Atlantis Online
February 23, 2024, 06:56:31 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Update About Cuba Underwater Megalithic Research
http://www.timstouse.com/EarthHistory/Atlantis/bimini.htm
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Cleopatra VII, Queen of Egypt

Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Cleopatra VII, Queen of Egypt  (Read 11256 times)
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #15 on: August 30, 2007, 11:31:11 pm »

Opera
•   Appears as a character in operas by Handel (Giulio Cesare), Carl Heinrich Graun (Cleopatra e Cesare), Johann Adolph Hasse, Jules Massenet (Cléopâtre) and Johann Mattheson (Cleopatra).
•   Cleopatra's Night by American composer Henry Kimball Hadley, based on a short story by Theophile Gautier premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in 1920.
•   Anthony and Cleopatra by Samuel Barber opened the new Metropolitan Opera House in 1966.
•   Kleopatra by Slovenian composer Danilo Švara
Ballet
•   One More Gaudy Night (1961) by American choreographer Martha Graham
Video games
•   Double Dragon 3: The Rosetta Stone for the arcades and on the NES and Genesis has Cleopatra as the final boss.
•   Bill & Ted's Excellent Video Game Adventure for the NES she is one of 16 historical figures kidnapped and left stranded in another time by time-space rebels.
•   Cleopatra: The Official Pharaoh Expansion Pack was the official expansion pack for the popular City building series of PC games by Impression games.

Ancient art—triumph painting, sculpture
The most famous painting of Cleopatra is one that almost certainly no longer exists now. Because the queen died in Egypt well before Augustus' triumph could be put on in Rome, in which she would have walked in chains, Augustus commissioned a large painting of her, which was carried in his triumphal procession, and which may have represented her being poisoned by an asp. The sources for the story are Plut. Ant. 86 and App. Civ. II.102, although the latter may well refer to a statue, and Cass. Dio LI.21.3 reports that the "image" was of gold, and thus not a painting at all. A painting purported to be this work was engraved in the early 19th century: it was said to be in a private collection near Sorrento. Since then, this painting is said to have formed part of a collection in Cortona, but there no longer appears to be any trace of it; its quiet disappearance is almost certainly due to its being a fake. For comprehensive details on the entire question, see the external links at the end of this article.

Paintings, Renaissance onwards

Cleopatra and her death have inspired hundreds of paintings from the Renaissance to our own time, none of them of any historical value of course, and most misleadingly depict her as a young woman at the time of her death; the subject appealing in particular to French academic painters.
•   Sir Thomas Browne: Of the Picture describing the death of Cleopatra (1672)
•   John Sartain: On the Antique Portrait of Cleopatra (1818)

Report Spam   Logged
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #16 on: August 30, 2007, 11:33:20 pm »


The suicide

•   Suicide of Cleopatra. Oil on canvas. 46×36¾″ (116.8×93.3cm) painted by Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, also called Guercino. Painted in 1621 and which hangs in the collection in the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California. It shows Cleopatra and in her hand a snake that she prepares to use in her suicide.
•   Cleopatra, painted by Artemesia Gentileschi,1621-22, of the artist's Genovese period. Pictures the queen in the act of committing suicide. Oil on Canvas. Hangs in the Amedeo Morandorri, Milan.
•   Cleopatra, painted by Artemesia Gentileschi, ca. 1630. Oil on Canvas. Collection of Fondazione Cavallini-Sgarbi, Ferrara.
•   The Death of Cleopatra, painted by Jean André Rixens, painted in 1874 and that hangs in the Musée des Augustins in Toulouse, France.
•   The Death of Cleopatra, painted by Guido Cagnacci, painted in 1658. Oil on canvas. Hanging in the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Other
•   The Banquet of Cleopatra (1743–5). Oil on Canvas, 248.2 x 357.8cm. Painted by Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770), which hangs in the National Gallery of Victoria, Australia, depicting the banquet in which Cleopatra dissolves her pearl earring in a glass of vinegar.
•   Cleopatra and Caesar (Cléopâtre et César) (1866). Oil on canvas. Painted by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1824–1904). The original painting has been lost, and only copies remain. The work depicts Cleopatra standing before a seated Caesar, painted in the Orientalist style.
Report Spam   Logged
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #17 on: August 30, 2007, 11:34:46 pm »




Cleopatra VII of Egypt dressed like a pharaoh presenting offerings to Isis, 51 BC. Limestone stele dedicated by a Greek man, Onnophris.
Report Spam   Logged
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #18 on: August 30, 2007, 11:37:02 pm »



John William Waterhouse
Report Spam   Logged
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2007, 11:38:15 pm »



Frederick Arthur Bridgman - Cleopatra on the Terraces of Philae (1896, oil on canvas)
Report Spam   Logged
rockessence
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1688


Using rocks and minerals to heal the earth and us.


WWW
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2007, 11:48:33 pm »

Isn't it great how you can easily read "CLEOPATRA" in the second line of the Stele above?
Report Spam   Logged

ILLIGITIMI NON CARBORUNDUM

Thus ye may find in thy mental and spiritual self, ye can make thyself just as happy or just as miserable as ye like. How miserable do ye want to be?......For you GROW to heaven, you don't GO to heaven. It is within thine own conscience that ye grow there.

Edgar Cayce
Tiffany Rossette
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 3188



« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2008, 05:00:36 pm »

Culture And Media
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Egypt: Tomb of Cleopatra and lover to be uncovered




Cairo, 24 April(AKI) - Archaeologists have revealed plans to uncover the 2000 year-old tomb of ancient Egypt's most famous lovers, Cleopatra and the Roman general Mark Antony later this year.

Zahi Hawass, prominent archaeologist and director of Egypt's superior council for antiquities announced a proposal to test the theory that the couple were buried together.

He discussed the project in Cairo at a media conference about the ancient pharaohs.

Hawass said that the remains of the legendary Egyptian queen and her Roman lover, Mark Antony, were inside a temple called Tabusiris Magna, 30 kilometres from the port city of Alexandria in northern Egypt.

Until recently access to the tomb has been hindered because it is under water, but archaeologists plan to drain the site so they can begin excavation in November.

Among the clues to suggest that the temple may contain Cleopatra's remains is the discovery of numerous coins with the face of the queen.

According to Hawas, Egyptologists have also uncovered a 120-metre-long underground tunnel with many rooms, some of which could contain more details about Cleopatra.

Born in Rome, Mark Antony was a military general and commander, as well as supporter of Julius Caesar. He was also Cleopatra's lover and bore him a son, called Caesarion.

After Julius Caesar's assassination in March 44 B.C., Antony formed a triumvirate with Octavian, also known as Augustus, and Marcus Lepidus.

Civil war ensued in Rome due to disagreements between Antony and Octavian, who was Julius Caesar's heir and who later became Rome's first emperor.

Antony was subsequently defeated by Octavian and he later committed suicide.

Cleopatra, who came to power at 18 years of age, was once the ruler of Egypt and considered the last of seven queens of the same name.

She was famous for her intelligence, her beauty and her political power.

Cleopatra who also bore Mark Antony twins, committed suicide after his death in August 30 B.C.

http://www.adnkronos.com/AKI/English/CultureAndMedia/?id=1.0.2103859346
Report Spam   Logged
BlueHue
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1126


il mio va Piano, sono Asino ?


WWW
« Reply #22 on: June 26, 2008, 04:55:17 pm »

Octavian made Caesar a God and himself as the Son of God,

 Marc Anthony denied Caesar the Godly Status because he was Caesar's
 political Heir and did not want the upstart Octavian to supercede him as the
Private Heir.
Report Spam   Logged

( Blue's)THEORY, locating"original" Atlantis( in Aden-Yemen.)
1: ATLANTIS =Fake=Latin name, original Greek: ATHE(=a Region in Aden)
2: Atlantic-OCEAN=Greek: RIVER-of-Atlas+also" Known "World-OCEAN(=Red-Sea)
3: Greek-obsolete-Numeral 'X' caused Plato's Atlantisdate:9000=900
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #23 on: June 26, 2008, 05:50:18 pm »



Part of "Der Tod der Kleopatra"
(The death of Cleopatra) ,

Painted by Hans Makart ,
1875,
Germany
« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 06:04:36 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #24 on: June 26, 2008, 06:08:31 pm »



Giovanni Francesco Guerrieri
Da Fossembrone

Sala Di Rappresentanza Della Fondazione,
Fano, Italy
« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 06:21:51 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #25 on: June 26, 2008, 06:22:54 pm »



Catherine Graf
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #26 on: June 26, 2008, 06:42:58 pm »



Unknown Artist

Museo Della Citta'
Rimini, Italy
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #27 on: June 26, 2008, 06:54:02 pm »

   


                                                          GUIDO CAGNACCI


                                                                 
« Last Edit: June 26, 2008, 06:56:00 pm by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #28 on: June 26, 2008, 07:03:46 pm »



Silver and gold Patera di Boscoreale
ca II century

Louvre, Paris
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #29 on: June 26, 2008, 07:12:06 pm »



Simonetta Vespucci as Cleopatra
By Sandro Botticelli(?)

Palazzo Medici
Florence, Italy
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy