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Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?

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Keira Kensington
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« on: April 05, 2015, 03:38:05 pm »

Jack The Ripper In America. Did Jack The Ripper Visit The United States?
By Thomas Byers



Where did Jack The Ripper Go When He Stopped Killing In London? Did he come to America And Continue His Crimes In New York City
Where did Jack The Ripper Go When He Stopped Killing In London? Did he come to America And Continue His Crimes In New York City
Jack The Ripper In America

The Ripper In America

Once Jack The Ripper stopped killing in London what happened to him? Where did he go and why did the murders in London stop?The answer to those questions may be very simple indeed. Jack the Ripper may have come to New York City where he continued his horrific murders. And the then New York police may have known but covered up the fact to prevent mass panic.

Did Jack The Ripper Come To New York And Commit Brutal Murders There In 1891

On the morning of April 24th 1891 a woman's body was discovered in a cheap hotel in New York City. The then Chief Inspector of the New York City Thomas Byrnes had said many times in the newspapers that if Jack the Ripper ever showed up in New York he would be caught in just a few days. The woman's body that was found on that April morning had been murdered in a most vicious manner. Her stomach had been cut open and her intestines were thrown around over the bed. And most shocking of all was the fact that some of her female organs were gone. Scrawled on the wall was a message in blood written to Chief Inspector Byrnes. It said " Okay catch me Boss " New York City went into a panic and the newspapers reported that Jack the Ripper had arrived in America.The murdered woman had been a prostitute and she had been seen going to her motel room with a male client at about 10.30 the night before she was found murdered the next morning. People remembered the prostitute was drunk and giggling and the man with her as silent and grim. It was reported the man carried a case much like doctors of the time carried.

Almost at once the New York newspapers had a great time at the expense of Inspector Byrnes pointing out that Byrnes had said he could catch the Ripper in a day or two if he ever made the mistake of showing up in New York City. And though the details of the murdered woman on that April morning were never disclosed to anyone other than that note written in blood on the wall it leaked out quickly that their were many similarities between the woman's murder in New York City and the London White-chapel murders known to have been committed by Jack the Ripper.

Inspectors From Scotland Yard Came To New York City

It is a historical fact that members of London's Scotland Yard came to New York City at least twice in 1891 to examine evidence and a letter the New York Police had to see if they could connect the murders in New York City to the Jack The Ripper murders in London. So they must have thought it was quite possible that Jack The Ripper had traveled to New York City and committed murders in New York City.

Three More Murders In Eleven Days

Over the course of the next eleven days three more brutal murders took place in New York City all with in a few miles of the first murder that took place on April 24th 1891. In all three cases prostitutes were attacked and ripped apart in a brutal fashion. And in all three cases female body parts were cut out of the bodies and taken away. But then the murders stopped. Why? There have been rumors for many years that New York's Chief Police Inspector received a package with a bloody body part in it and a taunting letter saying that Jack the Ripper was moving on to another city because he now knew that Inspector Byrnes was incapable of catching him. Inspector Byrnes denied this ever happened but some police and newspaper sources at the time said that yes it had happened and that it haunted Byrnes the rest of his days and that Brynes was never quite the same again.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2015, 03:38:34 pm »

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« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2015, 03:39:21 pm »

In October of 1893 a New York newspaper received a letter supposedly from Jack the Ripper and in it were details of the murder of Carrie Brown the prostitute who was murdered on April 24th 1891 in New York City. It is said the letter contained details that only the person who committed the crimes would have known. In the letter it stated that Inspector Byrnes wasn't able to catch anyone much less Jack The Ripper. If this letter was truly from Jack The Ripper it is the last known correspondence from him. That letter is still in the possession of the New York Police. A Police Inspector from London's Scotland Yard came to New York City and examined that letter and said to him the letter appeared to be in the same hand writing as the letters received by London's Scotland Yard Police.
So what do you think about the New York Murders. Do you believe it was the work of Jack The Ripper. Do you believe that Jack the Ripper came to New York where he committed at least four brutal murders in the spring of 1891. And what happened to Jack the Ripper if he did commit those four murders in 1891. Why did he stop. Where did he go. Its quite possible he simply moved on to another city where he continued to kill. But if so he took no credit for his crimes.

http://crazyhorsesghost.hubpages.com/hub/Jack-The-Ripper-In-America
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2015, 03:39:47 pm »




Was Carrie Brown Killed In New York City A Victim Of Jack The Ripper
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2015, 03:40:18 pm »

Jack The Ripper Revealed At Last

One Hundred Twenty Five Years after the Ripper Murders we may now know the true identity of Jack the Ripper. And not only do we know his name which is James Kelly but we may also now know that he came to America and killed Carrie Brown in 1891 on Manhattans lower east side. And as he traveled around America he may have killed women not only in New York City but also Georgia and Texas.

