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Morocco and Eastern Atlantis

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Qoais
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« Reply #1455 on: January 16, 2010, 08:54:56 pm »



Riad in the Atlas Mountains.


Adjacent to the village of Imlil, nestled in the High Atlas mountains region of Morocco, Riad Oussagou is firmly placed at the gateway to the Atlas mountains trekking region.

The Atlas mountains spread far and wide across a massive expanse of Morocco, leading from the Southern well known city of Marrakech, stretching to the southern beachside resort of Agadir and across to the countries Eastern desert region and Ouarzazete, the gateway to the desert.

Imlil, known as gateway to the High atlas mountains trekking activities is a village located at 1740 Metres above sea level, close to the mountain Jebel Toubkal and only 1 and a half hours drive from the hustle and bustle of busy city Marrakech.

Imlil itself originally existed to service the tourists who head there to start their trekking and climbing. However a real community developed from it's first beginnings and is now a flourishing community of locals and breathtaking scenery.

The surrounding valleys are host to real traditional Berber villages such asTamatert; Ait Souka; Tagadirt; Acheim; Taourirt n'Ait Mizane; Mzikene and Arhrene.

Jebel Toubkal, standing at 4,167 Metres is the highest peak in the Atlas mountain range of North Africa.

Located 63Km from the southern Morocco city of Marrakech, it is faveourite climb of trekkers and visitors to the region.

From May onwards, the region enjoys a relatively warm summer climate, yet offering a cooler alternative to the interior cities of Marrakech and Ouarzazete.

Beautiful scenery, fresh mountain air and the kind hospitality of the local Berber population ensure that this mountain remains a firm favorite amongst visitors.

http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.riadoussagou.com/images/a.JPG&imgrefurl=http://www.riadoussagou.com/high_atlas_6.html&usg=__hc_OjpSSBZkp21wWkq69x-HkUxg=&h=548&w=730&sz=110&hl=en&start=195&sig2=vaetkqU-7d72UUwypq_Rfw&um=1&tbnid=Mnoqu6-5vLgKwM:&tbnh=106&tbnw=141&prev=/images%3Fq%3DAtlas%2BMountains%26ndsp%3D18%26hl%3Den%26rlz%3D1C1CHNH_enCA324CA344%26sa%3DN%26start%3D180%26um%3D1&ei=xO9RS42QGqiQtAOio5T8Bw
« Last Edit: January 16, 2010, 08:56:21 pm by Qoais » Report Spam   Logged

An open-minded view of the past allows for an unprejudiced glimpse into the future.

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mdsungate
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« Reply #1456 on: January 17, 2010, 09:01:25 am »

 Smiley  Senic, but there are taller mountains in the Alps, north of Greece that would have been more fitting to name after Atlas.  Perhaps those mountains were under the glacier covering Europe at that point in ancient times.  I still wonder just what event changed the entire world 12,500 years ago.  Morocco and the rest of north Africa was apparently wetter and more lush, Europe was frozen and under ice, as well as North America.  It would seem as though everything was further north, and that would have put Morocco in a more temperate zone, which would explain a lot.
 Wink
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Qoais
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« Reply #1457 on: January 17, 2010, 07:41:38 pm »

I'm not sure what you mean about Morocco being in a more temperate zone during the ice age "which would explain a lot".  People did move ahead of the ice farther and farther south to where they could survive.  So if Morocco was milder then, people would likely stay in the area.  Especially if that area was more lush then, than now.
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mdsungate
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« Reply #1458 on: January 18, 2010, 07:42:42 am »

 Smiley  LOL, that's exactly what I'm saying.  Although Northern Africa is baren, dry and largely inhospitable today, 12,500 years ago it was lush, green and probably boasted thriving civilizations.  Something changed the world climate, although exactly what triggered that is not clear yet.  Whatever happened caused the super glaciers in North America and Europe to melt, and eventually turned North Africa into a dry barren desert. 

Although Plato's tale may not bear up under investigation, the dialogue does single out a time period which geology has also identified as significant.  We might also assume that this lush fertile plain, with thriving civilizations would be a target for an aggressive sea faring island continent just off the coast of Northern Africa.  If Morocco itself was not Atlantis, if should at least offer some evidence of a culture which once conquered it, as Plato’s dialogues imply. 
 Wink
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Qoais
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« Reply #1459 on: January 18, 2010, 05:25:47 pm »

Yes, it SHOULD offer some evidence, but so far, it doesn't.  Or should I say, none that seems to say definitively "Atlantis was here".  We have the fabulous cave paintings in the south of Spain, but that doesn't mean the people who drew the artwork were "Atlanteans".  It means there was some talented people in the area about 18,000 years ago.
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« Reply #1460 on: January 18, 2010, 09:35:11 pm »



Miss Morocco 2007
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« Reply #1461 on: January 22, 2010, 05:52:04 pm »

Marrakesh lamp shop.

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« Reply #1462 on: January 22, 2010, 07:17:44 pm »

Moroccan Money

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« Reply #1463 on: January 29, 2010, 07:29:39 pm »

Marrakesh from the air.

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« Reply #1464 on: January 29, 2010, 07:38:40 pm »



A village of the Ait Mizane tribe in the High Atlas mountains. You can see that the houses are built of stone in this area. Thatched roofs are the rule.

The stream you see here is an irrigation channel which is derived from the main stream running down through their valley. Like the roots of a tree, the irrigation system flows from water channeled off the main stream by a simple dam; the water runs down hill in ever-smaller channels, ultimately branching into channels that run through the fields.

Like the approach to work in the fields in this region, the irrigation system is developed along lines that are cooperative and rotative. Everyone contributes labor to build and maintain the system. When water is distributed out to the fields, it is monitored and divided in a constant round up and down a list. When water is available for your field, you'd better be there, or else you'll miss your turn until next time. And that could be as much as a week away.
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« Reply #1465 on: January 29, 2010, 08:13:47 pm »



Potter's wheel
Tafilalt Oasis

A potter in the Tafilalt oasis of southeastern Morocco. You can see that his wheel is turned by foot pedal and that his shed is itself made of cast-off pieces of his art. This work is age-old and a major product is shown here: the tall amphora used to hold drinking water.
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« Reply #1466 on: February 02, 2010, 06:38:13 pm »

Morocco

Background:

In 788, about a century after the Arab conquest of North Africa, successive Moorish dynasties began to rule in Morocco. In the 16th century, the Sa'adi monarchy, particularly under Ahmad AL-MANSUR (1578-1603), repelled foreign invaders and inaugurated a golden age. In 1860, Spain occupied northern Morocco and ushered in a half century of trade rivalry among European powers that saw Morocco's sovereignty steadily erode; in 1912, the French imposed a protectorate over the country. A protracted independence struggle with France ended successfully in 1956. The internationalized city of Tangier and most Spanish possessions were turned over to the new country that same year. Morocco virtually annexed Western Sahara during the late 1970s, but final resolution on the status of the territory remains unresolved. Gradual political reforms in the 1990s resulted in the establishment of a bicameral legislature, which first met in 1997. The country has made improvements in human rights under King MOHAMMED VI and its press is moderately free, but the government occasionally takes action against journalists who report on three broad subjects considered to be taboo: the monarchy, Islam, and the status of Western Sahara. Despite the continuing reforms, ultimate authority remains in the hands of the monarch.
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« Reply #1467 on: February 02, 2010, 06:40:38 pm »

Economy - overview:

Economic policies pursued since 2003 by King Mohammed VI have brought macroeconomic stability to the country, improved financial sector performance, and made steady progress in developing the services and industrial sectors. The National Initiative for Human Development (INDH), a $2 billion initiative launched by the King in 2005, has improved social welfare through a successful rural electrification program, an overhaul of the tourism and agriculture sectors, and the gradual replacement of urban slums with decent housing. Despite the INDH's success, Morocco continues to grapple with a high illiteracy rate, a low education enrollment rate, and a high urban youth unemployment rate of around 30%. Moroccan exports have dropped sharply since mid-2008 as a result of the decline in global phosphates prices--the bulk of Moroccan exports by value--and the global economic slowdown. The economic slowdown in Europe--Morocco's main export market--also prompted a decline in the flow of foreign tourists and remittances, two primary sources of foreign currency. A record agricultural harvest, strong government spending, and domestic consumption, however, combined to partly offset losses from weak exports and helped GDP grow at a weak but positive 2.6% in 2009. Despite structural adjustment programs supported by the IMF, the World Bank, and the Paris Club, the dirham is only fully convertible for selected transactions. In 2006, Morocco entered a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the US, and in 2008 entered into an advanced status in its 2000 Association Agreement with the EU. Long-term challenges include improving education and job prospects for Morocco's youth, closing the income gap between the rich and the poor, confronting corruption, and expanding and diversifying exports beyond phosphates and low-value added products.

https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/mo.html
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« Reply #1468 on: February 19, 2010, 06:44:44 pm »

Death toll from Morocco mosque collapse rises to 25



RABAT, Feb. 19 (Xinhua) -- Death toll from a partial collapse of a mosque during a Friday prayer in Morocco rose to 25, a civil protection official told Xinhua.

The minaret and part of the ceiling of the 16th-century Khnata bent Bekkar mosque in the northern city of Meknes broke down onto the courtyard when worshippers were about to perform the Friday prayer.

The number of injured people also rose to 50, Meknes civil protection chief al-Elwi al-Ismaili said.

The rescue operation is still ongoing, the official added.

Official reports said medical teams rushed to the mosque, located near Bab Baradein district in the old city of Meknes, to provide medical care for the wounded.

Pan-Arab al-Jazeera TV earlier reported that seven people were killed and 47 others injured by the mosque collapse in the North African country.
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« Reply #1469 on: April 03, 2010, 02:31:39 am »

Cascades D'Ouzoud waterfalls in High Atlas

The highest and most beautiful water falls of Morocco are the Cascades d'Ouzoud, about two hours drive from Marrakesh. The fall is one hundred metres high and cascades down over several levels.

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