary in Joliet, Illinois, from November 1881 until his release on good behaviour on 31 July 1891. He moved to London, where he resumed killing and was soon arrested. He was hanged on 15 November 1892 at Newgate Prison. According to some sources, his last words were reported as being "I am Jack the...", interpreted to mean Jack the Ripper. However, police officials who attended the execution made no mention of this alleged interrupted confession.
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