Atlantis Online
September 24, 2017, 05:25:14 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Ice Age blast 'ravaged America'
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6676461.stm
 
  Home Help Arcade Gallery Links Staff List Calendar Login Register  

Lost Treasure of Disley

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Lost Treasure of Disley  (Read 277 times)
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« on: June 25, 2012, 12:23:04 am »

Lost Treasure of Disley

By MJ.Wayland on 19 January 2012 .

According to folklore and historic records, a lost treasure chest is buried somewhere in Preston, a small village about 3 miles south of Hitchin, Hertfordshire.

Preston is like most attractive Hertfordshire villages, surrounded by countryside and currently enjoying the property boom although this means that many of the original families can no longer afford to buy a home in the area. Nearby is The Princess Helena College, an independent boarding school for girls who in the 1800’s took over a former Knights Templar Preceptory  (and name of the village) “Temple Dinsley”.

One of the best-known legends of medieval treasure in Hertfordshire are those associated with the Templars whose alleged wickedness caused Edward II to suppress the order in 1312 and take possession of their lands. Stories of their lost treasures are still told especially around places where the Templars were once tenants such as at Temple Dinsley.

In 1309 by Royal order the six Knights Templar at the Temple Dinsley Perceptory were arrested: two were sent to the Tower of London and the remaining four to Hertford Castle. If the Templars were tortured in an attempt to discover their treasure, their captors were thwarted. Neither the King, nor the money lending Jew, Geoffrey de la Lee, to whom the Templar’s lands were assigned in Hertfordshire, was to lay hands upon the great hoard of gold, silver and precious jewels in the casket said to be buried at Temple Dinsley. The King’s action to arrest the Templars must have been influenced by France’s dissolution of the Templars. What is even stranger is that according to contemporary records dating from 1216 state that Temple Dinsley was “a small and poor foundation”, but the King continued his pursuit of the treasure.

A Royal Commission, set up in 1309, “to inquire touching concealed goods of the Templars in the County of Hertfordshire”, found nothing, nor did the two men granted a patent to dig for treasure at Temple Dinsley by Edward III on condition that the Crown took half the spoil.

Centuries have passed since the Perceptory was demolished, but the lost treasure of the Templars has never been recovered. It is still believed in the neighbourhood that an ancient oak to the east side of a pool, long ago filled in, is a clue to the resting place of fabulous treasure.

Eighteen miles north east of Preston in the Cambridgeshire village of Shepreth stands the ancient church of All Saints. Allegedly, the church, dating from pre-Norman times was at one point utilised by the Knights Templar. During research in to the area, we noticed a very interesting point in “Kelly’s Directory 1929” it states “there is also an ancient font…and an old oak treasure chest which was unearthed 1895. Did the chest hold the treasure from Temple Dinsley? If it did, what happened to the treasure? Unfortunately this is as far as our research has taken us into the treasure chest of Shepreth.

Back at Temple Dinsley, even though the name no longer appears on modern day maps it still remains in the minds of local people and historians with regular excavation occurring on site.
http://www.mjwayland.com/?page_id=311
Report Spam   Logged

Social Buttons

1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2012, 12:24:16 am »



Temple Dinsley circa 1885
Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2012, 12:24:44 am »


A brief history of Temple Dinsley
1100 - 1800
Although we are focusing on Preston’s history  from 1800-1901, the following is a brief account of Temple Dinsley until the nineteenth century.

The estate of Dinsley was given to the Knights Templar in the twelfth century AD. They were a group of wealthy warrior monks dedicated to keeping the highways of the Holy Land safe for pilgrims.

 

The Knights built a preceptory on the site - Temple Dinsley. This was a cross between a monastery and a manor. It became their most important estate in south-eastern England.

 

Later, in 1542, the manor was granted to Sir Ralph Sadleir - a servant of Henry VIII.

 

In the sixteenth century, Temple Dinsley was sold to Benedict Ithell. On his death, it passed to his sisters, one of whom bequeathed the estate to her steward, Thomas Harwood.

The Hertfordshire Militia List s provide striking evidence of Thomas’ social elevation. From 1758-65 he is described as a servant, gentleman’s servant, and even, labourer. Then from 1768-73, he is Thomas Harwood - Esquire!

When Thomas died in 1786, he left Temple Dinsley to a young nephew, Joseph Darton. In turn, Joseph was succeeded by his son, Thomas Harwood Darton
Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2012, 12:25:32 am »


Residents at Temple Dinsley 1800 - 1900
1800
1830
1841
1851
1861

1871
1881

Joseph Darton

Henry Crabb (1795-1830)

Thomas Halsey

Thomas Harwood Darton (1812-1858)

Maria Elizabeth Darton

     (wife of above d.1869)

John Weeks (retired builder d.1879)

Henry Brand (magistrate and MP)
The sale of Temple Dinsley in 1874

When the estate of Temple Dinsley came onto the market in 1873, the sale particulars provided a wonderful description of the estate and its various parts (even allowing for the agent’s enthusiasm).

 

Illustrating the way in which Temple Dinsley dominated Preston is the statement that for sale was ‘nearly the entire village...about forty cottages and The Chequers Inn public house’.

 

The estate occupied 560 acres of ‘very fertile land’ nearly all of which was freehold and tithe free.

 

The estate included three farms:

 

         Temple Farm (in the grounds of Temple Dinsley)

         Poynders End Farm (90 acres)

         Austage End Farm (41 acres)

 

These farms together with the mansion provided employment for many of  the villagers.

 

The house was described as a ‘fine, old mansion’.  It had a spacious hall, drawing room, billiard room, dining room, morning room, study and gun room on the ground floor - all of which were centrally heated (in 1873!).

 

On the next floor were seven bedrooms, three dressing rooms, a bathroom and two toilets.  The roof space 

Temple Dinsley 1920c after the additions by Sir E. Lutyens

Attached to the house was a large pavilion, a butler’s pantry, a kitchen, dairy, laundry and wash rooms. The outbuildings included stables (above which was an eight-day turret clock with four faces, shown above), two carriage houses, a mushroom house and a small homestead.

The ‘Temple Clock’ (as it was known ) regulated the lives of the villagers. During the Preston Hill Robbery case of 1864 there were no less than three references to the clock, which helped to establish time frames. From these comments, we learn that the clock could be seen from Preston Green - ‘It was about five minutes to nine by the Temple Clock’ - and that it could be heard at the bottom of Preston Hill. The clock was destroyed by fire in 1888. The fire was reported in the Hertfordshire Mercury:

 
Notes on hunting and shooting

When the sale of Temple Dinsley was advertised,  its agricultural potential was not promoted. The selling point was the opportunity for field sports such as the hunting and shooting of foxes, pheasants,partridges, rabbits and hares. ‘It is in a favourite hunting district....the sporting capabilities are of a high character and afford excellent partridge and pheasant shooting’.

 

This emphasis on hunting helps us to understand why the  woods around Preston survived. While there was some revenue from the sale of rights to coppice trees, the woods were mainly preserved as the haunt of wild-life which could be hunted.
The Cottage aka The Dower House

The Cottage 1920c

The Cottage was built on the north-east side of the estate, near to the Hitchin road. Today it is known as ‘The Dower House’.

 

Occupants of the Cottage:

Captain Thomas Darton

Ralston de Vins Pryor

Henry Anstruther (Lord of the Treasury)
1871
1891
1901
The sale to Major H. Pryor in 1874

Temple Dinsley was sold to Major Henry Pryor of Clifton, Beds. His sons, Ralston de Vins (RDV) and Geoffrey  Pryor (GIE) were later involved in the running of the estate and  collecting rents.

 

It is interesting that according to the 1871 census, Major Pryor’s household at Clifton included a visitor, William H. Darton, who was born at Kings Walden, Herts. Henry Pryor (31) and William (28) were serving as Captain and Lieutenant in the 7th Bedfordshire regiment. Two years later, Henry had purchased Temple Dinsley from William’s father,  Captain Thomas Darton.

was occupied by six attics.
Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2012, 12:27:27 am »



Temple Dinsley 1920c after the additions by Sir E. Lutyens
Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2012, 12:27:51 am »



Attached to the house was a large pavilion, a butler’s pantry, a kitchen, dairy, laundry and wash rooms. The outbuildings included stables (above which was an eight-day turret clock with four faces, shown above), two carriage houses, a mushroom house and a small homestead.

