Atlantis Online
December 04, 2020, 08:27:56 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Plato's Atlantis: Fact, Fiction or Prophecy?
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=CarolAnn_Bailey-Lloyd
http://www.underwaterarchaeology.com/atlantis-2.htm
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

D I A M O N D S


Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: D I A M O N D S  (Read 5193 times)
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #60 on: September 23, 2008, 08:43:49 am »










                                      Man names 4.68-carat diamond 'Sweet Caroline'






Mon Sep 22, 2008

MURFREESBORO, Ark. - The good times have never seemed so good for one Michigan man who found a diamond Saturday in an Arkansas state park. Richard Burke, a retired high school counselor and golf coach from Flint, found a 4.68-carat white diamond at the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro.
 
He named the diamond "Sweet Caroline," after his wife Carol and their favorite song by Neil Diamond.

The couple had been in Colorado panning for gold and hunting for fossils and then drove 950 miles to Murfreesboro to dig at Crater of Diamonds.

Burke, a retired high school counselor and golf coach, found the stone in a shallow ravine near West Drain area of the park's search area. The Burkes had been looking for about three hours.

The Burkes say they plan to keep the diamond and mount it in a piece of jewelry.

Assistant Superintendent Bill Henderson said Saturday's find was the 612th diamond found this year by park visitors.

"Surface hunting is very good at the Crater of Diamonds State Park right now because of the heavy rains the park received from recent Tropical Depression Gustav and Tropical Depression Ike," Henderson said.

The park is the only diamond mine in North America where the public can search for diamonds and other gems and keep them.

While the site has been a park, the largest diamond found was 16 carats. Before that, a 40-carat diamond was unearthed. In all, the site has produced more than 75,000 diamonds since the first discovery in 1906.

The site became a state park in 1972.
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #61 on: September 23, 2008, 08:48:55 am »













                                A Thorough and Accurate History of Genuine Diamonds in Arkansas






Edited by Glen W. Worthington.

Published by Mid-America Prospecting,
Murfreesboro, AR, 2002.
8” x 11”. Color. 137 pages.

Reviewed by June Culp Zeitner.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The author is right about his claims in the title. The book is thorough and accurate. He presents the fascinating story of the famous diamond deposit near Murfreesboro from the discovery in 1906 by an illiterate pig farmer to the creation of Crater of Diamonds State Park and the 2002 latest failure at commercial mining in the diamond bearing lamproites. The amazing fact is that although diamond-mining companies have failed, more fine diamonds have been found by individuals on or near the surface than at many of the world’s successful mines. The author’s careful records estimate more than 100,000. This is based on the 977,781 that have been registered and the many which have been found and never reported —including an almost eight-carat white crystal was sold on the spot just as it was collected, but never registered.

The largest diamond, the Uncle Sam, is 40.25 carats. The ten largest are all over 10 carats. Most of the top 30 have been found by casual diggers who only wanted to try their luck. The colors of the Arkansas diamonds are white, yellow, brown, and pale pink. Two of the finest Arkansas diamonds are in the Smithsonian gem collection.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:30:35 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #62 on: September 23, 2008, 08:50:05 am »










The author, a Kansas construction worker in 1978, talked with a co-worker during a lunch break who volunteered that he had made a trip to Murfreesboro and found $1,500 worth of diamonds. Intrigued, Worthington took a weekend trip to the crater. He asked a prospector if he had found any diamonds and the man replied that he had found 32 diamonds in 60 days. Later that same year, the writer and his wife quit their jobs and headed for Murfreesboro. In the third week of intensive gravel washing, Mrs. Worthington made the first find — a beautiful canary yellow diamond. Soon Worthington began finding diamonds, so he became a permanent resident of Murfreesboro. His adventures there (the splendid gems he saw, the unusual people he met, and his participation in the commercial mining attempts) make a “can’t-put-it-down” story. At least I couldn’t put the book down the day I received it until I’d read it all; and diamonds are not even close to the top of my favorite gemstones.

Several things tell me this is the author’s first book. The cover reads, “Written by Glenn W. Worthington” instead of just the name. Also, the publisher’s name and copyright are in the back of the book instead of the front. Many of the colored pictures, though historic, lacked the quality needed for good reproduction. The maps, line drawings, and some of the black and white pictures are excellent.

There is an awesome reference list, but no index; however, the table of contents is lengthy and almost as good as an index. In the acknowledgements (located in the back instead of the front), he thanks his wife Cindy for moving to Murfreesboro with him and doing the proofreading for the book.
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #63 on: September 23, 2008, 08:51:26 am »









There is an awesome reference list, but no index; however, the table of contents is lengthy and almost as good as an index. In the acknowledgements (located in the back instead of the front), he thanks his wife Cindy for moving to Murfreesboro with him and doing the proofreading for the book.

Until a few years ago, when diamond mining began along the Colorado-Wyoming border, the Crater of Diamonds area was the nation’s only diamond mining area. The wonderful finds, many disappointments, and weird events will make most field collectors yearn to go to the state park and give it a try. When I wrote a chapter about this gem-rich state, Arkansas, years ago for one of my books, I corresponded with a lady from the park whose teenage daughter, a polio victim, was an avid diamond collector. They wrote that nobody should leave the park empty-handed because in addition to diamond, there is a polishable green to black trachyte, pastel alabaster, chatoyant satin spar, and several varieties of quartz, including dark purple amethyst, lace agate, Montana-type agate, jasper, carnelian, and chalcedony.

Most people, of course, concentrate on diamonds. Worthington had an opportunity to revisit his Kansas lunch companion who started him on his diamond studded career by the exciting tale of finding $1,500 worth of diamonds on a weekend trip to Arkansas. When asked if he sold them, the Kansan said he still had them and quickly brought out a treasure box of sparkling quartz.

I think anyone interested in gems and minerals will enjoy this book immensely. Genuine Diamonds of Arkansas, as the author claimed, is both thorough and accurate, as well as fun to read.





June Culp Zeitner,


who has been writing for the Lapidary Journal since 1956 and joined the editorial staff in 1967, is the author of nine gem and mineral books, and helped start the National Rockhound and Lapidary Hall of Fame.




http://www.lapidaryjournal.com/books/genuinediamond.cfm
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 08:52:13 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #64 on: September 23, 2008, 08:57:54 am »



MAP OF ARKANSAS
Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #65 on: September 23, 2008, 08:59:29 am »



           








                                        History of the Crater of Diamonds State Park





 
People first began to suspect that diamonds might occur just outside of the quiet town of Murfreesboro, Arkansas, when the precious stones were found in the peridotite soil of Kimberly, South Africa. State Geologist John Branner knew there was an area of peridotite soil just west of Murfreesboro, so he gave the place a thorough surface search in 1889. Unfortunately, he didn't find a diamond.

The first diamonds found in Pike County, Arkansas, were discovered in August 1906 by John Wesley Huddleston. These stones were sent to Charles S. Stifft, a Little Rock jeweler and confirmed to be genuine diamonds. Stifft described them as blue-white diamonds, one weighing 2-5/8 carats and the other 1-3/8 carats. To verify his opinion, Stifft sent them to New York and states that "…after subjecting them to every test they were pronounced diamonds of fine grade."

Early in 1906, Huddleston, a farmer, purchased the 160-acre McBrayer farm to make a home for his family, a decision that would etch him into history. Huddleston recounted the first diamond finds to Tom Shiras of the Arkansas Gazette: "I was crawling on my hands and knees …when my eyes fell on another glittering pebble…I knew it was different from any I had ever seen before. It had a fiery eye that blazed up at me every way I turned it. I hurried to the house with the pebble, saddled my mule and started for Murfreesboro…riding through the lane, my eye caught another glitter, and I dismounted and picked it up out of the dust."

Huddleston sold his diamond-bearing land for $36,000. According to a book by Howard Millar, It was Finders Keepers at America's Only Diamond Mine, 1976, Huddleston became "… nationally famous, and had acquired the nickname 'Diamond John'." Although he was also known as the "Diamond King," he later met with some misfortunes and died a pauper, but was said to have had no regrets. He is buried in Japany Cemetery, about three miles east of the diamond mine.

The approximate location of Huddleston's first diamond find is designated on the diamond field by a historical marker on the south central mine boundary.

Huddleston's story is perpetuated as a part of the Crater of Diamonds story. He is a unique character in Arkansas history. And, his legend is celebrated in the park's annual June celebration of "John Huddleston Day."
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:01:04 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #66 on: September 23, 2008, 09:02:38 am »




           









Diamond Mine



Crater of Diamonds State Park is the only diamond-producing site in the world where the public can search for diamonds. And the policy here is “finder’s keepers.” The diamonds you find are yours to keep.

Visitors search atop a 37-acre plowed field, the eroded surface of an ancient, gem-bearing volcanic pipe. Prospectors enter the field through the visitor center that offers exhibits and an A/V program explaining the area’s geology and history. Park staff provides free identification and certification of diamonds.

The first diamond was found here in 1906 by John Huddleston, the farmer who owned the property. The Crater of Diamonds has changed hands several times over the years and several unsuccessful attempts have been made at commercial mining. All such ventures are shrouded in mystery, and lawsuits, lack of money and fires are among the reasons suspected for these failures. The mine was operated privately, and later as a tourist attraction, from 1952 to 1972. In 1972, the State of Arkansas purchased the Crater of Diamonds for development as a state park. The park is open year-round except for New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

Pets are allowed at all facilities with the exception of the Diamond Springs Water Park and Kimberlite Cafe', as long as they remain on a leash under the owner's control at all times.

