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THE SUFIS

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Author Topic: THE SUFIS  (Read 5518 times)
Bianca
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« Reply #105 on: September 19, 2007, 04:41:43 pm »





There is actually a 'trick' to it:

I found early on, that the best stories are with the pictures, if you bother to read them.
Most people seem to click on the pictures and ignore the text.
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mdsungate
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« Reply #106 on: September 21, 2007, 01:23:59 pm »

 Smiley  Thanks for the tip.  But how do you find the stories with the pictures.  Do you google image search first?   Cool
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Bianca
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« Reply #107 on: September 21, 2007, 04:56:24 pm »




Often, yes.  I know the drill with 'wikipedia' and it's pretty straight forward.  If I want more,
I click on a picture that interests me and then I read the accompanying story.

Often, they are travelogues.  But in the case of the Sufis, it was by witnesses mostly, or
members of the Faith.

It DOES  take time.  If I am in a hurry, there's always Wikipedia........
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Bianca
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« Reply #108 on: February 27, 2008, 03:50:24 pm »


                  









                                                            ' A T - Y S S W W U F







Patrick-André Perron

Mystical orientation, usually defined as part of Sunni Islam, although it represents an individual religious idea.

A person who belongs to Sufism, is called a Sufi. Nearly all Sufis are men. Sufis belong, and follow, the rules of an order, known as tariqa.

Sufism's aim is to gain a closer connection to God and higher knowledge. This is gained through communal ceremonies, where trance is widely used. Today there are less Sufis than earlier, some estimates run at less than 5 million in the whole Muslim world. Sufism's strongest footholds are now in Egypt and Sudan.

Sufism got its content and its rituals inside Islam, but it also picked up elements from older religious practices. Sufism developed gradually in the first centuries of Islam, but there is little proof of real Sufism before 800 CE (about 200 H). Sufism as a tradition has had many theoreticians, but has still been a practice mainly used among ordinary peoples, and often performed without much consent from the religious elite.

The core of Sufism is to leave the ordinary life, in order to close down the distance to God. And by reducing the distance between man and God, man also gets closer to truth and knowledge. The soul is seen upon as an element that can stretch out from the carnal body, and pass through the divine spheres. Even if few Sufis will claim that they can reach all they way to God, knowledge and insight increases the closer one manages to get.

Techniques vary, but they have three things in common: rhythm, repetition and endurance. The actual technique can be utterance of words or phrases, singing and dancing. It can in some cases involve physical pain, or acting out illegal acts.

There is little to find in the Koran that sustain the tradition of Sufism, and therefore Sufism have normally had big problems being accepted by the religious as well as the learned elite. Sufism has also had problems with surviving during modernization processes that have taken place in most of the Muslim world. Today Sufism will normally be performed in the countryside, and by people in the outskirts of towns that are so big that there are several cultures co-existing. Sufis are also often of a high average age, as recruiting among the young proves difficult.



http://www.pbase.com/perrona/image/86057568
« Last Edit: September 13, 2008, 08:50:54 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #109 on: September 13, 2008, 08:54:20 pm »


                       








                                                                    S U F I S






                                                     Secrets of the Koran Documentary



To Watch Click Here



To Watch Sufis chanting Click Here

To Watch Whirling Dervish Sufis Click Here

To Watch a film on Sufi Thinker Al-Ghazzali Click Here

To Read an article on the many aspests of Sufism Click Here

To Read the Skeptics Dictionary Article on Sufism Click Here
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________


http://www.williamhkennedy.com/occulthistory.html#su
« Last Edit: September 13, 2008, 09:00:32 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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Bianca
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« Reply #110 on: September 13, 2008, 09:29:25 pm »

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Bianca
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« Reply #111 on: November 04, 2008, 09:37:27 pm »





               








                                         Rome and Multan ‘to be made sister cities’
 
 



 
Wednesday,
November 05, 2008
by Schezee Zaidi
Islamabad

Multan is the oldest living city in the world and there is an urgent need to promote the rich cultural
and archaeological heritage of this ancient seat of historical traditions and legacy of ‘Sufi’ wisdom.

Italy would soon announce Rome and Multan as ancient sister cities due to their similar and rich archaeological and cultural heritage, and historical linkages.

Italian, Turkish and Pakistani scholars and experts expressed this view while participating in a seminar titled ‘Cultural Heritage of Multan’, organised by the Archaeological & Historical Association of Pakistan (AHAP) at the TVO House here on Tuesday.

Ambassador of Italy Vincenzo Prati was the guest of honour along with Chairman ECS (Italy) Ettore Marzocchi. Ghazanfar Mehdi, President of the Association, and Secretary General Professor Riaz Ahmad conducted the proceedings of the seminar.

Professor Khurram Qadir, Director National Institute of Historical & Cultural Research (NIHCR), Professor Naveed Zafar, Turkish scholar and Chairman Rumi Forum Mr Harroun, Dr Khurram Shehzad, and Professor Farhat were among the speakers, who shared their views on Multan through the history and importance of preserving its rich cultural heritage.

Italian Ambassador Vincenzo Prati said that a special ceremony would be organised in the near future
to announce Rome and Multan as ancient sister cities. He stressed that it is important to emphasise
the preservation of the ancient heritage of Multan for having its roots deep into the history of the
world as the oldest living city, with its unfathomable Sufi heritage and as a gateway to the ancient history.

“We must honour the past heritage not only to be preserved in museums but also as a thriving and
living entity with all its spiritual and traditional essence,” the Italian ambassador said. He stressed the need to work together to promote the archaeological and cultural heritage of the region and added that Italy is keenly interested in establishing an archaeology department at Bahauddin Zakaria University.

Professor Khurram Qadir said that to understand Pakistan, it is important to recognise the historical heritage of Multan that connects the Indus Valley civilisation to the world.

Ghazanfar Mehdi briefed the participants about the programme of the International Seminar on ‘Multan Through 5,000 Years’ to be held next year.

Dr Khurram Shehzad, who is working on a project for the preservation and promotion of Multan as a heritage city, told the participants that there is a huge policy gap that is creating hindrances between the need to promote and preserve heritage as a universal phenomenon because the heritage of Multan remains besieged in the hands of bureaucracy.



http://www.archaeologynews.org/link.asp?ID=345842&Title=Rome%20and%20Multan%20‘to%20be%20made%20sister%20cities’
« Last Edit: November 04, 2008, 09:45:45 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

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« Reply #112 on: June 02, 2009, 07:38:56 am »









                                                       The artist as a Sufi






AlAhram Weekly
June 2, 2009

Abdel-Moneim Moawad calls himself Egyptian to the core. Ahmed Darwish uncovers the deep emotions within
 
Artist, academic and designer Abdel-Moneim Moawad offered the public a treat at his recent exhibition, fittingly named Sufi Square, which ran from 4 to 12 May at the main exhibition hall of the Faculty of Applied Arts, Helwan University, where Moawad teaches.

Interpreting Sufi spirituality with a blend of Egyptian folklore, Moawad offered a glimpse of a spirituality wrapped in the folds of mediaeval design. His pieces brought to life themes of Islamic calligraphy and decorative patterns, packaged for industrial use as well as artistic expression. The collection brings fresh perspectives to Islamic art and takes it to new heights of creativeness.

The pieces he shows can be applied to curtains, carpets, clothes, stained glass and mosaic. They can also be used as full-scale murals in public places. Some of the exhibits are computer-enlarged sketches that have textile potential. Others evoke needlepoint and handmade carpets and scarves. One of his designs has already been used to produce a 9x15- metre carpet for a factory space.

A carpet of Moawad's design once won a prize at the Hannover fair. Thousands of pieces were produced and sold of this design. Oriental Weavers are among the companies that have used the artists' designs in their carpets.

Moawad also designs hanging carpets, and one of his pieces has been bought by the Museum of Modern Art in Egypt. Entire collections of his work have been sold in London, New Jersey and Paris. One piece includes a humorous touch from the mid-20th century. In a throwback to the times of the kerosene-lit stoves, now virtually extinct, it reads in impeccable calligraphy, "Come, girl, and unblock the stove, for it is leaking gas."
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« Reply #113 on: June 02, 2009, 07:40:42 am »









"Being authentically Egyptian can help one break into the international scene," the artist confides.

Part folksy, part spiritual, Moawad often conjures up the simplicity that used to be the essence of local life. One of the pieces now exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art is of a chair, a bed and a straw mat. He calls it, Ala Qad Halna (Within Our Means). It is a drawing done in black felt-tip pen, but with its amazing multi-tonality, it may as well have been drawn in charcoal. This attention to detail is what sets Moawad side from his generation. Another thing that gives him an edge is that he knew what he wanted right from the start. As a teenager, he studied at the Abbasiya High School for Decorative Arts. He actually drew that museum piece while still an undergraduate student.

Intensely creative, Moawad mixes art with spirituality. His use of colour brings elegance to his presentations of the common Islamic themes of the triangle, square and star formations. And yet his work converses with daily life through the frequent references to folklore. The black background he often employs adds mystery and depth even to the simplest of his linear formations.

That he can draw so much upon Islamic art is no doubt related to where and how he grew up. He has spent most of his life in the old parts of Cairo, the areas of Ghuriya, Gammaliya, Khayamiya, and Bab Al-She'riya. As a child, he had the chance to admire the complex ornamentations of mediaeval Islamic art as he walked past the Mosque of Sultan Hassan, the Rifaai Mosque, the Blue Mosque, the Muayyad Mosque, the Sultan Al-Ghuri Mosque and Madrasa, and the sabil and kottab of Umm Abbas on Saliba Street. His photographic memory retained those details, and a life of focus on Islamic themes, part of which he spent as a restorer, added maturity to his outlook.

Moawad's father was an Azharite scholar. Among his friends were the great Quran chanters of the time, men such as Mansour Al-Damanhuri, Ali Mahmoud Taha and Abdel-Fattah Al-Shaashaai. He still remembers listening to their recitals as a child and aspiring for the rhythm and mastery of their art.

Warm and affable, Moawad is intensely emotional. He tells me that once, after coming home to his neighbourhood from a long stay abroad, he was unable to fight back the tears.

Looking at Moawad's work, I am reminded of the great artists of the past. I am reminded of Mahmoud Mokhtar (1891-1934), the great sculptor; Mahmoud Said (1897-1956), best known for his inimitable portrays of Alexandrian women; Mohamed Nagui (1881-1956), a pioneer of painting; and Ragheb Ayyad (1892-1983), the man who brought expressionism into Egyptian art.

The critic Kamal Al-Guweili says of Moawad, "His work is like orchestral music: many instruments, many colours and a natural command that keep the whole thing together." The late critic Hassan Abdel-Rassul once said, "He is the artist of the earthen jar and the rababa [two- string violin]." I totally agree.
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Bianca
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« Reply #114 on: July 05, 2009, 11:20:35 am »




               






Whirling :

Dancers performs on the music of Mercan Dede during the openning show of the season of Turkey in France in Paris.



(AFP/
Boris Horvat)
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Bianca
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« Reply #115 on: July 05, 2009, 11:30:20 am »

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