Medical Examiners who have examined the crime scene photos from the White Chapel Murders in London and the crime scene photos from the American killings say that the same person committed all the murders. James Kelly escaped from a London Insane Asylum with a homemade metal key and when he returned to that same Insane Asylum 40 years later he wrote a detailed confession telling of his travels in America. James Kelly has long been a suspect in the White Chapel Murders and now it is believed he also killed many women almost all prostitutes while he was in America.

And so we now know who Jack the Ripper was and what a horrific serial killer he really was. James Kelly in fact killed the wife in the photo above with him and he was in the insane asylum for killing her when he made the homemade key and escaped. And he killed his wife who we know he killed in much the same way as Jack The Ripper killed. He cut out her insides and threw them around the room. The horrible way he killed his wife is what sent him to the insane asylum.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2015, 03:41:32 pm »



James Kelly (20 April 1860 – 17 September 1929) was first identified as a suspect in Terence Sharkey's "Jack the Ripper. 100 Years of Investigation" (Ward Lock 1987) and documented in Prisoner 1167: The madman who was Jack the Ripper, by Jim Tully, in 1997.[95]

James Kelly murdered his wife in 1883 by stabbing her in the neck. Deemed insane, he was committed to the Broadmoor Asylum, from which he later escaped in early 1888, using a key he fashioned himself. After the last of the five canonical Ripper murders in London in November 1888, the police searched for Kelly at what had been his residence prior his wife's murder, but they were not able to locate him. In 1927, almost forty years after his escape, he unexpectedly turned himself in to officials at the Broadmoor Asylum. He died two years later, presumably of natural causes.

Retired NYPD cold-case detective Ed Norris examined the Jack the Ripper case for a Discovery Channel program called "Jack the Ripper in America". In it, Norris claims that James Kelly was Jack the Ripper, and that he was also responsible for multiple murders in cities around the United States. Norris highlights a few features of the Kelly story to support his contention. He worked as a furniture upholsterer, a job that requires strong handiness with a large knife. His escape from Broadmoor before the first of the five canonical murders and eventual escape to America after the last meant Kelly was in or around London at the right time. He also claimed to have resided in the United States and left behind a journal that spoke of his strong disapproval of the immorality of prostitutes and of his having been on the "warpath" during his time as a fugitive. Norris further argues Kelly was in New York at the time of a Ripper-like murder of a prostitute named Carrie Brown as well as in a number of cities while each experienced, according to Norris, one or two brutal murders of prostitutes while Kelly was there. Norris reported Kelly's Broadmoor Asylum file from before his escape and his eventual return has never been opened since 1927 until Norris was given special permission for access to it, and that the file is the perfect profile match for Jack the Ripper.
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2015, 03:43:06 pm »

How Did James Kelly Kill His Wife


In 1991 I purchased the documents where I got the story of James Kelly killing his wife in a brutal matter as described instead of just cutting her throat as is widely reported as being the story. Supposedly the documents I purchased at a London Street Market were the property of a police officer during the time of Jack the Ripper. It was told to me that the journal I purchased was the policeman's private notes about the Ripper murders.

It is a well known fact that at the time of the murder of his wife that murders were often cleaned up as far as to details to keep the more brutal details out of the London Press. It is said that this was done on orders of the Police Superintendent Thomas Arnold. It is a historical fact that the message written on a alley wall was quickly washed away on Arnold's orders and we will never truly know what that message said. Why was it washed away so quickly? What did it reveal? What did Arnold cover up by having the message quickly washed away?

The picture above of James Kelly and wife was in the papers but I do not know if the woman in the photo was the wife he killed. In the papers I purchased written on the back of that photo it said , " James Kelly and Wife ".


http://crazyhorsesghost.hubpages.com/hub/Jack-The-Ripper-In-America
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Keira Kensington
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2015, 03:55:35 pm »

 Saturday, April 3, 2010
Jack the Ripper in America?



Review:
Discovery Channel's
 "Jack the Ripper in America"
Discovery Channel documentaries are a mixed bag. Their quality science programs, like the “Life” series currently running, are informative and entertaining, but Discovery also presents the supernatural, in shows like “Ghost Lab,” with no distinction between fact and fantasy. So it was with hope and trepidation that I sat down to watch “Jack the Ripper in America.” It was not their finest hour.

Amid the obligatory swirling fog and Victorian trappings, the show is hosted by Ed Norris, a former cold case detective (the truth, but not the whole truth.) He is here to bring modern forensic methods to investigate an 1891, New York murder that was rumored to be the work of London’s Jack the Ripper. Norris pulls the police file on the case of Carrie Brown, a 58 year old prostitute, nicknamed “Old Shakespeare,” who was murdered and mutilated on April 24, 1891. The murder bore at least a superficial resemblance to the London cases; all of the Ripper’s victims were prostitutes, and as in this case, the bodies were severely mutilated after death. The detective tells us that a serial killer’s modus operandi is as distinctive as a signature and goes to London to see if he can find the New York killer’s hand in the Ripper’s work.

Suspects

“Jack the Ripper” was the name given to the unknown perpetrator of a series of heinous murders in the Whitechapel area of London’s East End in the period between August 31 and November 9 in 1888. The killer was never found and over the years more than a hundred suspects have emerged including such notables as Oscar Wilde, Louis Carol, and Queen Victoria’s grandson Prince Albert Victor. Several of the more likely suspects were known to have been to the United States. Norris considers three: George Chapman, aka Severin Antoniovich Klosowski — a prime suspect among Ripperoligists (yes, that’s what they call themselves)— moved to Jersey City, New Jersey in 1891; Francis Tumblety, arrested in 1888 on suspicion of the Whitechapel murders, took a steamer to New York City while out on bail; and James Kelly who escaped from Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum just before the murders and was known to be in America after them. (Also listed but not mentioned was Dr. Neil Cream, who poisoned a man in America and several women in England.)
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2015, 03:56:06 pm »

Though James Kelly has never been considered a major suspect by most Ripperologists, Norris singles him out as the one who best fits the 1888 profile complied by police surgeon Dr. Thomas Bond. He is also impressed that Kelly worked as an upholsterer, giving him access to large sharp knives. And, most importantly, he reads a copy of Kelly’s 1927 confession letter in which Kelly describes his problems dealing with society, primarily due to “all kinds of skank.” Kelly says, “I have been on the warpath since I left Broadmoor” but does not confess to any specific crimes. The letter also lists the itinerary of American cities that Kelly visited.


The documentary claims that Norris is the first detective to read the confession letter, stored in the National Archives. This is highly unlikely, since there have always been detectives, both public and private, among the Ripperologists, and they are remarkably thorough. In fact, others have read the confession (presumably detectives among them) and given it little credence. Here is a link to a timeline of Kelly’s life, including information from the confession: James Kelly.

The confession says that Kelly took a steamer named the Zaandam from Rotterdam to New York. Norris is able to verify that the Zaandam arrived in New York on October 7, 1890, six months before the Carrie Brown killing. Unfortunately there is no passenger list. Norris then traces his path through the cities of America and searching newspaper files, finds a Ripper-like murder in each one. He finds twelve murders in five states. To Norris, Jack the Ripper is an American killer who got his early training in England.

Forensic Evidence

Norris now attempts to analyze what he can of the 120 year old forensic evidence of the Whitechapel murders. He has graphologist Sheila Kurtz analyze the “From Hell” letter – a letter universally believed to have been written by Jack the Ripper. It was received by the president of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee on October 16, 1888,  in a box that also contained half a human kidney. Kurtz examines the slant and shape of the letters and decides the writer is a disturbed individual. Not so dramatic a conclusion you read the sentence she analyzed,

    “I send you half the Kidne I took from one woman and prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nise.”

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« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2015, 03:56:31 pm »

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« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2015, 03:56:53 pm »

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« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2015, 03:57:17 pm »

Forensic artist Steve Mancusi takes a 1927 photograph of James Kelly at age 67 and “de-ages” it on a computer to see how Kelly would have looked in 1888. They compare this image to a drawing made from 1888 witness descriptions of Jack the Ripper (presumably drawn by a different forensic artist). Since the descriptions include a big mustache and a floppy hat, Mancusi adds a big mustache and a floppy hat to his de-aged picture and proves that any two imaginary portraits will look similar if you add a big mustache and a floppy hat.

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« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2015, 03:57:30 pm »

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« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2015, 03:57:49 pm »

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« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2015, 03:58:03 pm »

For his climax, Ed Norris looks again at the photographs of Carrie Brown’s corpse. He points out that two large slashes on the body form an “X” (or a cross or a “t” or two random slashes, depending on your perspective.) The “X” he says is the Roman numeral ten, because this is the Ripper’s tenth victim. Where does he get ten victims? They are the five accepted victims— known by Ripperologsts as the canonical victims; Kelly’s wife Sarah; three of the alleged, or non-canonical victims murdered before August 31, 1888; and “Old Shakespeare.”

There are a number of problems with this theory. First, there are actually twelve non-canonical victims besides Carrie Brown, four of which were killed before August 31. Why arbitrarily choose three? If even one of the remaining non-canonicals was killed by the Ripper, or if one of the chosen three were not, then the theory fails. Carrie Brown is the only victim marked by a number and, though Norris has has told us that a serial killer’s MO is like his signature, he concludes that this singularity proves, without a doubt that James Kelly was Jack the Ripper.
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