The ‘Temple Clock’ (as it was known ) regulated the lives of the villagers. During the Preston Hill Robbery case of 1864 there were no less than three references to the clock, which helped to establish time frames. From these comments, we learn that the clock could be seen from Preston Green - ‘It was about five minutes to nine by the Temple Clock’ - and that it could be heard at the bottom of Preston Hill. The clock was destroyed by fire in 1888. The fire was reported in the Hertfordshire Mercury:

 
Notes on hunting and shooting

When the sale of Temple Dinsley was advertised,  its agricultural potential was not promoted. The selling point was the opportunity for field sports such as the hunting and shooting of foxes, pheasants,partridges, rabbits and hares. ‘It is in a favourite hunting district....the sporting capabilities are of a high character and afford excellent partridge and pheasant shooting’.

 

This emphasis on hunting helps us to understand why the  woods around Preston survived. While there was some revenue from the sale of rights to coppice trees, the woods were mainly preserved as the haunt of wild-life which could be hunted.
Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2012, 12:28:51 am »


The Cottage aka The Dower House




The Cottage 1920c

The Cottage was built on the north-east side of the estate, near to the Hitchin road. Today it is known as ‘The Dower House’.

 

Occupants of the Cottage:

Captain Thomas Darton

Ralston de Vins Pryor

Henry Anstruther (Lord of the Treasury)
1871
1891
1901
The sale to Major H. Pryor in 1874

Temple Dinsley was sold to Major Henry Pryor of Clifton, Beds. His sons, Ralston de Vins (RDV) and Geoffrey  Pryor (GIE) were later involved in the running of the estate and  collecting rents.

 

It is interesting that according to the 1871 census, Major Pryor’s household at Clifton included a visitor, William H. Darton, who was born at Kings Walden, Herts. Henry Pryor (31) and William (28) were serving as Captain and Lieutenant in the 7th Bedfordshire regiment. Two years later, Henry had purchased Temple Dinsley from William’s father,  Captain Thomas Darton.
http://www.prestonherts.co.uk/page61.html

Report Spam   Logged
1090Crusader
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 4149



« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2012, 12:49:30 am »

Where is the knights templar treasure?

This is a question that has long tormented treasure hunters and scholars. When the Catholic Church designed to destroy the Knights Templar, they secured the assistance of the French crown. This is the origin of the superstition of "Friday the 13th" because the Templars were rounded up on that day and the crown seized all of their holdings. However, the Templars had advanced word that their fortunes had changed and they gathered together all of their treasure and three Templar ships departed from La Rochelle.
It is thought that these ships carried the vast wealth of the Templars, but in truth, they could carry but a fraction of their treasure if the tales about their wealth are reasonably accurate. The ultimate destination is unknown and it is unknown if these ships even made it to their destination. However, it would be a reasonable assumption that these ships made landfall in England. At this point in the story, nobody can give an authoritative answer to the question of "where does the treasure reside?"
Speculation regarding Rosslyn and Oak Island point to the strongest possibilities regarding the final resting place of the Templar treasure. There was significant engineering done at Oak Island and the investigation there has destroyed as much as it has uncovered. Only time will tell if anything remains, but I doubt that anyone would go through such an elaborate hoax.
With regard to Rosslyn Chapel, the builders of the chapel were known supporters of the Templars -i am editing this note (the builders are probably the freemasons) - However, nobody has ever found anything at Rosslyn and many consider the chapel to be a "key" to where the real treasure is concealed. Personally, I believe that the treasure that left in those ships was used to support the members of the order in the purchase of land, supplies, and other needs. Considering the requirements for a number of dispossessed Knights on the run from France and the Church, gold would be a necessity.
I believe that the majority of the Templar fortune never left France. To be sure, it was concealed from the French monarchy, but the Templars did not have the time necessary to move it out of France. Ultimately, this is my answer to your question. As the treasure has remained undiscovered for some time, one could assume that it is well hidden. 
More
This next information is answerd by a differant person,
But the free masions were involed they were a scottish cruside who let the templar knights join there group so maybe the treasure could of being smuggeled out of France to Scotland but this is my opinion on the place were it is hidden.
Or there is word that the treasure was brought from France into England and to a place called Nova Scotia not in the actuwal country but to an island of the coast of Nove Scotia nobody nows which island but i bet the treasure will be found one day. Its not just a small amount OS gold but treasure beyond your wildest imaganation! I dream of discovering the knights templer treasure but i now that there is many other people that have atemptad to find it and there is no way that i could ever beat anyone to the greatest treasure of all time! 
More
Refering to the first paragraph above where the answerer says there were 3 Templar ships, records show that there were in fact 18 Templar ships at La Rochelle harbour on October 12th 1307, but the next day they had vanished.

the answer bove me seems quite complex however i believe there to be a simpler answer to question, though no one can be certain.
okay so 4 knights from temple dinsley, hertfordshire were arrested and taken to hertford castle in the early 1300's. two were taken to tower of London and they were all killed at some point. this was done on the orders of kind edward ll because he believed that they were hiding treasure from him. so he had them arrested, but when they refused to tell him it's whereabouts he had them killed. so many believe that the answer is simple. the treasure which is believed to be gold, silver, jewels, and possibly even the holy grail which Jesus drunk out of at the last supper (they apparently found this on a trip to Jerusalem) is likely to have buried underneath an oak tree in temple dinsley, where the knights who hid it lived, so that they could keep watch that no one tried to find it. another theory is that they actually buried it in temple dinsley deep deep under the ground and then created a pond over the top of where it was, to make it more difficult to get to. temple dinsley today is a village called Preston in hertfordshire and there is a large pond there, however the pond that the treasure is supposedly hidden underneath has been dug over, but no one knows exactly where it was. the spot where the treasure may have been buried unfortuantely has an old building on it which is now a school.

The whole truth will almost certainly never come to light. Much of the Temple assets in France found their way into the Royal treasury. Phillip the Fair needed the money to pay off a crushing national debt. Chances are that much of it from outside France went to the Hospitallers along with their real estate and much of the membership. Some of those assets may simply have been stolen or individual members may have removed assets with the intent to restore them to the Temple at some future date.

Neither is there any documented or archeological evidence that the Templar Fleet previously in harbor at New Rochelle ever reached Scotland nor that it carried the so called, "Templar Treasure." No hard evidence of any kind exists that any ship of any description carrying even one Templar Knight or anyone connected with the Temple ever reached North America. In fact, the so-called Zeno map does not mention the Temple at all. Moreover, the map has been shown to be a forgery. No evidence of any description supports speculation that the Templars ever possessed any of the, "treasures of the Temple of Solomon."

Likewise, there is no documented connection between the Templars and the Oak Island Money Pit. In fact, much of the speculation about the pit has been put to rest. For example, the only evidence there is for the existence of those much discussed buried timbers, etc. is complete hearsay and the so called tunnels that introduced sea water to the pit are not tunnels at all. All that water seeped in through naturally occurring features. Oh yes, there is one other thing. There is absolutely no evidence that Henry I Sinclair Earl of Orkney ever visited Greenland or any part of North America.

Conversely, there is ample evidence that many of the authors who are building up their own portfolios with wild speculation concerning the Templar Treasure or the purported mystical properties of the Temple are earning a substantial living by selling books to people who want to believe these things whether they are true or not. They are simply following in the footsteps of the, "Eric von Daniken" books from the seventies and all that nonsense about Aztec crystal skulls having mystical properties. When you stop to think about it, those books are the perfect con game. There is no law against publishing nonsense or selling the books that contains that nonsense. Buying a book is a legal transaction in nearly every case. Believing silly nonsense is a personal prerogative unless one does real harm as result.

The bottom line is that all those stories about the Templars having owned the Ark of the Covenant, the Holy Grail and the True Cross are just that, stories. They may be amusing but they are not factual.

Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Where_is_the_knights_templar_treasure#ixzz1ymTsjdpt
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum | Buy traffic for your forum/website
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines