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Hansel and Gretel: The Mystical Tale

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TWGilbert
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« on: March 23, 2014, 02:33:56 pm »

Hansel and Gretel:
The Mystical Tale


Long ages past and far away four chil-
dren made a home, with loving parents, kind,
yet stern, who pled that they not roam. Their skill
in navigating trails could help a blind

man see; for bread crumbs to a witches’ shack
could guide or help them flee, if they were caught
when curious while begging for a snack
of candy off the house’s shell they’d sought

like Crackerjack. So Hansel, Gretel, Fritz,
and Jan went bounding through the woods, and made
their way to Hecate’s while spreading bits
and goods of bread and fruit and lunch they laid

upon the trail they walked, and as they talked
and laughed and joked they left their pathway chalked.



The day was calm, the air was still, the woods
got deep and dark. The birds began to whis-
per softly, winds soon ceased remark. Their hoods
and cloaks got spritzed by rain that did not miss

their trail, but carried crumbs in rivulets
like boats without a sail. The stillness ech-
oed breath and broken twigs that sensed regrets:
through willingness to risk their dreams and trek

where time forgets. At times they held hands on
the trail, at times they stooped to stare, at all
the wonders at their feet, or birds in yon-
der air. There seemed to be a message call-

ing just beyond their reach, a silent teach-
ing lesson like a boat upon a beach.



The four of them were close indeed, but two
could not be taught, while life presented facts
and games these two resented thought. They knew
too much and spoke with ease, and chose their acts

through sense, and guessed not what rare clues denied
or where paths should commence. The other two
had wisdom pegged and looked beneath Truth’s hide,
to fathom through the hidden mists on to

blind facts supplied. All strolled into a clear-
ing and espied a house of treats, and knocked
upon the door which echoed sounds so near
repeats. The door they entered softly locked

behind them as they stared; a kindly chaired
old woman asked them all how they had fared.



Her eyes were deep and gentle and her cheeks
were rosy pink. She offered them cold wa-
ter that was spring fed at the sink. “What peaks
my sister Gretel’s interest and sends awe

through me,” said Hansel calmly, “is the can-
dy on the house we see. We are so poor,
have traveled far, we beg to seal our plan,
with all the treats that you could offer for

our sister Jan. Today it is her birth-
day and these treats would be a gift, that we
could have to celebrate this day that’s worth
a lift.” The kindly woman stared and free-

ly gestured they partake, all they could break
off with their hands, “It’s yours for goodness sake.”



She smiled as she said this, but she add-
ed graciously, “Is this what you have come
for, all these treats and what you see?” “I had-
n’t given it much thought,” said Hansel from

the door, “but, yes, the candy would be great,
can we come back for more?” “Of course, my dears,”
the woman said, as Gretel grabbed her plate.
The door unlocked, the two jumped out, their fears

weren’t in debate. Hansel and Gretel filled
their mouths and plates with treats galore, but Jan
and Fritz stayed in the house with faces grilled
for more. “We’ve traveled far,” young Fritz began,

“But we think there’s more here; please tell us, Dear
Sweet Lady, that what’s far is ever near.”



With this the woman beamed a smile that lit
up all the room. “So you two seek some sol-
ace that is rare within life’s gloom? You’ve hit
the jack pot, Dearies, for your choice is all

too clear, my oven is a doorway to
world’s greater that what’s here; for fire is
the heart of Being, teacher through and through,
consumer yet reliever in the busi-
`
ness of what’s new. I knew you two were com-
ing, so the candy was a ploy. You won’t
be missed, my Sweeties, for what can become
of joy? Please step in and remember, don’t

look back, I’m right behind; I’m glad to find
young ones so true, while those outside are blind.”



The oven doors rang loudly, while they o-
pened with a clang; as Jan and Fritz stepped through
the blaze, unscathed, the fire sang, and though
Hansel and Gretel ran back in to view

the noise, poor Jan and Fritz had disappeared,
sharp pains had swallowed joys; that crazy witch
had made them vanish, it’s what they had feared.
So Hansel rushed across the floor to pitch

in, as he teared, that crazy woman in
the fire, for evils she had done; he slammed
the doors and locked them tight; he’d end her sin
begun. Hansel and Gretel cried and scrammed

and fled that tragic scene, now stuck between
both loss and life; they’d tried to intervene.



Hansel and Gretel left that house and wan-
dered home alone. They hoped to tell their folks
some things of Truths they should have known. But on
that day a ripple danced in time’s strange jokes

and games, and opened briefly for two kids
who had high sights and aims, then closed without
a murmur, so what closed retained no lids,
no locks, no keys, no dark remains about
 
what Fate forbids. The story that we read
today reminds kids not to roam. But far
off in a fire raging still that’s need
and home, a teacher and two students are

at peace in realms so free, while learning pre-
ternatural existence vis-à-vis.

The End

















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