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Genesis


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Author Topic: Genesis  (Read 302 times)
Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2012, 12:48:53 am »

1976–1977: The four-man era

The group auditioned reportedly over 400 lead singers to find a replacement for Gabriel. Phil Collins, who had provided backing vocals, coached prospective replacements.[21] Eventually, the band decided to use Collins as the lead vocalist[22] for 1976's A Trick of the Tail. The new producer David Hentschel, who had served as engineer on Nursery Cryme, gave the album a clearer-sounding production. Music historians later commented that Collins sounded "more like Gabriel than Gabriel did".[23]

Despite the success of the album, the group remained concerned with their live shows, which now lacked Gabriel's elaborate costume changes and dramatic behaviour. Since Collins required the assistance of a second drummer while he sang, Bill Bruford, drummer for Yes and King Crimson was hired[24] for the 1976 tour. Their first live performance without Peter Gabriel, and the first with Collins as lead singer, was on 26 March 1976, in London, Ontario, Canada.[25]
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2012, 12:49:24 am »

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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2012, 12:49:44 am »

Later that year, Genesis recorded Wind & Wuthering, the first of two albums recorded at the Relight Studios in Hilvarenbeek in the Netherlands.[4] Released in December 1976,[26] the album took the second part of its title from Emily Brontë's novel Wuthering Heights, whose last lines—"how anyone could ever imagine unquiet slumbers for the sleepers in that quiet earth"—inspired the titles of the seventh and eighth tracks.[27]

For the 1977 Genesis tour, the jazz fusion-trained Chester Thompson—a veteran of Weather Report and Frank Zappa—took on live drumming duties. Collins's approach to Genesis shows differed from the theatrical performances of Gabriel, and his interpretations of older songs were lighter and more subtle. At the 1982 Milton Keynes reunion show, Gabriel admitted that Collins sang the songs "better", though never "quite like" him.[28]
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2012, 12:50:28 am »



    "The moonlit knight" Genesis, Massey Hall, Toronto, Oct. 1974
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2012, 12:51:11 am »




Mike Rutherford (with Phil Collins) of Genesis live in concert @ Empire Theatre, Liverpool
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2012, 12:51:41 am »

Guitarist Hackett had become increasingly disenchanted with the band by the time of Wind & Wuthering's release,[18] and he felt confined. He was the first member of the band to record a solo album, 1975's Voyage of the Acolyte, and greatly enjoyed the feelings of control over the recording process that working within a group could not provide. Hackett had asked that a quarter of Wind & Wuthering be allocated to Hackett's songs, which Collins described as "a dumb way to work in a band context".[29] While Hackett was given songwriting credits on the instrumental track "Unquiet Slumbers for the Sleepers..."/"...In That Quiet Earth" , the Hackett/Collins "Blood on the Rooftops" was never performed live, and his song "Please Don't Touch" (which appeared as the title track to his 1978 solo album) was rejected by the rest of the band, who opted for the shorter and catchier instrumental "Wot Gorilla?" which closes Side 1. Hackett left the band following the release of the 1977 Spot the Pigeon EP while the band were mixing the live album Seconds Out, which was recorded during the 1976 and 1977 tours.
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2012, 12:52:17 am »



Peter Gabriel, Chateau Neuf, Oslo, Norway
Date    31 August 1978
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #22 on: December 01, 2012, 12:52:33 am »

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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #23 on: December 01, 2012, 12:53:13 am »

1978–1979: And Then There Were Three

Following the departure of Hackett, Rutherford took on guitar duties in the studio and the band were getting closer to a balance of what each member provided from a creative standpoint. The group decided to continue as a trio, a fact they acknowledged in the title of the 1978 album ...And Then There Were Three.... The album was a further move away from lengthy progressive epics, and yielded their first American radio hit, "Follow You Follow Me", whose popularity led to ...And Then There Were Three... being the band's first US Platinum-certified album.[30]

For live performances that year, Rutherford alternated again between guitar and bass with American Daryl Stuermer, formerly guitarist with French born violinist Jean-Luc Ponty's instrumental jazz fusion / jazz rock band. Generally, Rutherford played the guitar pieces he composed during the most recent album, but stuck with bass for all of the material recorded prior to 1978. Their 1978 world tour took them across North America, over to Europe, back to North America, and, eventually, to their first performances in Japan at the end of 1978. As the headline act, Genesis performed their first concert at Knebworth in Hertfordshire on 24 June 1978.[31][32] On 29 July 1978, the band made their second appearance at Madison Square Garden, New York.[33] Genesis would play this venue again on all subsequent US tours except for the 1992 We Can't Dance tour (where they played Giants Stadium).[34]
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2012, 12:53:37 am »

As the band had been recording and touring constantly since the winter of 1977–78, it was decided by Banks, Collins, and Rutherford to take the majority of 1979 off. Collins had previously informed his bandmates that he needed to attempt to save his marriage by following his wife to her new home in Vancouver. If they planned to go back into the studio, they were going to have to count him out. Banks and Rutherford responded by proposing that the band go into hiatus while he sorted out his family issues and record solo material in the meantime.
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2012, 12:53:58 am »

1980–1984: Breakout mainstream success

After his attempt to save his marriage (which ended in divorce), Collins returned to the UK in August 1979, and found himself in a holding pattern while Banks and Rutherford were working on solo recordings. With time to spare and new equipment in his home, Collins immersed himself in the recording of home demos that would become his first solo album Face Value (released in 1981) and provide two songs for the upcoming Genesis project. In addition, he rejoined jazz fusion / jazz rock band Brand X for their 1979 tour, and appeared on their album Product.[35]
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2012, 12:54:19 am »

When the three bandmates came back together to begin recording their next album from October to December 1979, Duke (1980), the product was much more the result of all three working together equally. Duke was the real transition from their 1970s progressive rock sound to the 1980s pop era.[18] The use of a drum machine became a consistent element on subsequent Genesis albums, as well as on Collins's solo releases. The first Genesis song to feature a drum machine was the Duke track "Duchess". The more commercial Duke was well received by the mainstream media, and was the band's first UK number one album, while the tracks "Misunderstanding" and "Turn It On Again" became live performance favourites.

Duke was followed by Abacab (1981), which features a collaboration with the Earth, Wind & Fire horn section on the track "No Reply at All". Much of the album's rehearsals took place at The Farm, the band's newly-built studio in Surrey, and the site where all of their subsequent albums were recorded. The album used a forceful drum sound which used an effect called gated reverb, which uses a live—or artificially reverberated—sound relayed through a noise gate set, which rapidly cuts off when a particular volume threshold is reached. This results in a powerful "live" sounding, yet controlled, drum ambiance. The distinctive sound was first developed by Peter Gabriel, Phil Collins, and their co-producer/engineer Hugh Padgham, when Collins was recording the backing track for "Intruder", the first song on Gabriel's 1980 solo album. The technique, in addition to Padgham's production, had been apparent on Phil Collins's first solo album Face Value (1981). The "gated" drum sound would become an audio trademark of future Genesis and Collins albums.[36]

The Abacab tour also marked the first public appearances of the Vari-Lite automated moving light system, the development of which had been paid for by the band and their management.
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2012, 12:54:39 am »

In 1982, the band released the live double album Three Sides Live. The US version LP contains three sides of live material — hence the album's title — in addition to a side of studio material. The studio material includes the song "Paperlate", which again features an Earth, Wind and Fire horn section. In the UK and the rest of Europe, the studio material was replaced by a fourth side of live recordings from previous tours. 1982 closed with a one-off performance alongside Gabriel and Hackett at the Milton Keynes Bowl, under the name Six of the Best. The concert was hastily put together to help raise money for Gabriel's WOMAD project, which at the time was suffering from considerable financial hardship.[37] Hackett, who arrived late from South America, performed the final two songs of the show ("I Know What I Like (in Your Wardrobe)" and "The Knife") with his former bandmates.

1983's eponymous Genesis album became their third consecutive number one album in the UK. The album includes the radio-friendly tracks "Mama" and "That's All". The track "Just a Job to Do" was later used as the theme song for 1985's ABC detective drama The Insiders. The final cut to hit the airwaves was "Taking It All Too Hard", which in addition to being highly played on AOR radio, crossed over to soft rock radio stations and became a fixture for 20 years. The album became a worldwide success.
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2012, 12:54:58 am »

1985–1996: Height of popularity and Collins's departure

Genesis's highest-selling album, Invisible Touch, was released in 1986, at the height of Collins's popularity as a solo artist. The album yielded five US Top 5 singles: "Throwing It All Away", "In Too Deep", "Tonight, Tonight, Tonight", "Land of Confusion" and "Invisible Touch". The title track reached No. 1 in the United States; the only Genesis song to do so; however, it stalled at No. 15 in the UK. In September 1986, Genesis performed "Throwing It All Away" at the 1986 MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles.[38] On the last leg of the Invisible Touch Tour in July 1987, Genesis became the first band to play four sold out consecutive nights at Wembley Stadium, London.[39] Genesis was the first band to use Vari*Lite technology,[40] and the Prism sound system, all of which are now standard features of arena rock concerts.

Earlier that year, Collins viewed a spoof of himself on Spitting Image, a satirical British television show which used puppets to lampoon politicians and celebrities. He was impressed with the representation, and commissioned the show's creators, Peter Fluck and Roger Law, to work on the video for the "Land of Confusion" single. The video was formed as an ironic commentary on the Cold War, and played on the perception that the coalition's leaders were "trigger happy" with the nuclear "button". In addition to puppet representations of Banks, Collins and Rutherford, the video showed Ronald Reagan dressed as Superman. At the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards it was nominated for the MTV Video of the Year, losing to Gabriel's "Sledgehammer".[41] At the 1988 Grammy Awards it won the award for Best Concept Music Video.[42]
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Crista Rodenkirk
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« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2012, 12:55:25 am »

"Tonight, Tonight, Tonight" was used in a Michelob commercial—as was Collins's "In the Air Tonight"—while "In Too Deep" was featured in the film Mona Lisa.[27] The instrumental "The Brazilian", appeared in the animated movie When the Wind Blows, alongside a score written by Roger Waters. "The Brazilian" also appeared on "Magnum P.I." in its entirety in the episode "Unfinished Business". At the 1988 Prince's Trust concert held in the Royal Albert Hall, London, Collins and Gabriel performed together for the first time since 1982. Collins was drummer for the house band, while Gabriel performed his hit single "Sledgehammer". As of September 2007, the two Genesis frontmen have not publicly played together since, although they did play together at Gabriel's wedding in 2002.
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