Atlantis Online
November 20, 2019, 06:08:11 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: DID A COMET CAUSE A FIRESTORM THAT DEVESTATED NORTH AMERICA 12,900 YEARS AGO?
http://atlantisonline.smfforfree2.com/index.php/topic,1963.0.html
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

The Azores Islands: their Relationship to Atlantis

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 15   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Azores Islands: their Relationship to Atlantis  (Read 6959 times)
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2012, 08:38:17 pm »

Could the egg be the central city of Atlantis?

Or is the impact crater proof of Otto Muck's theory?
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2012, 08:39:11 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2012, 08:39:31 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2012, 08:39:49 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2012, 08:40:13 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2012, 08:40:50 pm »



Atlantis in its antediluvian context. Larger than Libya and Asia (modern Turkey) combined, Atlantis once dominated the North Atlantic, occupying a central location which made it an ideal location for the administration of Earth. Image from Was This Atlantis?
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2012, 08:41:14 pm »



The Azores Plateau section of the antediluvian world map in false color showing relative altitude based upon the spectrum, dark blue being the lowest elevation and red being the highest. The Azores are a chain of islands, actually the peaks of underwater mountains on the northern side of the plateau, that run over the mid-Atlantic ridge just west of the pillars of Hercules, exactly in the location that Plato described the island of Atlantis. Image courtesy Wolter Smit, Was This Atlantis?
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2012, 08:41:31 pm »

The following was taken from mysteriousworld.com

http://www.mysteriousworld.com/Journal/2002/Winter/Atlantis/


Plain as day, 1/3 of the way between the Pillars of Hercules and the Americas, is a vast, raised underwater plateau that runs over the highly unstable mid-Atlantic ridge. In the center of this vast, raised underwater plateau is a huge mountain chain. This mountain chain, though it once kissed the sky in the midst of the Atlantic Ocean, has since been humbled by earthquake and Flood, and is now reduced to a small chain of islands now known as the Azores.
The Azores are the last bits of the island of Poseidia which, according to Cayce, was the last of the Atlantic islands to sink beneath the waves. This was the Atlantis of Plato, the great island "larger than Libya and Asia put together", that had once terrorized the entire world. Though it is not currently known whether or not this submarine plateau has the cultural, mineralogical and zoological contents that Plato described, it does fulfill all of the geographical characteristics laid out by Plato's Timaeus and Critias and generally corroborated by Edgar Cayce, to wit:
It Is Located in the Middle of the Atlantic: "these histories tell of a mighty power which unprovoked made an expedition against the whole of Europe and Asia, and to which your city put an end. This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean". The Azores are located 1,000 miles west of the Pillars of Hercules, roughly 1/3 of the way across the Atlantic Ocean;
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #23 on: July 29, 2012, 08:41:47 pm »

It Lies West of the Pillars of Hercules: "This power came forth out of the Atlantic Ocean, for in those days the Atlantic was navigable; and there was an island situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles ... for this sea which is within the Straits of Heracles [the Mediterranean] is only a harbour, having a narrow entrance". The Azores are due west of the Pillars;

Its Size Matches that Described by Plato: "the island was larger than Libya and Asia put together" Asia, or "Asia Minor" is now known as Turkey, and the land mass shown in the topographic map (above and right) is approximately the same land mass as Libya and Turkey;

It Is a Convenient Waypoint between the Pillars and the Americas: "[Atlantis] was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent which surrounded the true ocean". In fact, all shipping lanes between the Mediterranean and the Americas pass through or near the Azores, which are the major mid-Atlantic waypoint even today, where ships can resupply without having to travel an additional 2,000 miles further;

The Western, "Sea" Side of the Plateau is Mountainous: "The whole country was said by him to be very lofty and precipitous on the side of the sea". The "side of the sea" is the side facing the greater part of the Atlantic Ocean, which is to the west. The Azores plateau has a mountain chain all the way down its western side, becoming the Lesser Antilles islands and stretching nearly to South America;

It Has a Large Plain Surrounded by Mountains on the North and West: "The whole country was said by him to be very lofty and precipitous on the side of the sea, but the country immediately about and surrounding the city was a level plain, itself surrounded by mountains which descended towards the sea; it was smooth and even, and of an oblong shape, extending in one direction three thousand stadia, but across the centre inland it was two thousand stadia. This part of the island looked towards the south, and was sheltered from the north." The Azores plateau is basically a flat plain with mountain ranges on the north and west side of the plain. There are some scattered mountains interrupting the plain, but these might have been created up by the tectonic and/or volcanic action that accompanied the destruction of Atlantis;

It Is Submerged: "But afterwards there occurred violent earthquakes and floods; and in a single day and night of misfortune ... the island of Atlantis ... disappeared in the depths of the sea". During the Ice Age, much more of the Azores were above water. Combined with a reduction of volcanic pressure under the continent, which Cayce argued was the primary cause of the sinking of Atlantis, it is clear that this plateau was once a mid-Atlantic continent.

So, based upon our analysis, the Azores are the most likely candidate for Atlantis — specifically, the island of Poseidia. Currently, only a few mountaintops of the original mountain range are still above water, but before the end of the last Ice Age, much more was above water. Magma pressure may have also been reduced for various reasons, causing the Azores to sink, and what is now the British Isles, western France and perhaps parts of Africa and the Americas to rise to the position they are in today.
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #24 on: July 29, 2012, 08:42:11 pm »



The topography of the Atlantic Plain under and around the Azores, from Zhirov's Atlantis: Atlantology - Basic Problems. The red rectangle indicates the level plain, "of an oblong shape" in Atlantis that was surrounded on the north and west by high mountain ranges, as it is here. The Azores islands are the tops of the highest mountains on the north of the plain. Note the location of the major (7.6) earthquake of 1968 (circled at the northwest corner of the plain) — Hutton believes that this was the fulfillment of the prophecy of Cayce that Atlantis would begin to rise again in 1968. Image adapted from The Hutton Commentaries
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #25 on: July 29, 2012, 08:42:31 pm »

Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #26 on: July 29, 2012, 08:43:45 pm »

Sao Miguel and the Azores: Misty Fragments of Atlantis
by David Yeadon

Most Azoreans have no doubts on the matter at all.

"Of course this is Atlantis!" Antonio Pinero insisted. We sat sipping coffee and aquardente (Azorean firewater made from the remnants of grape pressings) in an outdoor café overlooking the broad harbor at Ponta Delgada, capital of Sao Miguel island and largest town in the nine-island archipelago of the Azores. Antonio has been a modest, soft-spoken companion during my first hours in this little outpost of Portugal, 800 miles due west of Lisbon in the North Atlantic Ocean. But about this particular subject he tolerated no ambiguity whatsoever. From inside his worn wool jacket he pulled a much-thumbed book titled "Plato's History of Atlantis."

"Was Plato a wise man?" he challenged, obviously preparing for an extended semantic foray. "Yes, he certainly was," he responded. "Now please listen to what he wrote." He turned the grubby pages with solemnity. "'For in those days,'" he began, "the Atlantis was navigable for an island situated to the west of the straits, which you call the Pillars of Hercules.'"

He paused. "That's Gibraltar — the way out from the Mediterranean." I nodded; he nodded. "'. . .and from it could be reached other islands and from the islands you might pass through to the opposite continent.' "

He paused again. "That's America."

"Plato knew about America?" I laughed (a little).

Tony was not amused.

"Of course. Plato knew everything. Now hear me, please. Listen to how splendid Atlantis was: 'Atlantis was the heart of a great and wonderful empire which had ruled over the whole island and several others and she shone forth in the excellence of her virtue and strength among all mankind. The people despised everything but virtue, thinking lightly on the possession of gold and other property which seemed a burden to them; neither were they intoxicated by luxury. Nor did they take up arms against one another.' "

Tony paused and sighed. "We Azorerans are so like that. We are not rich; we want only peace, a good honest life — and friends. Lots of good friends. And plenty of good wine!"

We ordered two more tiny cups of espresso with aguardente chasers. Sunshine sparkled across the harbor waves. Behind us, the white stucco and basalt tower of the Convent da Esperanca rose from the ornately paved street. The whole plaza was surrounded by bright white stucco buildings with dark volcanic arches and windows. Shoeshine boys and the old fruit-vendor women in the thick shawls milled around the arches by the church, setting up shop for the day. Strings of red lottery tickets, clipped up with old clothespins, dangled from rickety tables. The smell of freshly baked bread wafted downhill from the little hidden squares of the old town.
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #27 on: July 29, 2012, 08:44:06 pm »

"But what happened to Atlantis?" I asked.

"I will tell you," Tony said, searching the wrinkled pages of his book for the right quotation. " 'But then there occurred violent earthquakes and floods and in a single day and night of rain all them men in a body sank into the earth, and the island of Atlantis in like manner disappeared beneath the sea. And there are remaining in small islets only the bones of the wasted body — the mere skeleton of the country being left . . . .' "

We sat silently for quite a while.

History here, of course, began somewhat later than the old Atlantis legend, around the mid-14th century in fact, when a Portuguese navigator recorded some of the islands on his chart and claimed them for Portugal. Further island discovery and colonization by both Portuguese and Flemish settlers continued slowly until the 16th and 17th centuries, when the Azores became important factors of trade between Europe, American and the East. Portugal later gave the Azores status as an autonomous republic.

"So — now you know!" Tony suddenly shouted. "This is definitely Atlantis, and if you don't believe me I will show you how right Plato was in what he said. We go to Furnas. Now. Okay?"
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #28 on: July 29, 2012, 08:52:25 pm »

We left the cobbled streets of Ponta Delgada behind and wound our way on narrow country roads up through Ireland-green valleys, driving past tiny cow-dotted fields bound by hedges of wild hydrangea. As we climbed, the volcanic spine of this 40-by-40 mile island became more visible. Way down at the western end was the great shattered cone, Caldeira das Sete Cidades, rising above a patchwork of fields and white-walled farmhouses with enormous chimneys.

Then came an undulating fantasy-land of tiny green cones, some cloaked in dark patches of forest, others nestled together like furry limpets across the central saddle of the island. Hundreds of feet below, on the northern coast, was the tight-knit town of Ribeira Grande, built on the edge of broken black cliffs with black sand beaches. Turning to the east, we saw more volcanic stumps clustering higher and higher in an alpine setting of shadowy valleys, pine forests and bare basalt outcroppings.

"That's Furnas, over there." Tony pointed to the tallest peaks. "When we arrive I'll prove to you that Plato was right. But first — watch this hill and see what happens . . . ."

We were climbing steeply now; wispy fragments of clouds ghosted over the narrow road; a wind billowed across fields bright with hollyhocks, lilies and dahlias. And then there was just space. We were suddenly floating in blue-sky limbo among puffball clouds.

Tony laughed. "Now look," he said, and I realized we had driven up over the lip of a volcano. There, 300 feet directly below us, was the ancient crater, two miles wide and edged by eroded crags falling vertically into a royal-blue lake — the Lake of Fire (Lagoa do Fogo).

The impact is mesmerizing. You feel you've entered some secret place not intended for mortal eyes. Far below, a narrow peninsula, cloaked in pines, eased into the lake, with a perfect white sand beach on its western side. We were the only people there; we had the whole magical place to ourselves for as long as we wished.

Good old Tony had foreseen our mood. Out came a basket of lunchtime delights, including two snow-white rounds of queijo branco cheese (made from a centuries-old island recipe of cow's and goat's milk); big loaves of still-warm bread with deep golden crusts; a thick wedge of magnificently winey Sao Jorge cheese (made on the nearby island, and truly one of the world's classic cheeses); slices of island-cured ham; a whole pineapple from one of Sao Miguel's greenhouse "factories"; and two bottles of Portugal's sparkling vinho verde wine.
Report Spam   Logged
Corissa
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1657



« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2012, 08:52:38 pm »

It was a long time before we moved on, and the mood of fantasy stayed with us. Winding down the long slope from the crater, we passed more tiny fields, vineyards and orchards bounded by 20 foot high beech hedges as protection against the winds that constantly buffet these islands.

While the winds and cloud cover can become tiresome, the Gulf Stream-influenced climate generally is one of "perpetual springtime," with temperatures in the 55- to 75-degree range, and rainy squalls mainly from November to January. Houses and farms also seek wind shelter behind high walls and are buttressed by enormous chimneys with multiple vents. Nearby are tall pyramidal frames on which corn is dried, and solid-wheel oxcarts with high wicker sides, still used for farm work.

We passed riders on horseback carrying 50-liter steel containers of milk to the collection point (often miles from the isolated farms); we saw yam plantations crammed in jungle-like valleys brimming with yellow and blue flowers; we passed tobacco fields and tall slat-walled drying sheds; we even wound around a tea plantation initiated by two Chinese experts in 1878 and bounded by hedges of araucarias and screens of Japanese cedars.

"Every time you close your eyes, the island changes," Tony said, and he was right. So far I'd explored less than a third of Sao Miguel and already enjoyed fragments of Irish meadows, Scottish highlands, lush Indonesian jungle, Alpine scenery with Japanese overtones, a volcanic moonscape and a Chinese-inspired tea plantation in a Kashmir-foothills setting.

Then we were suddenly out of the country and into the tight cobbled streets of Ribeira Grande, lined with endless one- and two-story rows of pastel-colored homes. The main street, boasting a series of ornate wrought-iron balconies, meanders gracefully into the central plaza, where a flurry of exuberantly styled churches and civic buildings sets the stage for one of the most idiosyncratic delights of the island.

"You won't believe what you'll see," said Tony.

And I didn't.
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 15   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy