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The Curse of Oak Island (TV Show

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Valerie
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« on: September 18, 2014, 02:23:44 am »

The Curse of Oak Island
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Valerie
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2014, 02:24:20 am »

The Curse of Oak Island is a reality television series. The series premiered in the United States on the History Channel on January 5, 2014, and in Canada on History (Canada) on January 26, 2014.[2][3][4] The show follows the innovative and often expensive efforts of two brothers from Michigan, U.S.A., in their attempt to use modern technology to discover unknown treasure or historical artifacts, believed to perhaps be buried on Oak Island.

Oak Island is located on the south shore of Nova Scotia, Canada.[5][6]

On March 8, 2014 The Curse of Oak Island was renewed for a second season that will begin sometime in 2014. [7]
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Valerie
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2014, 02:24:39 am »

The Curse of Oak Island follows brothers Marty and Rick Lagina, originally from Kingsford, Michigan, through their efforts to find the speculated—and as of yet undiscovered—buried treasure believed to have been concealed through extraordinary means on Oak Island. The brothers became fascinated with the island after reading the January 1965 issue of Reader's Digest magazine, which featured an article on the Restall family's work to solve the mystery of the so-called "Money Pit."[8]

The series also discusses the history of the island, discoveries, and the sometimes fatal attempts to solve the mystery that has endured for hundreds of years.[9]

Marty, an energy businessman, and his brother Rick, a retiree and lifelong student of the isle, gained a controlling interest of Oak Island Tours, which reportedly owns most of the island. As seen on the show, Rick and Marty have engaged the assistance of father-and-son team Dan and Dave Blankenship, permanent residents of the island who have likewise been searching for the treasure since the 1960s.[10]
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Valerie
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« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2014, 02:25:04 am »

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« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2014, 02:25:40 am »

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Valerie
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« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2014, 02:26:08 am »


'The Curse of Oak Island': Slow Going
By Chris Conaton 5 January 2014
Excavations

Beginning 5 January, the History Channel offers a new entry into the stranger and stranger realm of “tough men” reality programming. As other cable networks have already covered crab fishermen, lumberjacks, truckers, gold diggers, gun shop owners, motorcycle customizers, and oil drillers, The Curse of Oak Island takes up treasure hunters on a small island just off the coast of Chester, Nova Scotia, about an hour’s drive from Halifax.

The first episode is a mixture of intriguing mysteries and frustratingly drawn-out storytelling. We learn the basics in an eight-minute opening sequence: Rick and Marty Lagina are brothers from Michigan who have been obsessed with the story of Oak Island since reading a Reader’s Digest piece about it back in 1965. Turns out that the island has a history of attracting treasure hunters that dates back to the late 18th century. At that time, a couple of kids discovered a hole on the island that contained wooden beams about 10 feet down, and every 10 feet after that. Stories about this hole spread, and over the centuries, many attempts were made to excavate it and all failed. Six people lost their lives in the attempt, and supposedly there’s a curse that says seven people have to die before the treasure will be recovered.

That’s a nice setup, but History attempts to spruce it up with over the top horror music cues, whooshing sound effects, and ominous graphics that inevitably fall flat because there is nothing frightening in the least going on in the plot. Interviews with Rick and Marty explaining the outline of the story and treasure possibilities—lost works of Shakespeare! Captain Kidd’s pirate gold! Artifacts left by the Knights Templar!—are intercut with scenes of middle-aged guys standing around a snow-covered island in February. All hope that an oil well drill comes up with some evidence of man-made material by digging close to the so-called “money pit.” At one point, one of the men says to Marty, “You know, we should be doing this in August and July when we’re not freezing our **** ass off! Whose bright idea was this, anyway?” Marty replies, “Well, you gotta do ‘er when you gotta do ‘er, you know?”

Shortly thereafter, the show cuts to its opening credit sequence and then picks back up with Rick and Marty returning to the island in mid-summer. Clearly, we’ve been watching an edited version of Rick and Marty’s “proof of concept” video that sold History on the show. The reason they were on the island in February is because they needed to get the TV show approved so they could go into full production during the summer of 2013. The fact that the seams are showing this obviously less than 10 minutes into The Curse of Oak Island’s first episode is not a very positive sign. Sure, viewers will likely wonder about the winter setting as well, but Marty’s non-answer might raise more questions about the intelligence of the entire enterprise.
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Valerie
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« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2014, 02:26:53 am »

Since making his fortune in the oil business, Marty has managed to buy up most of the island. He and Rick are working with the father and son team Dan and Dave Blankenship, who first went after the treasure back in the early ‘70s and now live on the island. Marty tells us that Dave is slowed by an injury that permanently disabled one side of his body, but that “he can outwork any three guys because he’s done physical work his whole life.” Later, when we see Dan, the voiceover tells us, ridiculously, that Dan is “the type of man that other men call ‘tough as nails.’” We get it: the Blankenships are real men’s men who were true badasses in their day. We’re apparently supposed to ignore the fact that one is hobbled and the other is too old and infirm even to cross the 140-acre island to watch them work at the site.

The Curse of Oak Island, by title and general aesthetic, focuses on building up the mysterious aspects of island lore. But in the first episode, the only unexplained moment occurs when some HD footage vanishes from the guys’ computer in the middle of a presentation. The rest of the show explains why and how the holes are flooding and Rick and Marty’s plans to get around it. We then watch them pumping dirty water into a dumpster and talk about scuba diving into a nearby cove to try and find the source of the flooding. None of this suggests a curse or conundrum, not even when Rick runs across an odd vertical wooden spike in the cove during low tide.

The pumping operation and the scuba plans are worthwhile first steps to getting at the treasure. But the former is not exciting television and the latter doesn’t even get started by the end of the episode. As The Curse of Oak Island documents the excavation step by step, you might anticipate that watching the show on a week to week basis will be akin to being there with Rick and Marty in real time this past summer. The series stops short of showing what the brothers are eating for breakfast and dinner and where they’re staying, but just barely. It spends plenty of time driving in the car with them as they discuss what they’re about to do for the benefit of the cameras.

At the same time, the premiere holds back information concerning the island’s history, such as how exactly six other treasure hunters died in this quest. The better to break up coming episodes from the monotony of slow digging, one supposes. Despite the pacing problems, though, the central mystery of Oak Island is engaging. But viewers may be not have enough patience or free time to see it through.

http://www.popmatters.com/review/177938-the-curse-of-oak-island-slow-going/
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Valerie
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« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2014, 02:28:34 am »

Season One (2014)
No. in
series    No. in
season    Title    Original air date
1    1    "What Lies Below"    January 5, 2014
Brothers Rick and Marty Lagina now own most of Oak Island. Determined to resurrect the 200-year-old search for treasure, they explore an abandoned shaft called 10X and use water pressure to pump material to the surface. What they find gives them reason to believe that the stories of something buried on the island may very well be true.
2    2    "The Mystery of Smith's Cove"    January 12, 2014
A scuba team that includes Marty's son Alex Lagina dives Smith's Cove and finds non-indigenous coconut fibres and anomalous stones. These findings appear to be evidence of unexplained activity in what has been conjectured to be an ancient, engineered shore area. Meanwhile, metal fragments and cat bones are found in the slurry from 10X.
3    3    "Voices from the Grave"    January 19, 2014
As Rick and Marty Lagina begin working to drain a swamp, they are visited by a woman who lost her father and brother to a tragic accident on Oak Island that gave rise to rumours of a deadly curse.
4    4    "The Secret of Solomon's Temple"    January 26, 2014
A visitor to the island presents Rick and Marty Lagina with his theory about where the treasure on Oak Island is located and the idea that the Menorah might be among the treasures for which they are searching.
5    5    "The Find"    February 9, 2014
Rick and Marty Lagina find what appears to be an antique Spanish copper coin that is the first evidence of treasure on Oak Island.
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Neart inár lámha, fírinne ar ár dteanga, glaine inár gcroí
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Valerie
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« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2014, 03:13:10 am »

 Jason Drake SinclairR • 8 months ago

One thing I think everyone has to understand about the money pit... until the last 1970s everyone thought it was all about Captain Kidd's treasure. Therefore it was all about treasure hunting and retrieval. This is since been shown as ridiculous. Even on Tortuga pirates never had enough organization to construct something that would have taken months and engineering involved. Now most of Kidd's treasure is accounted for so those theories are pretty much put to bed and are a fantasy at best.
It has to have been a military engineering project (or perhaps a well organized group like Templars etc) that had resources, resolve and skills to build this. These flood tunnels they talk about are amazing (and I really am curious to see if they can find the remnants). A coffer dam was built on smiths cove back in the 1890s (I think that is the timeframe) which revealed them - there is at least one photo showing them I wasn't able to find a digital copy to link here) but it was washed out before they could properly excavate (the north Atlantic is NOT forgiving).
The big issue with Oak Island (other than Nolan's surveying) is there was no scientific study, or slow measured "take it all down slowly and methodically" approach... it was all tear the island apart to get the gold and when they didn't find it they went backrupt or moved on. This in some respects changed when Nolan and Blankenship bought the island as this slowed down and there was a bit more concentrated search but always done quietly/privately without formal backing. It is not even an island anymore since the owners in the 1960s (prior to Blankenship) built a causeway to move escavators out to it and dig it all up. This disturbed all the flow in the back bays and would never be allowed today due to environment concerns. As an example my parents have wharf rights in the deed since their property had a wharf 80+ years ago, but to pass the current environment regulations it would cost them $250K+ to build (they can only use an escavator on a barge for example - can't go from shore).
In regards to my aforementioned gold chain.... in rural NS in the 1920s and 30s no one would have bothered to check the purity of the gold.... it was gold so some rich person in NY (I think they were bankrolling it) gave another $10K+ to keep digging. Different times than today to be sure where anything will be scrutinized and studied.
I am sure this will be 10 hours of TV and very little found and more questions than mystery. I would have heard I am sure if there was some huge world changing discovery (people talk down there).... Still I am interested to see if they find more clues that can help tie at least some of the "artifacts" discovered over the years and narrow the focus. These include (but are not limited to)
* Vials with traces of Mercury
* The parchment fragment
* Coconut Husk (it would take a hell-of-a big storm/current to wash the amount on shore that there is on that island)
* Spanish "scissors"
All of these (with the exception of mercury and manuscript theory) contradict each other....
The other interesting point is whether any of this is related to Nolan's surveying of the island and rock placements as he believes.
In case you are interested... the name Oak Island is because in the 1800s it was the only island in the bay with Oak trees. making it easily identifiable (which is very difficult from sea without buildings and other modern landmarks). This is not the case today. From a navigation perspective the key is Quaker Island. There are no trees on it. This would have been an easy navigatable point from the Atlantic... find Quaker and go due West till you find the Oak trees. I don't know if Quaker ever had any trees, but if you have every been there Quaker gets horrid winds (much worse than other areas) and the water is always choppy so it is possible that trees never got established.
Also New Ross Castle mystery is ~ 25 miles up the gold river which dumps out into the bay (about 2.5 miles north west) which is another interesting mystery and there is a possibility that this is all related....
I hope they simply don't destroy it all to the point that I can't continue after them in 30 years! (wink)
I've been following this now for near on 20 years... the builders and the reasons and engineering behind it are what interest me.
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Valerie
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« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2014, 03:15:00 am »

 SinclairR Jason Drake • 8 months ago

Hi
Jason, I believe you are correct in your estimation as to who might have built
it Templers (masons) I believe it was Henry Sinclair who brought the artifacts
to the island around the 1490's before or after he landed in the Plymouth Mass.
area. He was a Grand Maser Mason in the Scottish masonry and he built many
things including Rosslyn Chapel that is in the movie "The Devincci
Code". If anyone wants to investigate this theory just type in Henry
Sinclair and Oak Island. Having resources and the labor
to do this project is a must and then having the knowledge how to make it
happen is the next thing that was needed. I have been in the construction field
for over 20+ years and the fact that the original pit had logs laid so many
feet down consistently tells me they built a scaffolding system to the bottom
and left out the middle logs for a ladder system to the bottom of the pit. This
would allow stuff to be lowered from ground level all the way through the hole.
What made me think of this was the fact the logs were set into the sides of the
hole not just even with it. As for how the went about the treasure hunting I
think it was a bad decision and it should have been done like an Archeological dig with precision and care. If they get down to it and find there is some
thing of value there I still think it is important to discover with care so we
as a world society can appreciate the history and talents of our ancestors and
try to understand why they took such measures to build such a structure as this
hole.
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Salem
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« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2015, 02:24:17 am »

I was watching this show the other night. It isn't bad, though it is true that thus far it has not produced much. Interesting to see the history and landscape of Oak Island.
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