The park features a 37-acre field of diamond bearing soil plowed periodically when weather allows. These plowings are unscheduled. Historical structures, old mining equipment, washing pavilions, and sun shelters are located on the field. Diamond mining tools are available for rent or purchase. Diamonds and other minerals are identified at the Diamond Discovery Center.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:27:16 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #67 on: September 23, 2008, 09:05:35 am »









Arkansas, The Natural State, is blessed with an abundance of geological wonders. Crater of Diamonds State Park, the only diamond-producing site in the world open to the public, stands out as a unique geological "gem" for you to explore and enjoy.

Here, you are invited to prospect in the park's diamond search area, a 37-acre plowed field that is the eroded surface of an ancient volcanic pipe that 95 million years ago, brought to the surface the diamonds and some of the semi-precious stones lucky visitors find here today.

Diamonds of all colors of the rainbow can be found here at Crater of Diamonds, but the three most common colors unearthed by park visitors are white, brown and yellow. Crater of Diamonds State Park is a rockhound's delight since, along with diamonds, more than 40 types of rocks and minerals can found here, too. These rocks and minerals include lamproite, amethyst, banded agate, jasper, peridot, garnet, quartz, calcite, barite and hematite.

In 1906, John Huddleston, the local farmer who owned this property then, found the first diamonds near Murfreesboro, Arkansas, and started the diamond mining rush. According to the history of Crater of Diamonds State Park, after a series of ill-fated mining ventures, followed by tourist attractions, the site became an Arkansas state park in 1972.

Within the park boundary, many remnants of old mining ventures remain, including the Mine Shaft Building, the Guard House, mining plant foundations, old mining equipment and smaller artifacts. Nowhere else is North American diamond mining history as evident or as well preserved as here.

Along with the diamond search area, the park has hundreds of acres of natural forest featuring a diversity of flora and fauna and offering visitors interesting things to do. Arkansas's natural and cultural diversity -- the geology, history, plants and animals -- makes Crater of Diamonds State Park a unique Arkansas attraction unlike any other in the world. You are invited to visit this one-of-a-kind attraction and experience the thrill of searching for real diamonds in the rough. Our park staff will identify your finds for you. And, the policy here is "finders keepers." Any diamonds, semi-precious stones, rocks or minerals you unearth are yours to keep, regardless of their value.



http://www.craterofdiamondsstatepark.com/
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:06:39 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #68 on: September 23, 2008, 09:10:56 am »



                





This Oct. 20, 2006, photo released by Arkansas State Parks shows a 5.47-carat canary diamond found
on Oct. 14 by Bob Wehle of Ripon, Wis., at Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, Ark.

The park is the world's only publicly operated diamond site where visitors are allowed to search and keep any gems they find.


(AP Photo/
Arkansas State Parks)
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:12:17 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #69 on: September 23, 2008, 09:14:16 am »



             

               
              Uncut Diamond from Arkansas
              (17.85 carats)

              Photo by 
              Chip Clark of the Smithsonian

              Ball State University
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:16:12 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #70 on: September 23, 2008, 09:19:57 am »




           










                    Arkansan Finds 1,000th Diamond of 2007 at Arkansas’s Crater of Diamonds State Park






By Guest Contributor
First posted on 12-13-2007

(Murfreesboro)--Denis Tyrrell learned about Arkansas’s diamond site, the Crater of Diamonds State Park, through a feature on the park that aired on The Travel Channel. He moved to nearby Murfreesboro to follow his desire to find diamonds in this 37 1/2-acre field of dreams, the eroded surface of the world’s eighth largest, diamond-bearing deposit in surface area. Since March, Tyrrell has successfully unearthed 131 during his frequent visits to the park, the world’s only diamond-bearing site open to the public. On Sunday, December 9, Tyrrell found the largest of all his finds, a 3.48-carat, champagne brown diamond. According to Park Superintendent Tom Stolarz, the light brown, gem-quality stone “is the 1,000th diamond find at the park this year.” He said, “The last year the park visitors found over 1,000 diamonds was 1994 at 1,421 diamonds found. The average is usually two diamond finds a day here at the park.”

Stolarz noted that Tyrrell’s rectacular stone is the size and shape of a piece of Chiclets gum. Like many diamonds in the rough, it has a very shiny metallic look. That sparkle is what caught Tyrrell’s eye as he was walking past a hole he’d filled while digging in the park’s diamond search field. He’d missed the diamond while digging in that particular area known as Fugitt’s Bank and found it, instead, while he was surface searching.
 
Tyrrell told the park staff that he plans to sell the diamond rather than keep it.

According to Tom Stolarz, the park policy is finder-keepers. “What park visitors find in the diamond search area is theirs to keep.” Diamonds come in all colors of the rainbow. The three most common colors found at the park are white, brown and yellow, in that order. The park staff provides free identification and certification of diamonds. Park interpretive programs and exhibits explain the site’s geology, history, and offer tips on recognizing diamonds in the rough.

In total, over 75,000 diamonds have been unearthed at Arkansas’s diamond site since the first diamonds found in 1906 by John Huddleston, the farmer who at that time owned the land, long before the site became an Arkansas state park. The largest diamond ever discovered in the United States was unearthed here in 1924 during an early mining operation. Named the Uncle Sam, this white diamond with a pink cast weighed 40.23 carats. Other large notable finds from the Crater include the Star of Murfreesboro (34.25 carats) and the Star of Arkansas (15.33 carats).

The largest diamond of the 25,000 discovered by park visitors since the Crater became an Arkansas state park in 1972 was the 16.37-carat Amarillo Starlight. W. W. Johnson of Amarillo, Texas, found this spectacular gem-quality, white diamond in 1975.

In June 1981, the 8.82-carat Star of Shreveport was added to the growing list of large valuable stones found at the Crater.

Another notable diamond from the Crater of Diamonds that has received much national attention is the 1.09-carat D-flawless Strawn-Wagner Diamond. Discovered in
1990 by Shirley Strawn of nearby Murfreesboro, this white gem weighed 3.03 carats in the rough before being cut to perfection in 1997 by the renowned diamond firm Lazare Kaplan International of New York. The gem is the most perfect diamond ever certified in the laboratory of the American Gem Society. The diamond is on permanent display in a special exhibit in the Crater of Diamonds State Park visitor center.

Another splendid stone from the Crater is the flawless 4.25-carat Kahn Canary diamond discovered at the park in 1977. Spectacular in its raw form, this uncut, triangular-shape yellow diamond gem has been on exhibit at many cities around the U.S. and overseas. The diamond was featured in an illustrious jewelry exhibition in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1997 that included precious stones from throughout the world including gems from the Kremlin collection, the Vatican, Cartier and Christies. And, in late 1997, the Kahn Canary was featured in another prestigious exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History in New York entitled The Nature of Diamonds. Former First Lady Hillary Clinton borrowed the Kahn Canary from its owner, Stan Kahn of Pine Bluff, and wore it in a special, Arkansas-inspired ring setting designed by Henry Dunay of New York as a special way to represent Arkansas’s diamond site at the galas celebrating both of Bill Clinton’s presidential inaugurals.



Other semi-precious gems and minerals found at the Crater of Diamonds include amethyst, garnet, peridot, jasper, agate, calcite, barite and quartz. Over 40 different rocks and minerals are unearthed at the Crater making it a rock hound’s delight.




Crater of Diamonds State Park is located two miles southeast of Murfreesboro. It is one of the 52 state parks administered by the State Parks Division of the Arkansas
Department of Parks and Tourism.



http://www.freshare.net/images/uploads/Dennis.jpg
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:22:22 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #71 on: September 23, 2008, 09:24:20 am »

Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #72 on: September 23, 2008, 09:28:21 am »

Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #73 on: September 23, 2008, 09:38:47 am »



               

                The crystal from which the Uncle Sam Diamond was cut, weighing 40.23 carats.

                The Uncle Sam was eventually cut to an emerald shape weighing 12.42 carats.


                Courtesy of Dean Banks




« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:45:07 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Bianca
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 41646



« Reply #74 on: September 23, 2008, 09:46:30 am »



           








                                                          Star of Murfreesboro





From Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia
 
Star of Murfreesboro diamond
- 34.25 carats (6.85 g) -


The Star of Murfreesboro is a 34.25 carat (6.85 g) blue diamond that is eleven-sixteenths of an inch (17 mm) in diameter.

The diamond was found by John Pollock at the Arkansas Diamond Mine near Murfreesboro, Arkansas. Pollock found the diamond on March 1, 1964.

It is the largest diamond ever found by a tourist at the Arkansas areas.

It was valued at $15,000.00 in 1964. Using the Consumer Price Index, to adjust for inflation, the 2006, value would be $95,452.47.

The Star of Murfreesboro was featured in the September, 1966, edition of the Lapidary Journal article

"60th Anniversary - Discovery of Diamonds in Arkansas".



The Pollock family still owns the diamond.

It is occasionally loaned out for display at museums and gem shows.





The Arkansas Diamond Mine area is now contained in the Crater of Diamonds State Park.
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 09:49:11 am by Bianca » Report Spam   Logged

Your mind understands what you have been taught; your heart what is true.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5] 6   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy